Swine Flu Vaccine - will you take it?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacGeek7, May 25, 2009.

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Will you take the Swine Flu vaccine?

  1. Yes

    8 vote(s)
    17.8%
  2. No

    28 vote(s)
    62.2%
  3. Maybe

    7 vote(s)
    15.6%
  4. Undecided

    2 vote(s)
    4.4%
  1. MacGeek7 macrumors 6502a

    MacGeek7

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2007
    #1
    Honestly, I'm getting rather tired of the Swine Flu and the panic it's causing/caused. I also found an article on Reuters that said companies could vaccinate over 4.9 billion people against the swine flu.

    Now, if people would slow down long enough to think they would remember that this is not new to our country (USA) or the world for that matter. 1 person died in 1976 from the swine flu but then over 25 died from the vaccine which begs the question, this time around, over 30 years later, will you take the swine flu vaccine?

    And yes, I realize that there have been more deaths, however, it is still less than 100 but it's also important to realize that nearly 3 million people die from TB alone each year. TB is contagious and spreads through the air like the common cold.

    So I present the question to you, will you take a swine flu vaccine when it eventually hits the market?
     
  2. zap2 macrumors 604

    zap2

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Washington D.C
    #2
    No...swine flue isn't any worse then regular flue, and I don't take a vaccine for regular flue. If I were very old, yes, I wouldn't want to risk it, but my health is good now.
     
  3. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Location:
    bump on a log in a hole in the bottom of the sea
    #3
    No thanks. I'm not intimidated by this any more than the regular flu. ;)
     
  4. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #4
    Yes.

    It should be taken seriously.

    The problem with epidemics is that it's almost impossible to know right from the start how serious it's going to be.

    You'd do well to read up on the tragically misnamed "Spanish Flu" epidemic of 1918-19. I lost a great grandfather, his brother and 3 other distant relatives.

    It was named the Spanish Flu because Spain was the only country in the western world that had a free press. The US, Canada, UK and the rest of Europe were censoring everything because of the war effort. Actually, it's very reminiscent of the bushco regime, but I digress. By the time the US took the problem seriously, it was too late and panic, the likes of which you could not possibly imagine, took over.

    Panic isn't a pretty thing, but as WHO has made clear for years now, nobody knows when or where or with how great of severity the next flu pandemic will strike. You'd do well to remember though, that it WILL strike.

    Putting your head in the sand isn't going to do you any good. If anything, this is the time to review your own personal hygeine.
     
  5. Eanair macrumors 6502

    Eanair

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
  6. zap2 macrumors 604

    zap2

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Washington D.C
    #7
    They really are not the same...the Spanish flue hit during a war( soldiers had poor healthcare, some were feed poorly, living close made it easier to spread) Not to mention the virus itself was very deadly.

    Swine Flue is not. Swine flue is getting lots of attention because the media is playing it up. Then you get public officials like Biden say "don't use public transportation" and Obama saying we have tools ready to fight against this. None of there claims are supported by evidence we have. Most of the people who got Swine flue and died lived in an area were healthcare was poor, diet was poor. We are seeing governments finally admit that swine flue isn't all that much worse then standard "flue"(which admittedly can will, so if you're in a group who is likely to die if they get infected, I'd suggest getting that vaccine)

    I'm all for fighting diseases when they happen, but we need to act based off evidence, not a gut feeling.


    While true, that doesn't mean we should over react when there is a possibility of an outbreak. That would be panic.
     
  7. Eanair macrumors 6502

    Eanair

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    #8
    An influenza virus of swine origin is not new to the world or USA, correct, but this individual strain is. That's what makes this a pandemic - or "pandemic potential" as the phrase is now. A new disease or strain of an existing disease where a population is expected to have little or no immunity.

    The Spanish Influenza also made a very mild showing in the spring, only to disappear during the summer and come back with a vengeance in the winter.

    We would be very apt to monitor this virus in the upcoming flu season in the southern hemisphere.
     
  8. Don't panic macrumors 603

    Don't panic

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    having a drink at Milliways
    #9
    it will be most likely incorporated in the other flu vaccines, so i don't se why not.
     
  9. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    The Mergui Archipelago
    #10
    If there was in an indication for it then i'd take it absolutely. Just one quick needle.

    edit: as with a TB vaccine. I'm not sure what the comparison is trying to demonstrate :confused:
     
  10. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Location:
    Space--The ONLY Frontier
    #12
    I'm a disabled veteran so I'm sure I've already taken it without even knowing.
     
  11. emt1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #13
    What's the difference between "maybe" and "undecided"?
     
