Tax Free Holiday in Massachusetts 8/14 and 8/15?

ouimetnick

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Aug 28, 2008
2,553
1,071
Beverly, Massachusetts
So I hear that August 14th and 15th are tax free days in Massachusetts. However it was waiting approval from the senate. Thats the last I heard about it. Does anyone know if the government or senate or who ever was left to sign it, did?

In short, is August 14th and 15th CONFIRMED to be a tax free day in Massachusetts? I will be buying MacBook Pro 13" (same specs as my mom) and if August 14th and 15th are Tax free days in Massachusetts my dad said I could get it then.


Thanks!

-Nick
 

decksnap

macrumors 68040
Apr 11, 2003
3,068
70
You could also drive a half hour north any day of the year and get no sales tax in New Hampshire.
 

carbonmotion

macrumors 6502a
Jan 28, 2004
983
0
San Francisco, CA
No sales tax in NH. And I got my MBP and Magic Mouse yesterday in Massachusetts w/o any tax. Woo.
I'm too lazy to look it up in my law books, but I think Wikipedia is about 99% right on this issue. Quoted from Wikipedia.com...

"A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States. It is assessed upon otherwise "tax free" tangible personal property purchased by a resident of the assessing state for use, storage or consumption of goods in that state (not for resale), regardless of where the purchase took place. The use tax is typically assessed at the same rate as the sales tax that would have been owed (if any) had the same goods been purchased in the state of residence. Use tax applies when sales tax has not been charged. Purchases made over the Internet and out-of-state are the most common type of transactions subject to a use tax.

For example, a resident of Massachusetts, with a 6.25% percent "sales and use tax" on certain goods and services, purchases non-exempt goods or services in New Hampshire for use, storage or other consumption in Massachusetts. Under New Hampshire law, the New Hampshire vendor collects no sales taxes on the goods but the purchaser/user must still pay six and a quarter percent of the sales price directly to the Department of Revenue in Massachusetts as a use tax."

If you don't report this, you're cheating on your state taxes.
 

decksnap

macrumors 68040
Apr 11, 2003
3,068
70
I'm too lazy to look it up in my law books, but I think Wikipedia is about 99% right on this issue. Quoted from Wikipedia.com...

"A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States. It is assessed upon otherwise "tax free" tangible personal property purchased by a resident of the assessing state for use, storage or consumption of goods in that state (not for resale), regardless of where the purchase took place. The use tax is typically assessed at the same rate as the sales tax that would have been owed (if any) had the same goods been purchased in the state of residence. Use tax applies when sales tax has not been charged. Purchases made over the Internet and out-of-state are the most common type of transactions subject to a use tax.

For example, a resident of Massachusetts, with a 6.25% percent "sales and use tax" on certain goods and services, purchases non-exempt goods or services in New Hampshire for use, storage or other consumption in Massachusetts. Under New Hampshire law, the New Hampshire vendor collects no sales taxes on the goods but the purchaser/user must still pay six and a quarter percent of the sales price directly to the Department of Revenue in Massachusetts as a use tax."

If you don't report this, you're cheating on your state taxes.
jealous :)

I guess you'd have to look up a list of what has to be claimed. NH advertises their tax-free status to out of staters very strongly.
 

Plutonius

macrumors G3
Feb 22, 2003
8,417
7,290
New Hampshire, USA
For example, a resident of Massachusetts, with a 6.25% percent "sales and use tax" on certain goods and services, purchases non-exempt goods or services in New Hampshire for use, storage or other consumption in Massachusetts. Under New Hampshire law, the New Hampshire vendor collects no sales taxes on the goods but the purchaser/user must still pay six and a quarter percent of the sales price directly to the Department of Revenue in Massachusetts as a use tax."

If you don't report this, you're cheating on your state taxes.
You are correct and I think nobody reports it. Mass. does get it's money though since a large portion of the NH population works in Mass. and has to pay the Mass. income tax (and they get very little benefits from the income tax payed to Mass.) (i.e. Mass. gets a very nice return on the income tax money from NH residents who work in Mass.).
 

Counterfit

macrumors G3
Aug 20, 2003
8,201
0
sitting on your shoulder
People who work in MA but live in another state don't pay the same amount of income tax that MA residents would. If that had been the case, my mother probably wouldn't have worked there for 30+ years. Plus, many states let you deduct income taxes paid to another state.
 

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