Thank goodness for Mojave

Jack Neill

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2015
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San Antonio Texas
My 13 inch 2017 MacBook Pro is still on its original Sierra software. I’m interested in getting dark mode on it since I like it so much on iOS 13. Seems like Catalina isn’t quite up to snuff yet. Can I go straight to the last version of Mojave from Sierra? How do I do it? Should I?! Thanks.
Yes. Download the Mojave app and upgrade.
 

imagineadam

macrumors 65816
Jan 19, 2011
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Yes. Download the Mojave app and upgrade.
I could always easily downgrade back to Sierra if I wanted to correct?

We mainly use it for web browsing on safari and watching shows. It literally has like nothing on it as for pictures or videos. We have all of those on our phones so I don’t even think I would worry about backing it up before upgrading it. I’m just curious how easy it is to downgrade it if I notice an annoying dip in performance going from Sierra to Mojave.
 
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Jack Neill

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2015
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San Antonio Texas
I could always easily downgrade back to Sierra if I wanted to correct?

We mainly use it for web browsing on safari and watching shows. It literally has like nothing on it as for pictures or videos. We have all of those on our phones so I don’t even think I would worry about backing it up before upgrading it. I’m just curious how easy it is to downgrade it if I notice an annoying dip in performance going from Sierra to Mojave.
Yes downgrading is easy just make a usb of Sierra and install it. That machine will run Mojave just fine.
 

imagineadam

macrumors 65816
Jan 19, 2011
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Yes downgrading is easy just make a usb of Sierra and install it. That machine will run Mojave just fine.
Cool. Or just do the option command R thing after a restart? Sorry I don’t have any experience tinkering around with installing/downgrading macOS compared to iOS! I just want to know there is an easy safe way back in case the wife says “what did you do to my computer?! Put it back the way it was!!” Lol she’ll probably like dark mode. I’ve noticed Sierra will not receive security updates anymore either correct? Best time to jump on Mojave is now probably.
 
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||\||

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Nov 21, 2019
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I’ve noticed Sierra will not receive security updates anymore either correct? Best time to jump on Mojave is now probably.
Meh. I will be on Mojave long after security updates stop. For Macs, they are mostly overrated. Security and threat avoidance mainly comes down to the user, how careful and intuitive they are while accessing content.
 

BigBoy2018

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Oct 23, 2018
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Meh. I will be on Mojave long after security updates stop. For Macs, they are mostly overrated. Security and threat avoidance mainly comes down to the user, how careful and intuitive they are while accessing content.
Agreed. Seems like so many posters on these forums are obsessed with ‘security’.
The odds of your system being hacked are probably less than one in a million.

Its like a bunch of suburban houswives all getting together and freaking out, talking about their fears their child will be abducted.

.
 
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mitstoshi

macrumors regular
Nov 16, 2013
139
4
May I add one point to the general satisfaction with Mojave in this thread.
Although nothing either in hard- or in software is perfect, I am a big fan of Disk Warrior.
It just helped me an hour ago to rebuild a Mojave not willing to boot.
The problem is it only works with HFS+ volumes.
Mojave is the last OSX allowing with some turn-arounds to run in HFS+.
I know the problem with Apple updates but there is even a way to install a small utility warning when updates come.
In any case I followed the suggestion a year ago of a wise member in this forum (Fishrrman) to keep a Mojave volume in a separate drive in APFS as he called it „a mule“ should I need an Apple update only possible in APFS.
So, at least for me, my MP End 2013 will remain in Mojave :) and.certainly not enter the muddy waters of Catalina!
I am on HS 10.13.6 and wonder if I should upgrade to Mojave now. My questions are: (1) Any way to keep HFS+? If not, can you elaborate on the suggestion by Fisherman? and (2) how to solve the problem with Apple updates. Thanks in advance.
 

