The JFK Legacy 50 years later.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacNut, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #1
    There have been a lot of specials on TV the past few weeks and that got me thinking. How would we judge John F. Kennedy's presidency 50 years after his assassination. Was he a good president or would we never know since he only lasted 3 years into his first term. Would he have won reelection and how would the country have changed had he lived. Would we still think as highly of him as we do now if he was able to finish out his term.

    His first year was full of missteps and blunders. How would history have seen him had he had a full term and possibly 2? Vietnam, The Bay of Pigs, not in his favor. The way he handled the riots in the south. But he got us on the road to the moon. Are there more what if's or can we give an accurate grade on his legacy.
     
  2. Sydde macrumors 68020

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    #2
    not to mention C. S. Lewis and Aldus Huxley, who died on the very same day as Kennedy. I know that both of those men had an impact on my life that was at least as great as Kennedy. Possibly greater.
     
  3. whoknows87 macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    The question still remains who killed Kennedy, was it oswald? or possibly LBJ? sounds a bit crazy , but you never know.. as far as his legacy who knows as a senator he voted against a civil rights bill, he was reluctant on many issues and civil rights was definitely one of them, looks like everything JFK did was mainly politics appease here and there to win office pre presidency and to secure another term
     
  4. localoid, Nov 17, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013

    localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #4
    History doesn't seem to agree with you in regards to Kennedy and civil rights.

    JFK did vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1957, however, many African American leaders of the era, including Philip Randolph, Ralph J. Bunche, and , and Jackie Robinson opposed the bill, some of them saying the bill had become so "watered down" that it had been rendered incapable of achieving its goals.

    Kennedy appointed an unprecedented number of African Americans to high-level positions in the administration. He strengthened the Civil Rights Commission, spoke out in favor of school desegregation, praised a number of cities for integrating their schools, and put Vice President Lyndon Johnson in charge of the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity. Attorney General Robert Kennedy initiated five times the number of suits brought during the previous administration in regards to voting rights. [source]
     
  5. Huntn macrumors G5

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    #5
    Which leaves us to speculate. :)
     
  6. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    Actually, we do know.

    LBJ was riding in a limo two cars behind Kennedy. If he had shot Kennedy, he would have been seen by hundreds of people, not the least of which would be those riding in the limo with him.
     
  7. Huntn macrumors G5

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    #7
    Recently saw another documentary that pushed the notion that Oswald could have easily been the lone gunman. He was a good shot and that from the Book Depository, it was not that difficult of a shot.
     
  8. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #8
    Ya I saw that one too. I am less inclined to believe there was a second shooter but the question is who put him up to it.
     
  9. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #9
    Looks like this is going to turn into a "Who Killed Kennedy" thread.

    While his death is part of his legacy (sort of), is that all there is to his time as President...good and bad?
     
  10. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #10
    His first 18 months in office were bad, some might argue they were the worst ever for a sitting president. Then he turned it around. Do his accomplishments outweigh his bad decisions?
     
  11. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #11
    "The question still remains who killed Kennedy ..."

    No it doesn't, Mick answered it decades ago,

    I shouted out, "Who killed the Kennedys?"
    When after all, it was you and me
     
  12. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

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    #12
    Sympathy for the Devil....

    I love that song.:D
     
  13. Sydde macrumors 68020

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    #13
    So, suppose we find out the Kennedy assassination was plotted and carried out by some shadowy Tri-Bilderburg Flouridationist MI9 Cabal, what then? What would we propose to do about it? It just seems to me that a lot of ink and leather have been wasted on an effort that is focused on an, in the grand scheme, ultimately fairly trivial event.

    By which I mean, there are issues we can do something about, which affect our lives today, the death of Kennedy is done, a distraction from what we should be paying attention to.
     
  14. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    If Kennedy hadn't been shot, the country would probably have moved more quickly on the civil rights front, and perhaps set the country toward more progressive reforms. We would have a government that does more for average people.
     
  15. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    Can you support this with some specific references to actions taken by Kennedy that leads you to these conclusions?
     
  16. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #16
    Kennedy had to deal with an extremely conservative Democrat base in the south. He would have had a tough time getting any real civil rights reforms passed.
     
  17. Renzatic Suspended

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    #17
    Probably. It's also possible we would've been mired in Vietnam far deeper than we ended up being under his leadership.

    History has shown us that Kennedy was an excellent domestic president, probably one of our greatest in recent history, but was terrible, terrible, horrible at balancing foreign affairs.
     
  18. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    The man very clearly supported civil rights and other causes like affordable housing. He attended the opening ceremony of a middle class housing development in NYC (Penn South)--no other President has done that--or probably will in the near future. It would offend the free market anarchists.

    http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/ILGWU/archives/filmVideo/index.html?defaultVideoID=7
     
  19. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

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    #19
    Did he ever do that in Alabama? Supporting Civil Rights and being able to get things done are two different things. His own party was against it in the 60's.
     
  20. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    He verbally supported civil rights and through his contacts get Reverend Martin Luther King released from prison. He also signed Executive Order 10925--which basically required government contractors to enforce affirmative action. He did a lot more--pop out a history book.
     
  21. localoid macrumors 68020

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    #21
    Your version of history doesn't seem to jive with the actual historical record.

    Do you recall learning anything about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 when you were in school?

    It was " a landmark piece of civil rights legislation in the United States that outlawed major forms of discrimination against racial, ethnic, national and religious minorities, and women. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public (known as 'public accommodations')".

    I'm going to cut-n-paste a good deal about the bill below, since you seem to be unfamiliar with the bill and the events that actually took place during the 1960s.

     
  22. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #22
    But would those things have alienated the southern base? Were those things enough to not get him reelected?

    ----------

    JFK was also holding his feet on those issues because they were getting in the way of his foreign policy. He didn't want to deal with it at first.
     
  23. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    I don't think so, because he did avoid too much association with the grass roots movement toward civil rights. He declined an invitation to speak at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom for the very reason you cite.
     
  24. localoid, Nov 18, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013

    localoid macrumors 68020

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    #24
    If this is to be considered anything other than a layman's opinion, then a citation to a source supporting your theory is needed.

    And yet, Kennedy and some of his administration officials meet with leaders of the March On Washington and posed for a publicity pic rleased in Aug. of 1963.

    [​IMG]

    And previous to that....

    "After the March, the speakers traveled to the White House for a brief discussion of proposed civil rights legislation with President Kennedy.[111] Kennedy had watched King's speech on TV and was very impressed. According to biographer Thomas C. Reeves, Kennedy "felt that he would be booed at the March, and also didn't want to meet with organizers before the March because he didn't want a list of demands. He arranged a 5 P.M. meeting at the White House with the 10 leaders on the 28th."[112] The March was considered a "triumph of managed protest" and Kennedy felt it was a victory for him as well—bolstering the chances for his civil rights bill." [source]
     
  25. Sydde macrumors 68020

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    #25
    I am quite skeptical. Johnson pushed quite hard to get the civil rights act passed (it was reported out of committee in the fall of '63 and signed in the spring of '64). What I remember of Johnson was that he was at least as empathetic to the common man and the poor as Kennedy, pushing Head Start, food stamps and Medicare. In today's political landscape, he easily might be seen as to the left of Pelosi, Schumer and Biden.
     

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