Texas Governor Rick Perry indicted by grand jury


rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,409
Oops - Rick Perry Indicted

Does he have to go in for fingerprints and mug shots?



A grand jury indicted Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Friday for abusing the powers of his office by carrying out a threat to veto funding for state prosecutors investigating public corruption — making the possible 2016 presidential hopeful his state's first indicted governor in nearly a century.

A special prosecutor spent months calling witnesses and presenting evidence that Perry broke the law when he promised publicly to nix $7.5 million over two years for the public integrity unit, which is run by Travis County District Rosemary Lehmberg's office. Several top aides to the Republican governor appeared before grand jurors in Austin, including his deputy chief of staff, legislative director and general counsel. Perry himself wasn't called to testify.

He was indicted by an Austin grand jury on felony counts of abuse of official capacity and coercion of a public servant. Maximum punishment on the first charge is five to 99 years in prison. The second is two to 10 years.

Perry said Lehmberg, who is based in Austin, should resign after she was arrested and plead guilty to drunken driving in April 2013. A video recording made at the jail showed Lehmberg shouting at staffers to call the sheriff, kicking the door of her cell and sticking her tongue out.

Lehmberg served about half of her 45-day jail sentence but stayed in office, despite Perry's assertions that her behavior was inappropriate.

Perry eventually carried out his veto threat. No one disputes that he is allowed to veto measures approved by the Legislature, including part or all of the state budget. But the left-leaning Texans for Public Justice government watchdog group filed an ethics complaint accusing the governor of coercion since he threatened to use his veto before actually doing so in an attempt to pressure Lehmberg to quit.

The indictment is the first of its kind since 1917, when James "Pa" Ferguson was indicted on charges stemming from his veto of state funding to the University of Texas in effort to unseat faculty and staff members he objected to. Ferguson was eventually impeached, then resigned before being convicted — allowing his wife, Miriam "Ma" Ferguson, to take over the governorship.

In office since 2000 and already the longest-serving governor in Texas history, Perry isn't seeking re-election in November. But the ongoing criminal investigation could mar his political prospects as he mulls another run at the White House, after his 2012 presidential bid flamed out.

Lehmberg, a Democrat, faced pressure from other high-profile Republicans in addition to Perry to give up her post. Her blood-alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit for driving, and she eventually served about half of a 45-day jail sentence.

Meanwhile, the jail video led to an investigation of Lehmberg by a separate grand jury, which decided she should not be removed for official misconduct.
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/texas-perry-indicted-coercion-veto-threat-25003869
 

webbuzz

macrumors 68000
Jul 24, 2010
1,522
5,641
Indeed. Four out of the last seven Illinois Governors have been to prison.

The videos of the Travis County DA being pulled over, field sobriety test, and booking are interesting.

.23 BAC? She should have resigned.
 
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bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
4,006
11,823
I was under the impression that a governor was allowed to veto. Think Obama will get indicted if he vetoes?
From the Article:

Perry eventually carried out his veto threat. No one disputes that he is allowed to veto measures approved by the Legislature, including part or all of the state budget. But the left-leaning Texans for Public Justice government watchdog group filed an ethics complaint accusing the governor of coercion since he threatened to use his veto before actually doing so in an attempt to pressure Lehmberg to quit.
The veto isn't the problem. Using the power of veto to attempt to pressure someone to quit their job is the problem. The grand jury saw it that way as well.

My guess is that he'll try to find a way to drag this out until he's out of office, then it becomes a non-issue. Otherwise, if another Red gets elected governor, a pardon is most likely.

BL.
 

citizenzen

macrumors 65816
Mar 22, 2010
1,433
11,628
I was under the impression that a governor was allowed to veto. Think Obama will get indicted if he vetoes?
Perry is indicted for using the treat of a veto to pressure a public servant to resign.

The Texas Grand Jury was presented evidence, heard testimony and based in that chose to indict.

Seems pretty straight forward to me.
 

Moyank24

macrumors 601
Aug 31, 2009
4,334
2,421
in a New York State of mind
I was under the impression that a governor was allowed to veto. Think Obama will get indicted if he vetoes?
If there was a game where you had to relate anything and everything to Obama you would win. Like every time.

7 degrees of Obama Hate.

You have my permission to patent that sh**.