Jack Neill

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2015
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San Antonio Texas
I am on HS 10.13.6 and wonder if I should upgrade to Mojave now. My questions are: (1) Any way to keep HFS+? If not, can you elaborate on the suggestion by Fisherman? and (2) how to solve the problem with Apple updates. Thanks in advance.
Yes, upgrade. Carbon Copy Clone to a HFS volume. Keep a install on a external up to date and clone it back to the boot drive as updates come.
 

mitstoshi

macrumors regular
Nov 16, 2013
139
4
Yes, upgrade. Carbon Copy Clone to a HFS volume. Keep a install on a external up to date and clone it back to the boot drive as updates come.
When upgrading to Mojave, would that HFS+ volume (HS 10.13.6) be automatically converted to APFS volume? If so, should I do the CCC before upgrade? Can you expand the procedure step by step? Thanks for your response!
 

Jack Neill

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2015
568
319
San Antonio Texas
When upgrading to Mojave, would that HFS+ volume (HS 10.13.6) be automatically converted to APFS volume? If so, should I do the CCC before upgrade? Can you expand the procedure step by step? Thanks for your response!
Install an up to date install on a external drive and install CCC on it. Boot from the external, format your internal drive to HFS and then clone the install to the HFS drive and then reboot from it.
 

Codpeace

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May 13, 2011
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You gotta love English language. At first I thought you want people to guess your age but when I saw the 'oldies' are liking you post I got it.
Before long — if you’re lucky! — you’ll be making these jokes... ;-)
 
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Falhófnir

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Aug 19, 2017
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Not just the bugginess but the lack of compelling features mean I'm quite content to sit on Mojave for the full Catalina cycle. We've reached the stage yearly releases are no longer necessary, so I'd fully be behind biennial releases of macOS letting them polish and perfect each version after release, and giving them well over a year to test and polish each new OS before it's released.
 

Fishrrman

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Feb 20, 2009
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mitstoshi wrote in 34 above:
"I am on HS 10.13.6 and wonder if I should upgrade to Mojave now. My questions are: (1) Any way to keep HFS+? If not, can you elaborate on the suggestion by Fisherman?"

Because of the problems of software update not working properly with HFS+ and Mojave, I "compromised" and created an APFS partition for my OS/apps, with HFS+ partitions for my data storage.

I broke my internal drive down like this:
Boot - APFS (has OS, apps, and a stripped-down home folder)
Main - HFS+ (regular data and personal stuff)
Media - HFS+ (photos, a few other things)
Music - HFS+ self-explanatory

This seems to be working well enough for me.
I realize that for some folks, more than a single drive icon becomes confusing.
I don't mind having them at all.
 

Peadogie

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Aug 4, 2019
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Georgia, USA
I broke my internal drive down like this:
Boot - APFS (has OS, apps, and a stripped-down home folder)
Main - HFS+ (regular data and personal stuff)
Media - HFS+ (photos, a few other things)
Music - HFS+ self-explanatory
What do you see as the advantage of doing this? Is it because you don't trust APFS?
 

mitstoshi

macrumors regular
Nov 16, 2013
139
4
mitstoshi wrote in 34 above:
"I am on HS 10.13.6 and wonder if I should upgrade to Mojave now. My questions are: (1) Any way to keep HFS+? If not, can you elaborate on the suggestion by Fisherman?"

Because of the problems of software update not working properly with HFS+ and Mojave, I "compromised" and created an APFS partition for my OS/apps, with HFS+ partitions for my data storage.

I broke my internal drive down like this:
Boot - APFS (has OS, apps, and a stripped-down home folder)
Main - HFS+ (regular data and personal stuff)
Media - HFS+ (photos, a few other things)
Music - HFS+ self-explanatory

This seems to be working well enough for me.
I realize that for some folks, more than a single drive icon becomes confusing.
I don't mind having them at all.
Do I still need to have an external Mojave APFS volume to do the security updates? Seems to me that the internal boot volume with Mojave APFS Boot volume should be able to the updates?
 

