The inventor of Li-ion batteries is developing a vastly superior battery technology

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by Tig Bitties, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. Tig Bitties macrumors 68030

    Tig Bitties

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    #1
    https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/05/goodenough-solid-battery-technology/

    It's safer, can store more energy and can last much longer.

    Together with fellow researcher Maria Helena Braga, the 94-year-old professor recently led an engineering team which apparently developed a vastly superior alternative to li-ion batteries.

    The new power cells use solid glass electrolytes instead of the liquid found in its lithium-ion counterparts. This means that these batteries are much safer, as there won't be any explosions or fires happening due to the formation of dendrites (small “metal whiskers” which can form and cause a short circuit if a li-ion battery is charged too fast).

    However, safety isn't the only advantage of these solid-state power cells. They have at least three times as much energy density compared to li-ion batteries, while also boasting much faster recharge rates, greater number of charging/discharging cycles, and the ability to perform well in subzero conditions (-20 degrees Celsius or -4 degrees Fahrenheit). Another major benefit with the new batteries is the fact that they can be manufactured in a cheap and eco-friendly way, as the glass electrolytes allow for the substitution of lithium for low-cost sodium which can be found just about anywhere.
     
  2. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #2
    Solid state batteries are the next big thing in battery tech. I'm glad we dumped $100 million in research grants, without them we'd still be focusing on tweaking the 30 year legacy of li-ion instead of focusing on new chemistries and electrolytes.
     
  3. Tig Bitties thread starter macrumors 68030

    Tig Bitties

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  4. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    3-5 years for full deployment. This has been in the R&D Labs in universities (thanks to research grants from the US government) for at least 5 years as I keep seeing it pop up every few months. Now they're onto the "how do we scale up manufacturing to bring the price down" phase, which usually takes about 2ish years.
     
  5. Tinmania macrumors 68040

    Tinmania

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    If I had a nickel for every time I heard this....

    I would absolutely be thrilled if this time it was true. But color me a skeptic.


    Mike
     
  6. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #6
    By all means, be skeptical, it's best to be so when it comes to product pipelines. That said, the acceleration I've been witnessing over the last several years (again, because of our taxpayer dollars going to research at universities which then get sold off to private companies) makes me optimistic in this regard.
     
  7. C DM macrumors Westmere

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    #7
    I remember a few years ago there were talks of graphene being the next breakthrough battery technology/advancement. Not quite sure where that is these days as not much has surfaced about it since then.
     
  8. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    The problem with graphene is producing it in purity at a mass scale. By definition it has to be one atom thick or it's a different material (which, in finding failed ways to produce it, have resulted in another material that is highly useful in other applications). There's progress made every other day practically, but graphene itself is sound. It's the manufacturing of it that's the bottleneck right now, unfortunately.
     
  9. Tinmania macrumors 68040

    Tinmania

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    #9
    Just a few off the top of my head: hydrogen fuel cells (oldie but goodie), a123, lithium Air, lithium superoxide.



    Mike
     
  10. 960design macrumors 68020

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    #10
    These have been in development for quite some time ( quick search ):
    http://gizmodo.com/3-new-kinds-of-battery-that-just-might-change-the-world-1713221624

    They keep the 'secret sauce' hidden in the discussion, but most people knew this was in the works for the last several years. If I remember correctly, lab = yes, production = no. It would seem that this young lady believes she has conquered the production side.
     
  11. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

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    My knee-jerk reaction to headlines of this sort is, "Not another perpetual motion machine story!" This ain't that, but power generation/storage does have a long line of "close, but no cigar" technologies. How are we doing with commercial fusion reactors? How about high-efficiency low-cost solar cells? It's not that they can't happen, it always seems to be the challenge of going from lab to large scale. This is really hard stuff, sometimes requiring exotic materials, and perhaps unexpected, enabling breakthroughs in other fields. I've learned to not hold my breath. Just let me know when it arrives.
     
  12. UltimaKilo macrumors 6502

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    #12
    "A new and more powerful generation of batteries may be made entirely from glass, according to the conclusions of Goodenough and his team of researchers published by the U.K. Royal Society of Chemistry. They store and transmit energy at temperatures lower than traditional lithium-ion packs and can be made using globally abundant supplies of sodium.

    The research could result in “a safe, low-cost all-solid-state cell with a huge capacity giving a large energy density and a long cycle life suitable for powering an all-electric road vehicle or for storing electric power from wind or solar energy,” the researchers wrote in the peer-reviewed journal Energy & Environmental Science."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...hmidt-flags-promise-of-new-goodenough-battery
     
  13. Tech198 macrumors G4

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    #13
    So what this is saying, its more user-friendly.... the options are open to fast charge as speedy as u like without damage, or at least allot faster than fast.. Apple will be all over this.

    Exploding batteries will be a thing of the past..... Manufactures will have to find a new way to do their recalls.. and pin it on some "other hardware" design issue.
     

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