Synology on ethernet, network on Wifi. impossible to connec to synology!!!

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by swiss tony, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. swiss tony macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    #1
    Hi guys,

    i have my synology 212j hooked up over gigabit direct to my macbook pro for intial gigabit transfers of stuff. problem is when i turn on the wifi to get the internet going i can no longer login to the DSM interface over safari, have tried with static IP etc etc. really annoying.

    im sure this must be easy to fix....

    thanks!
     
  2. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #2
    I've got the same Synology NAS, what router do you use. Some D-Link el cheapos have a problem with LAN to Wireless.
     
  3. takeshi74 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    #3
    The router wouldn't be handling wired to WiFi in the OP's situation.
     
  4. monsieurpaul macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    #4
    If your Syno ethernet is plugged directly on the Macbook, it is no wonder that you can't access it easily through Safari.
     
  5. jackrv macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    #5
    Current Mac adapters have built in AUTO MDIX, so direct connections are possible w/o a crossover cable. Plus the OP says it works until he turns on WiFi.
    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2274

    What you can try, is change the preference order of your network connections so Ethernet is before WiFi. In Network Control Panel, click the cog wheel and Set Service Order. If that doesn't work, you can always change it back.
     
  6. gsahli macrumors 6502a

    gsahli

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #6
    You need to set up the ethernet connection (Network prefs) for Configure: Manually, and give the Synology and your Mac static IP addresses in a subnet that's different than the Wifi/router's subnet.
    (Airport can be Configure: DHCP)
    Example - Wifi and router are in subnet 192.168.1.xxx, make ethernet and Synology in subnet 192.168.2.xxx.
    ("subnet mask" would be 255.255.255.0 for all of these)
     
  7. monsieurpaul macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    #7
    Does it means that your router is not Gigabit ?

    Anyway, now that you have done your initial transfer, you could hook the syno on the router rather than the macbook. I f you want to keep gigabit connection, you could also add a gigabit switch (aroudn 25 $) connected to the router and both the syno and the macbook connected to the switch. This is my setup and it works fine.
     
  8. SonnyDickson, Apr 1, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  9. henriquede81 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    #9
    I did exactly this but still cannot access the NAS from any device over the wifi ... only from the iMac plugged directly to the NAS over ethernet.

    Any idea why this is not working?
     
  10. Mikael H macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    #10
    Have you configured your mac to actually route traffic to the NAS from your network? If not, then that's your problem. If you don't know what I just blabbered about, read on:

    What you probably want to do, is to plug the NAS into one of the ethernet connections on a gigabit capable router (or via a gigabit switch to a less capable router), and then plug your iMac into the same switch or router.

    Also, unless you know what you're doing, you probably do want to use the same subnet on the NAS as you have on your wireless network. That way, there'll be no confusion: The router will make sure network traffic goes the right ways and won't care if the connection is made using a wired or wireless connection.
     
  11. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #11
    Install Synology's DHCP server package if you're not using a router.
     
  12. henriquede81 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    #12
    Thanks for your reply. My configuration is:

    1) Wifi and router are in subnet 192.168.1.xxx ... iMac is using this wifi.

    2) iMac ethernet and NAS in subnet 192.168.2.xxx (without switch, I'm sharing WIFI internet to computers using the ETHERNET)

    My NAS have "internet" and I'm able to connect to all my NAS folder from the iMac but not from another computer over the wifi.

    I really need to have a switch? I'm quite sure I'm doing something wrong or missing something else.
     
  13. henriquede81 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    #13
    Not found on the "Synology App Store" ...
     
  14. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #14
    You're right, my mistake.

    A typical home network would be.
    WAN - Router -> (optional switch) -> your electronics.

    All should be on the same subnet e.g. 192.168.1.xxx

    If your router doesn't have GigE ports on the LAN side then you really need a GigE switch. Hook it to router LAN1 and everything else to the switch (nothing on the other router LAN ports).
     
  15. Mikael H, Dec 6, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2014

    Mikael H macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    #15
    OK, let's break it down from scratch:
    If I read your reply correctly, your Internet connection arrives to the computer via WiFi, and then you use the Internet Sharing function on the iMac to allow the NAS to see the Internet.
    Your problem here, is that the wireless devices connected to the 192.168.1.x network are being told by the router that all IP addresses except for that address range are reachable through that specific router (probably 192.168.1.1). But the router doesn't know that the 192.168.2.1 network begins with your iMac, so it can't route traffic there.

    The simple solution, is to make sure that everything that's supposed to be able to reach something else in your house is in the same subnet.

    If there is no way for you to connect your iMac and the NAS box to the Internet-connected router via ethernet cables, the simplest way is probably to buy a second wireless router (which is capable of this functionality) and set it up as a bridge between the wireless part of the network and the wired part instead of letting the iMac perform this function. This has the added benefit that the NAS will have an Internet connection even if you'd choose to turn of your computer.

    Getting gigabit speeds between the NAS and the iMac is just a matter of choosing an expensive enough router (or a gigabit switch) on the receiving end.


    A simple choice for a router near the iMac + NAS would be an AirPort Extreme. I haven't tried this particular setup with one, but I have with an Express, and that worked perfectly. The Extreme has several gigabit ports, though, which an Express lacks, so the former would allow the highest possible throughput between the NAS and the iMac without additional hardware.
    The price difference between an Express + a gigabit switch, and an Extreme isn't very big, so there's really no point in skimping there.

    An alternative, is to read up on other routers and see which ones would do the job, with or without some additional hacking. It's just a question of what's worth more to you: Your time or your money.
     
  16. henriquede81 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    #16
    Thanks a lot for your detailed reply... I had all these options on my mind but I would not be able to explain them to someone else like the way you just did. :)

    I has wondering if I could end up setting what I want using only software/config. Of course, if the iMac is switched off everybody have no NAS, but it would be not that bad. Because the DSL router (wifi) is really really really really really really unaccessible... I think my best shot would be to go for something like an Airport Extreme, mainly because having the the giga-connection between NAS-iMac is critical.
     
  17. Mikael H macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    #17
    Well, technically you probably could, but it would cost you a great deal of time and frustration, and you'd be doing all the config through the command line.
    There's simply no reason to complicate things unless you really don't have money to spend. This use case is common enough that it's easy to find appliances that will solve the problem for you with very little work on your part.

    Good luck!
     

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