Riwam

macrumors 65816
Jan 7, 2014
1,078
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Basel, Switzerland
mitstoshi wrote in 34 above:
"I am on HS 10.13.6 and wonder if I should upgrade to Mojave now. My questions are: (1) Any way to keep HFS+? If not, can you elaborate on the suggestion by Fisherman?"

Because of the problems of software update not working properly with HFS+ and Mojave, I "compromised" and created an APFS partition for my OS/apps, with HFS+ partitions for my data storage.

I broke my internal drive down like this:
Boot - APFS (has OS, apps, and a stripped-down home folder)
Main - HFS+ (regular data and personal stuff)
Media - HFS+ (photos, a few other things)
Music - HFS+ self-explanatory

This seems to be working well enough for me.
I realize that for some folks, more than a single drive icon becomes confusing.
I don't mind having them at all.
In the Web Site of dosdude1 he offers a small app which should alert users of Mojave in HFS+ when Apple brings updates.
AFAIK the updating problem in HFS+ Mojave concerns OS updates from Apple.
My Microsoft Office applications update without problems in HFS+.
My own intended „compromise“ as you call it will be from time to time to clone my HFS+ Mojave to an external APFS volume, update it when Apple offers updates and clone it back once updated to the inner HFS+ volume. Anyway most of my data, music etc. is in external drives since the only inner drive of my MP 6.1 is already sharing a Bootcamp Windiws 10.
I hope this scheme works.
- - Post merged: - -

What do you see as the advantage of doing this? Is it because you don't trust APFS?
Fishrrman will no doubt answer your question.
In my own case I kept Mojave in HFS+ because some applications I very much like and find useful in particular „DiskWarrior“ unfortunately do not work with APFS volumes. The same applies to some tools allowing me interchangeability between MacOS and NTFS Bootcamp Windows partitions although in the meantime those third party drivers had made progress regarding APFS.
Ed
 
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Argyboy

macrumors regular
Feb 26, 2017
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Dublin, Ireland
Agreed. Seems like so many posters on these forums are obsessed with ‘security’.
The odds of your system being hacked are probably less than one in a million.

Its like a bunch of suburban houswives all getting together and freaking out, talking about their fears their child will be abducted.

.
I think there's a fair amount of truth in this. The only reason I'd personally be hung up on security updates in MacOS is if I was running a machine in a business/production environment where you're looking at legal issues if you're purposely running insecure software.

For a home user, keep your browsing habits sensible and you're fine. I've got El Capitan on a Mac Pro 1,1 here, Sierra on a MacBook 2010 and I've no plans to change either to a different OS.
 
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Isamilis

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Apr 3, 2012
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What do you see as the advantage of doing this? Is it because you don't trust APFS?
I used to do this as well, in earlier Mojave. Finally, I "gave up". APFS is quite stable anyway (even FileVault APFS is quicker - slightly - compared to HFS+), why bother to make myself difficult? Unless I have specific app that only can run in HFS+.
 

Riwam

macrumors 65816
Jan 7, 2014
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Basel, Switzerland
Even if I am happy with Mojave, which I managed even to keep in HFS+ as explained in another thread, to allow me to continue to use some applications I found very useful like Disk Warrior, I am happy to keep a working High Sierra in an external bootable USB drive. It may be that my Mojave 10.14.6 in my MacPro End 2013 is not a 100% perfect and those of readers of this post are.
Be as it be, it happens on occasions that some application refuses to work with my Mojave but works nicely with my High Sierra.
That was now the case when I tried to make a backup of my Windows which shares my inner drive. For unknown reasons to me Winclone refused to do it in my Mojave, but did an image backup in High Sierra.
I believe therefore to be a good idea to keep a previous MacOS in a bootable external drive.
One never knows when a different MacOS may be handy. :)
The same applies to my old MacBook Early 2008. I am happy I keep a bootable Lion, the OS with which it came to me, in an USB stick.
Ed
 
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