The Early 2011, Late 2011, Mid 2012 Retina, and Early 2013 Retina Repair Program

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Yebubbleman, Mar 20, 2015.

  1. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #1
    Regarding the recent Apple Repair Extension Program out for the GPUs of (the main logic boards) for the following machines:

    - MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011)

    - MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2011)

    - MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)

    -MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2011)

    - MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)

    - MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013)

    ...I have a couple of questions (for anyone that might know more about this and/or have some insight):

    1. I notice that the "MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)" is absent from the list of affected machines. Why is that? Doesn't it otherwise share the same discrete GPU as the Mid 2012 and Early 2013 15" Retinas? Is it likely that those issues will crop up for those machines down the road? (Beyond curiosity, I do have a vested interest given that I own said machine).

    2. I assume the failures between the 2011 MacBook Pros and those of the aforementioned retina machines are, in essence, totally different given that it's two different makes and brands of GPUs going in two differently designed sets of notebook computers. Is it pure coincidence or is my understanding wrong and this is some sort of linked issue between the two sets of machines?

    3. I'm fully aware of the issues that would happen on the aforementioned Early and Late 2011 MacBook Pros, but what was the sort of issues that would happen on the Mid 2012 and Early 2013 15" Retinas? Was it common? I don't remember hearing anything about those machines prior to the announcement of the repair extension program, hence my curiosity.
     
  2. dreamsINdigital macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    #2
    I think the general issue here is that over time, heat is causing lead-free solder to break down, which is used to connect the discrete GPU to the logic board. This in turn is causing the graphical issues we see. As far as I know, all MacBook Pros with discrete GPUs, regardless of brand, are built this way with lead-free solder. Therefore, all MacBook Pros with discrete GPUs are potentially vulnerable to this issue, to some extent.

    I'm thinking that some MacBook Pros/GPUs run cooler than others, so the issue is less apparent in certain models. I haven't heard of it being a widespread issue with the Retina MacBook Pros.
     
  3. Tankmaze macrumors 68000

    Tankmaze

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    #3
    I will assume that any macbook pro that has dgpu will probably fail at some point. I owned the 15" mbp with 8600m gt (the ticking time bomb mac), never had any issue with it and sold it before any problem occur.

    And then I upgraded to mbp which has nvidia 9600m this card has no known issue but I did have the gpu failed and got replaced by apple care. And then I upgraded to my current late 2011 mbp with the amd 6750m, which thankfully apple has given me a peace of mind until february 27, 2016.

    Now I will list all discrete gpu mbp 15" from 2010, which I think problematic:

    2010: nvidia 330m, don't know if its widespread but I know there are many failed mbp's
    2011: obviously both amd 6750 and 6770
    2012: nvidia 650m, if this will fail on rmbp, it will fail with the cmbp
    2013: nvidia 750m which some people say a rebadged version of 650m, I don't know how this card will fail since its to early to tell.
    2014: still nvidia 750m

    So, if I were you I would check the temp on the mbp, keep it clean from dust, basically put an extra attention with the heat dissipation because your mbp with 650m chip is the same chip as found in the rmbp.

    I'm not spreading fud but it seems apple track record with discrete gpu has never been good. I know that my next mac would be the 15" skylake mbp with integrated gpu which I hope would last me a long time.
     

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