The dramatic difference between the women & men's vote in 2016 U.S. Election

MadeTheSwitch

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 20, 2009
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Wow. 538 has done some number crunching by gender and the data is pretty stunning. All I have to say is thank goodness for women because apparently men are largely dumb creatures much to my dismay. :(

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/election-update-women-are-defeating-donald-trump/

It showed a massive gender split, with Clinton trailing Trump by 11 percentage points among men but leading him by 33 points among women. To put those numbers in perspective, that’s saying Trump would defeat Clinton among men by a margin similar to Dwight D. Eisenhower’s landslide victory over Adlai Stevenson in 1952, while Clinton would defeat Trump among women by a margin similar to … actually, there’s no good comparison, since no candidate has won a presidential election by more than 26 percentage points since the popular vote became a widespread means of voting in 1824.

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LizKat

macrumors 603
Aug 5, 2004
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I am kind of surprised the women of Utah still go for the guy with the potty mouth.
Social issues? I dunno. I think you and I disagreed once on my having said the Mormons wouldn't go for Trump because they were sensitive to having been persecuted for their religion in the USA earlier in our history. Anyway looks like I lost that bet! This looks like maybe they just don't want a lefty in the White House. And won't go for McMullin after all...

Boy I bet Reince Priebus really shudders at the blue map, it's almost as good as the nightmarish one of his current internal polls, where everyone votes but it's still mostly blue when done.

Good on Five Thirty Eight, that took some data crunching. I'm a little surprised at the blue map southeast coastal states, but it's nice. This is what can happen when you let women learn to read, and vote.

For the nth time I will never understand why the GOP let this happen.
 

LizKat

macrumors 603
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They spent years convincing their base to fear government and trust big business.
That's actually what has happened, isn't it. It's not only racism, xenophobia and etc. It's about bullfeathers and broken promises. Both parties, really, to both sets of used and ignored constituencies. It's going to be a bumpy ride trying to make things better for urban and rural populations that have been played for a long time and finally have got up from left and right both and tried to say "no more."

Clinton winning is not going to fix that. Both parties have to pay. I still think Clinton has a better chance to nudge things in the direction of the country's interests than does Trump. There are people on both ends of the spectrum expecting something good to happen. Between Clinton and a possibly somewhat chastened Congress, something good better happen. This is why I think Clinton's already been working through Dem surrogates in the House on the budget. We need to back off from this sort of tinderboxy feeling that has got stirred up. Things are not as bad as Trump portrays them but what is wrong is not as easy to fix as he or Clinton have suggested.
 

SLC Flyfishing

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Nov 19, 2007
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I am kind of surprised the women of Utah still go for the guy with the potty mouth.
Being from Utah I'm actually surprised as well. People are very anti-Hillary, but this Trump business has just about everyone I know bothered. I won't be shocked if 3rd party has their biggest showing ever in Utah this year.

I'm not living in Utah anymore, but my wife and I won't be voting for either of them (Hillary or Trump) this year.
 

bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
4,006
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Thank goodness for Tennessee.

Why Tennessee? If it weren't for the one senator from there who read and listened to the note his grandmother sent to him on the senate floor asking him to vote yes so she could vote for the only time in her life, we wouldn't have the 19th Amendment, as Tennessee was the last state to ratify it.

BL.
 

MadeTheSwitch

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Original poster
Apr 20, 2009
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Thank goodness for Tennessee.

Why Tennessee? If it weren't for the one senator from there who read and listened to the note his grandmother sent to him on the senate floor asking him to vote yes so she could vote for the only time in her life, we wouldn't have the 19th Amendment, as Tennessee was the last state to ratify it.

BL.
I am sure it would have happened otherwise. Women wouldn't still be sitting around waiting for the right to vote I don't think. But point noted. Unfortunately that bit of history doesn't change the outcome of Tennessee today it would seem. :(
 

bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
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I am sure it would have happened otherwise. Women wouldn't still be sitting around waiting for the right to vote I don't think. But point noted. Unfortunately that bit of history doesn't change the outcome of Tennessee today it would seem. :(
If that ratification hadn't happened, women would not have the vote, leading to those statistics that 538 mentioned. And seeing that that is a lot of the population, we men should cringe when the day comes that the women outnumber the men in this country.
But then again in certain cases, maybe not. ;)

BL.
 

MadeTheSwitch

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Original poster
Apr 20, 2009
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If that ratification hadn't happened, women would not have the vote, leading to those statistics that 538 mentioned. And seeing that that is a lot of the population, we men should cringe when the day comes that the women outnumber the men in this country.
But then again in certain cases, maybe not. ;)

BL.
Do you really think that if it hadn't been ratified then, that women would be just cooling their jets and still not have the vote nearly 100 years later?
 
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bradl

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Do you really think that if it hadn't been ratified then, that women would be just cooling their jets and still not have the vote nearly 100 years later?
Unknown. But keeping in mind that there is an amendment that was proposed back in 1789 that is still up for ratification.

Subsequently, the 27th amendment was also proposed in 1789. It was ratified in 1992.

BL.
 

MadeTheSwitch

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Apr 20, 2009
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Unknown. But keeping in mind that there is an amendment that was proposed back in 1789 that is still up for ratification.

BL.
I don't think women would have put up with that nonsense all these years. Particularly when other western countries moved forward on the issue, some even before us. I can't see women tolerating that situation for even a decade more back then, much less almost a century longer.
 
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bradl

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Jun 16, 2008
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I don't think women would have put up with that nonsense all these years. Particularly when other western countries moved forward on the issue, some even before us. I can't see women tolerating that situation for even a decade more back then, much less almost a century longer.
I would hope not..

but keep in mind that it took 89 years to realize that Blacks were people, not property..

