The Daily Show

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Huntn, Jun 15, 2012.

  1. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
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    The Misty Mountains
    #1
    I don't normally watch this, but I'll have to add it to my viewing schedule. Last night's show (6/14/12) they ran a blurb on selenium runoff in Idaho along with two headed fish. :eek:

    I had to sign the petition on this Greater Yellowstone Coalition page.

    I just get sick to death of people who blindly promote big business, a valuable source of jobs, when it's known without doubt to be damaging the environment and ultimately us. For a different perspective ask the GOP. They'll tell you it's just a lie.
     
  2. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #2
    Big business being a boon for jobs is an illusion. In the long run, it's damaging.
     
  3. localoid, Jun 15, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2012

    localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #3
    Fish with four-eyes have been found in Appalachia for some time..

    Those mutated brown trout, with two heads, were recently found near creeks in southern Idaho polluted by selenium contamination. But fish with two eyes on each side of their head have been found in stream in the coal fields of Appalachia for some time now.

    Mountaintop removal mining, common in the Appalachian mountains of West Virginia, Virginia and Kentucky, also causes toxic levels of selenium to leach into rivers and streams. Selenium has been linked to increased cancer risk, hair loss, poorly formed nails, problems walking, reduced reflexes and circulation problems in humans.

    Mountaintop removal mining has doubled in the past eight years. It blasts the top off a mountain and pushes the excess rock to the neighboring valley to get to the coal beneath. Over the past two decades, mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia has buried more than 1,000 miles of streams.

    "We're killing fish right now with selenium pollution from mountaintop removal mining," according to Dennis Lemly, a Wake Forest University biologist. Toxic levels of selenium were found in 73 of 78 stream samples. The threat is expanding as use of this destructive process expands. Once these ecosystems are polluted, damage to the environment is permanent."

    Lemly's remarks (above) are from an article from early-2010 that warned that dead and deformed fish (including some with four eyes) indicated selenium pollution from mountaintop coal mining was causing permanent damage to the environment and poses serious health risks to humans.

    But does anyone really give a ****?

    In the photo below, the fish on top has two eyes on one side of its head. The lower fish has a deformed spine." Photos by Lemly, from the (2010) NPR article, Experts Urge Officials To End Mountaintop Mining.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #4
    And also to proper cell function. In trace amounts, it is a necessary mineral for survival. Which is not to disparage the negative effects of toxic levels.

    But it would be irresponsible to over-regulate mining corporations. They have to make a profit, if we were to force them to address the issue of their tailings, that would be burdensome, excessive regulation that could harm the economy and leave them without adequate resources to buy enough legislators an regulators.
     
  5. LumbermanSVO macrumors 65816

    Joined:
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    Denton, TX
    #5
    If you like reading about this stuff, then you should do some research on Anaconda Copper and the mining industry surrounding Butte and Anaconda, MT. It's a fascinating story that started in the 1870's and is still unfolding today.
     
  6. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #6
    Re: selenium, Sydde said:

    Water is also necessary for human survival "in trace amounts".

    But on February 26, 1972, when approximately 132,000,000 US gallons (500,000 m3) of black waste water, cresting over 30 ft high, decended upon the residents of 16 coal mining hamlets in Buffalo Creek Hollow, after the Pittston Coal Company's coal slurry impoundment dam burst (just four days after having been declared 'satisfactory' by a federal mine inspector), 125 persons were killed, 1,121 were injured, and over 4,000 were left homeless.

    Coal mining is an industry that can kill you, in at least a dozens different ways.
     
  7. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #7
    Sure, we can turn this thread into a collection of tales of the depredations of industry and progress. Like how Bill Mulholland wanted more water for LA so he stuck a straw into Owens Lake and now the people who live in that area are gagging on the dust, which is partially salted with ore tailings?
     
  8. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #8
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I got the distinct impression that the point of OP was regarding as an toxic selenium associated-problem (two-headed fish) in eastern Idaho. As I pointed out, the selenium pollution problems and mutated fish, etc. isn't confined to Idaho alone.

    Excuse me for pointing out an inconvenient fact.
     
  9. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #9
    I was aware it's necessary in trace amounts. It's even included in certain vitamin supplements as are other minerals. It was used in toning black and white photographic prints too. Apparently it's still sold for that (just googled it). Regarding regulation though, you basically have no argument. The mining corporations do a study prior to setting up a mine to see if it would be a profitable endeavor. If it's not, they go elsewhere. Parts per million and parts per billion are accepted forms of regulation when it comes to potentially toxic substances. Saying it's okay to trash the wildlife because it's profitable is just garbage. When I think of coal, I think of this stuff. It's from Wiki, but that's what google came up with when looking for images related to strip mining or surface mining.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Dweez macrumors 65816

    Dweez

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    #10
    For what it's worth, I get all of my news & political insight from The Daily Show.
     

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