  12. redwarrior macrumors 603

    redwarrior

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    in the Dawg house
  13. Sehnsucht macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    #15
    Nope. People in third-world countries without access to proper health care are the ones dying from it, if I am to understand correctly. I'm pretty sure it's just usual media hype...remember SARS? Neither do I. ;)
     
  14. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

    Joined:
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    #16
    The fact that you are able to forget SARS (for now) is not simply because it was a beat up by the media. It was largely due to one of the most fantastically orchestrated public health initiatives by local health authorities, the CDC and WHO. Spread of the virus was attacked aggressively and simultaneously on every continent which it occurred. The coronavirus was identified exceptionally quickly and treatments were determined and ramped up immediately thereafter. It's one of the greatest achievements of modern medical science. And the risk most certainly isn't over.

    Still we ended up with about a 10-20% mortality rate. Which is massive. Around 800 people died. Its easy to dismiss the sheer effort that went into controlling its spread when you come from a region that didn't face the consequences. One shouldn't be complacent.
     
  15. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    #17
    I don't get flu shots regularly, not sure why I would start.
     
  16. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #18
    Yes, if it's offered and recommended, I'll get it: there'd be no reason not to.
     
  17. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    The Mergui Archipelago
    #19
    For the people that emphatically said no, if there was a wider outbreak in your demographic area, at what mortality rate (percentage) would you be willing to get one? 0.01%? 1.0% 5.0%, 10%, 50%....

    edit: I'm seriously interested in this. It's not a trick question or anything. Just want to know when people would be worried enough to overcome their reasons for not taking a vaccine.
     
  18. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #20
    Once panic sets in, will there be any doses available?

    I think every new and dangerous flu should be taken seriously. More importantly, we should revisit our personal hygeine. Washing your hands is the single most effective way of avoiding the flu. I'll bet that most of those who voted no haven't changed how frequently or thoroughly they wash.
     
  19. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #21
    People have to be scared of something. Why take the swine flu vaccine and be forced to find something new to be afraid of? :rolleyes:
     
  20. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #22
    Provided the virus grows to high titer in cell culture and no problems occur (remember Chiron? I didn't think so ;) ). If it has to be grown in eggs, then at most about 300 million doses.

    The problem is that you cannot predict how influenza viruses will behave. That one person was a young (18 yo) healthy US Army recruit who died in May. The other 12 Hsw1N1 A/New Jersey virus-infected Army personnel at Fort Dix had severe respiratory disease but survived. Young dying and a high case fatality rate had only occurred one other time in recorded history with influenza - the 1918 pandemic. In both instances the the virus was an H1N1. Those 25 deaths "from" the vaccination were mostly complications of more than 20 million immunizations. It's all about risk. When lives are at stake, it is better to err on the side of overreaction than underreaction. Had a vaccination program not been implemented and that virus took off, then people would have bitched about the ineffectual CDC. Vaccines are victims of their own successes.

    Transmission of influenza and TB are not even close to one another. Not to diminish the importance of TB, but influenza disseminates much more efficiently than TB. The infections (and deaths) from TB are higher because of malnutrition and the unavailability of proper antibiotics. The fear is an influenza that kills healthy people; influenzas are easy to control (by vaccinations), TB isn't.

    Yes.

    Now I know where influenza viruses amplify before they infect the elderly and very young children who die from influenza each year.

    The "Spanish Flu" (which should really be called the "Fort Riley Flu") originated in the USA, manifesting itself at Fort Riley, Kansas in May. It went quiescent in the summer only to reemerge in the fall and winter of 1918. Good ole influenza viruses: they have all kinds of genetic tricks up their sleeves.

    Not this year. This year's production run is already bottled. What they're making now is a new production run, either in eggs or cell culture. Two shots for next year, but possibly one the following years. Stay tuned.

    Except the TB vaccine doesn't work (statistically speaking).

    Yeah, I remember SARS. Obviously you do, too, since you brought it up. ;)

    SARS was easy to contain because people are symptomatic before they shed virus. Not so for influenza; typically virus is shed the two days prior to disease onset.

    So long as the Chinese don't practice good public health policy it isn't. The viruses are circulating in bats and could reemerge under the right conditions (whatever those might be). The Chinese cannot be trusted - they're even worse than Viet Nam (which at least has permitted a WHO lab in its country). But then again, at least they mandate vaccination when available. Unfortunately, in the West, "freedom" sometimes means freedom from civil responsibility.
     
  21. Jaffa Cake macrumors Core

    Jaffa Cake

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    The City of Culture, Englandshire
    #23
    The British Government apparently has a significant number of doses on order – it remains to be seen if they'll be given with the regular flu shots in the autumn or if they'll be withheld until a major outbreak looks likely. I'd guess they'll go with the former, in which case I may well be getting a swine flu shot later this year. Oink oink.
     
  22. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #24
    Me neither. I've never even had the flu.
     
  23. Dagless Suspended

    Dagless

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Fighting to stay in the EU
    #25
    Maybe, I've never had the flu though so I don't know how it feels. But I hate illness and if swine flu is worst for healthy adults than the regular flu then I might as well protect myself.
     

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