Tea Party clout on the line in Tuesday Primaries

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by bradl, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
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    #1
    While everyone has been arguing about the Mosque in NYC, Obama's religious faith, Beck's latest sphiel, and the Koran, we all seem to have forgotten that today in a number of states, elections were going on. And while fairly nominal, it was the first real test of the Tea "Party" (I use the word lightly and per what the Press is giving them; they aren't a recognized party). With that...

    McCain Wins Renomination; Novice Shines in Florida
    Bit of a problem with the AP's article, though. Nevada, Colorado, and Utah didn't have any elections today, and according to the website for WAVE (local TV station) in Louisville, none of the precincts have reported in. It also says a lot about Palin's clout in Alaska. One commenter mentioned that in the beginning, they supported the Tea 'Party', but because the ads they took out were mean-spirited and outright nasty, because they couldn't be anything positive, he dropped them and voted for Murkowski, who won. So, if her 'endorsed' candidate can't even win for her in her home state, what chance would she have outside of it?

    Either way, I'll agree that there is a lot of enthusiasm with the Reds right now provided by the teabaggers, but if they don't get it together, their divisiveness may be their undoing.

    BL.
     
  2. David G. macrumors 65816

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    Alaska
    #2
    Murkowski won?
    [​IMG]

    I don't know much about the other states, but the Anchorage Daily News has consistently had Joe Miller ahead. So far 225 out of 438 precincts have reported in.


    Read more: http://www.adn.com/2010/08/17/1413477/2010-unofficial-primary-election.html#ixzz0xbD4caV1
     
  3. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #3
    What anti-incumbent fever?

    Funny you should mention this...I was going to post a related topic, so now I guess I'll just add it here.

    It seems that while Murkowski may have lost, apparently Palin's reach extends only as far as her state borders. She is now 1 for 6 on her endorsements.

    As far as "anti-incumbent fever" goes, Rachel Maddow took an amusing, excellent look at that the other night. Seems incumbents are winning everywhere, while the challengers who won could all fit into someone's kitchen. A small kitchen. Her conclusion: the "anti-incumbent mood" of the country is alive more in the minds of the media than in real life.

    But...ya know...Can't Stop the Meme.... :D
     

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  4. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #4
  5. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #5

    Yeah, didn't take long for her to catch the Olbermann stink.
     
  6. fivepoint macrumors 65816

    fivepoint

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    #6
    The 'anti-incumbent' mood has always been vastly overblown in my book. It's all about going more conservative, especially more fiscally conservative. Liberals are winning by distancing themselves from Obama and fiscal liberalism. Conservatives are winning with the same strategy. The more they can paint themselves as someone who will tighten the purse strings in Washington and stop the out-of-control freight train of spending in Washington have a much better chance of being elected.
     
  7. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #7
    Painting with a shovel, how avant garde.
     
  8. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #8
    Why? What's the gain? Which other successful countries are to the right of the US?
     
  9. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #9
    Can someone translate for me? I'm trying to figure out exactly what's being said. Is it that the TEA Party has had a huge influence or a minimal one?
     
  10. fivepoint macrumors 65816

    fivepoint

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    #10
    Why did Greece go under? Fiscal conservatism?
    Why is Britain making moves to spend less on gov't programs?
    Why did the EU snub their noses at Obama's last stimulus request?

    You're asking all the wrong questions... you should be asking yourself... how did we get into this mess? How can we start reducing the money we're spending? How can we run a more efficient and less wasteful government? Does money do more good in the hands of consumers or in the hands of government? Does the cost/benefit ratio government run entitlement programs end up positive or negative? How much more damage does hyper-inflation do to the poor and middle-class than reduced entitlements? Does a central elite group in Washington know how better to spend my money than I do? I spend less and get a second job if things are tight at my house, why... when the government is faced with the exact same problem, do they spend more?
     
  11. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #11
    No, because the upper middle class/rich didn't pay any tax and because the government didn't balance the budget.

    Sounds a lot like the republican party come to think of it.

    To balance the budget.
     
  12. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #12
    Where does all your money go? (hint: "the government" is not the correct answer)
     
  13. fivepoint macrumors 65816

    fivepoint

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    #13
    With all due respect, you're living in a fantasy world if you think the collapse was primarily due to unpaid taxes. Did it play a role? Certainly, so did hosting the Olympics, but let's be honest about the primary causes.

    "Whereas during the 1990s, Greece frequently had to pay out 10 percent or more (18 percent in 1994) to borrow money, its rate fell dramatically to 3 percent or 2 percent. Ben May, Greek economist at think tank Capital Economics, said: "Their mistake was to go out, borrow money and use it to fund huge wage growth, rather than pay down its already substantial debts."

    "Greece went on a spending spree, allowing public sector workers' wages to nearly double over the last decade, while it continued to fund one of the most generous pension systems in the world. Workers when they come to retire usually receive a pension equating to 92 percent of their pre-retirement salary. As Greece has one of the fastest ageing populations in Europe, the bill to fund these pensions kept on mounting."


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #14
    Ok, continue. You said "causes", what were the other ones?
     
  15. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #15
    No I said it was primarily due to unpaid taxes and not balancing the budget.

    If you think it was primarily due to not balancing the budget and secondarily to do with unpaid taxes then we don't really disagree by very much at all.
     
  16. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #16
    I don't know...I find many of these questions repetitive (i.e., they've already been answered many times before), artificially obtuse, and only tangentially on-topic.

    And getting back to that topic...

    Minimal. No single group has been so associated with calling for the ousting of incumbents as the tea party, and the Maddow clip points out that out of 324 primary races run through this past Monday, only seven incumbents have lost. That's not a revolution; it's more like a cap pistol.
     
  17. supercaliber macrumors regular

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    #17
    So you are saying that a government that provides huge benefits to its citizens cannot get its citizens to pay their taxes?

    What the ......!
     
  18. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #18
    Nonetheless. With the financial backing of Koch, Armey and (nominally) Murdoch, the Tea Party has made a name for itself. In American politics, making a name for oneself is hugely important, doubly so if you can put a grass-roots, populist face on it. The fact that they are still being discussed is very significant, as pathetic as they efforts have proven to be.

    Me, I am idly watching the Kansas senate race to see if Kansans will, as expected, vote a Moran into office (what an unfortunate name these days).
     
  19. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #19
    Well if by "huge benefits" you mean the Greek government is corrupt - yes.
     
  20. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #20
    I think the period between last summer and this spring was the apex for them. Ross Perot's reform party burned brightly for a while too, but it eventually faded. And while the tea partiers have Sarah Palin and other rabble rousers to try to keep things going, the lack of tangible results will mean, I think, that the press will gradually begin to lose interest.

    I'm just glad that with so few primaries left, we can say with confidence that even if Republicans take control of one or both houses of Congress in November, few if any of them will be tea party candidates.

    I do also think that there's a silver lining to this whole "anger" travesty. It is that, if more Republicans get in, you won't see anything being accomplished, not even by narrow margins as we have the past two years. The Republicans will ramp up the obstructionism and bring Congress to a total, dead stop. If voters think they're angry at Congress now, wait'll they get a load of what will happen if more Republicans are elected. Hopefully if we have to have suffer through two years of legislative inertia, at least it will turn the light bulbs on over the heads of those who think they're "punishing" the Democratic party.
     

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