Regarding our esteemed Governor....one less nut to worry about in 2016. :D
 

citizenzen

macrumors 65816
Mar 22, 2010
1,433
11,628
That does sound like abuse of power
TBH, it's not the biggest deal in the world to me.

And I doubt this will have any lasting impact on Perry's campaign.

Of all the abuses of power I've seen in my day, this is pretty small potatoes.
 

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,474
8,051
Somewhere
I was under the impression that a governor was allowed to veto. Think Obama will get indicted if he vetoes?
It's just like a governor can appoint whoever he wants to the senate when one of his state's senators resigns, but it becomes a problem when he wants money for it.
 

Technarchy

macrumors 604
May 21, 2012
6,747
4,885
It's just like a governor can appoint whoever he wants to the senate when one of his state's senators resigns, but it becomes a problem when he wants money for it.
I think this is going to get tricky.

Perry is operating within his power as governor to veto.

Perry thought a public official should resign for being a drunk.

I see it being very difficult to correlate the two unless there is some real evidence with a link

Something like the Blagojevich case in Chicago, which is a perfect example of what you mentioned, is pretty clear cut. The evidence is there and above suspicion.
 

shinji

macrumors 65816
Mar 18, 2007
1,306
1,497
The person he wants to resign got a DWI while serving as district attorney. She should have resigned on her own.

A video recording made at the jail showed Lehmberg shouting at staffers to call the sheriff, kicking the door of her cell and sticking her tongue out. Her blood-alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit for driving.
 

malman89

macrumors 68000
May 29, 2011
1,651
6
Michigan
The person he wants to resign got a DWI while serving as district attorney. She should have resigned on her own.
Don't disagree with that, but if the actions played out as indicated in the case, then that's not right either and Perry is also at fault.
 

Technarchy

macrumors 604
May 21, 2012
6,747
4,885
I despise Rick Perry but this looks like a political play from end to end. Texans and their wacky laws.
That's the vibe I am getting as well. Governors cut budgets all the time and sometimes their political opposition gets the cut as well.

Unless there is some real tangible evidence, I don't see this going anywhere.
 

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,474
8,051
Somewhere
I think this is going to get tricky.

Perry is operating within his power as governor to veto.

Perry thought a public official should resign for being a drunk.

I see it being very difficult to correlate the two unless there is some real evidence with a link

Something like the Blagojevich case in Chicago, which is a perfect example of what you mentioned, is pretty clear cut. The evidence is there and above suspicion.
It seems to be pretty obvious that he was threatening to use the veto if she didn't resign and he would have signed it otherwise. And that is just as illegal as what Blagojevich did with the difference being that Perry is a Republican so some people think he should be able to get away with it.
 

citizenzen

macrumors 65816
Mar 22, 2010
1,433
11,628
I think this is going to get tricky.

Perry is operating within his power as governor to veto.

Perry thought a public official should resign for being a drunk.

I see it being very difficult to correlate the two unless there is some real evidence with a link

Something like the Blagojevich case in Chicago, which is a perfect example of what you mentioned, is pretty clear cut. The evidence is there and above suspicion.
The Grand Jury saw the "real" evidence.

They heard the "real" testimony.

Apparently it wasn't as difficult to make that connection as you imagine.
 

burgundyyears

macrumors 6502
Sep 3, 2010
378
189
It seems to be pretty obvious that he was threatening to use the veto if she didn't resign and he would have signed it otherwise. And that is just as illegal as what Blagojevich did with the difference being that Perry is a Republican so some people think he should be able to get away with it.
Blagejovich actually tried to sell a Senate seat, among other things, and was actually convicted. Perry, doofus as he is, just played hardball with a reprobate drunk driver and got indicted in the most liberal enclave in Texas. Even if there is some technical law violation, it's not really the same. Heck, of all the stupid things Perry has said and done, this seems one of the less bad.
 

Technarchy

macrumors 604
May 21, 2012
6,747
4,885
It seems to be pretty obvious that he was threatening to use the veto if she didn't resign and he would have signed it otherwise. And that is just as illegal as what Blagojevich did with the difference being that Perry is a Republican so some people think he should be able to get away with it.
I think if there was some hard evidence illustrating the absolute connection it would have been national news...like Blagojevich.