We're still dealing with Native Americans being 'merciless Indian Savages', per the Declaration of Independence...

It took just as long after the Revolutionary War up to World War I for women to get the vote in the UK.

Sucks, but as Metallica said, Sad but True. :(

BL.
 
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Peterkro

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It took just as long after the Revolutionary War up to World War I for women to get the vote in the UK.
It's as well to remember that all men only got the same right of universal suffrage at the same election ( 1919 with the removal of the property ownership restriction ) and 25% of woman still didn't have the right to vote for another ten years ( the age restriction).
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
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Thank goodness for Tennessee.

Why Tennessee? If it weren't for the one senator from there who read and listened to the note his grandmother sent to him on the senate floor asking him to vote yes so she could vote for the only time in her life, we wouldn't have the 19th Amendment, as Tennessee was the last state to ratify it.

BL.
Fascinating. I hadn't known that story.

I am sure it would have happened otherwise. Women wouldn't still be sitting around waiting for the right to vote I don't think. But point noted. Unfortunately that bit of history doesn't change the outcome of Tennessee today it would seem. :(
If that ratification hadn't happened, women would not have the vote, leading to those statistics that 538 mentioned. And seeing that that is a lot of the population, we men should cringe when the day comes that the women outnumber the men in this country.
But then again in certain cases, maybe not. ;)

BL.
Do you really think that if it hadn't been ratified then, that women would be just cooling their jets and still not have the vote nearly 100 years later?
I have been reading this exchange with interest.

While I agree with @MadeTheSwitch that women wouldn't have waited a century, @bradl also has a point.

France didn't grant women the vote until after the Second World War, and as @Peterkro, below, correctly points out, it wasn't until after the First World War in the UK that the suffrage was extended fully and unconditionally to all men (property restrictions had applied prior to that) and all women (an age restriction applied until 1929 - the assumption being that young flipperty-gibbets would be too air-headed to be trusted with the responsibility of being able to exercise the franchise).

However, while women might not have received the full franchise in the US in 1920, had Tennessee not ratified the amendment (and it is a lovely story, @bradl), I cannot envisage any situation where the US had not granted women the the right to exercise the franchise by the outbreak of World War 2.

Moreover, certainly, in the immediate post war period, attempting to argue such a position - as a democracy - would have cost the US a lot of mortal authority and political leadership (internationally), not least because by then hardly any other democracy denied women the franchise.

It's as well to remember that all men only got the same right of universal suffrage at the same election ( 1919 with the removal of the property ownership restriction ) and 25% of woman still didn't have the right to vote for another ten years ( the age restriction).
Excellent point and post.
 
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twietee

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Jan 24, 2012
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Let's hope so, because 26% reads like way too much for me. What's up in Utah?

But I wouldn't trust this poll anyway. way to biased - putting in Trump second when he as just as much % as Hillary? C'mon now!
 
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Peterkro

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Fascinating. I hadn't known that story.







I have been reading this exchange with interest.

While I agree with @MadeTheSwitch that women wouldn't have waited a century, @bradl also has a point.

France didn't grant women the vote until after the Second World War, and as @Peterkro, below, correctly points out, it wasn't until after the First World War in the UK that the suffrage was extended fully and unconditionally to all men (property restrictions had applied prior to that) and all women (an age restriction applied until 1929 - the assumption being that young flipperty-gibbets would be too air-headed to be trusted with the responsibility of being able to exercise the franchise).

However, while women might not have received the full franchise in the US in 1920, had Tennessee not ratified the amendment (and it is a lovely story, @bradl), I cannot envisage any situation where the US had not granted women the the right to exercise the franchise by the outbreak of World War 2.

Moreover, certainly, in the immediate post war period, attempting to argue such a position - as a democracy - would have cost the US a lot of mortal authority and political leadership (internationally), not least because by then hardly any other democracy denied women the franchise.



Excellent point and post.
My post contained my usual sloppiness the election of course was 1918 although the government took power in 1919.It was also the election which saw the first female MP elected ( Countess Markievicz nee Gore-Booth was elected for Sinn Fein although as with all Sinn Fein MPs she did not take her seat.The usual answer to the first woman MP is that of the repulsive Lady Astor which is wrong).
 
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Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
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My post contained my usual sloppiness the election of course was 1918 although the government took power in 1919.It was also the election which saw the first female MP elected ( Countess Markievicz nee Gore-Booth was elected for Sinn Fein although as with all Sinn Fein MPs she did not take her seat.The usual answer to the first woman MP is that of the repulsive Lady Astor which is wrong).
Cough.

I spotted that but decided not to correct you (although I am usually insanely pedantic about such things). But well done.

And yes, Countess Markiewicz was elected to the House of Commons, declined to take her seat, and was appointed Minister for Labour in the revolutionary Irish Parliament (the First Dáil) which broke away from Westminster.

However, the state which grew out of the Irish revolution, a conservative Catholic Ireland, didn't appoint another female Government Minister until 1979, 60 years after Countess Markiewicz had been appointed to Cabinet rank.
 

Peterkro

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Aug 17, 2004
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Cough.

I spotted that but decided not to correct you (although I am usually insanely pedantic about such things). But well done.

And yes, Countess Markiewicz was elected to the House of Commons, declined to take her seat, and was appointed Minister for Labour in the revolutionary Irish Parliament (the First Dáil) which broke away from Westminster.

However, the state which grew out of the Irish revolution, a conservative Catholic Ireland, didn't appoint another female Government Minister until 1979, 60 years after Countess Markiewicz had been appointed to Cabinet rank.
Yes well we all know the colossal F up that the free-staters created.1918 should be burnt on my brain cells because that election is the legal basis for a 32 county Ireland (yet to be achieved).
 
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