The Left and Right in WALL-E

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by nbs2, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    #1
    A movie critic I follow closely recently posted his thoughts on the religious and environmentalist messages in WALL-E. He brought up some interesting points that we all could do well to consider.

    How does hearing/reading about the strong religious faith of Andrew Stanton affect your opinion of the film? Does that opinion change even though Stanton states that while his faith affects his baseline filmmaking, it played no intentional role in his development of this movie?

    How about the environmentalist message? Does this make you feel preached to/like it is part of your choir, or does it exist in the background? Again, how do Stanton's claims that any message was incidental to developing a strong plot affect your feelings?

    I went into the movie aware of both "messges," and while I noticed the environmental more than the religious (I thought her name was actually Eva until they were back on the ship). Yet, neither seems to be part of the storyline. I noticed the messages of stopping to see what is around us, that love is not effortless, and that it is never too late to fix a problem more than anything else. Oh, and that we have too many satellites.

    NB: I am surprised I could't find a thread on this, and wanted this thread to discuss the "messages" of the movie rather than the quality of the movie itself (which, I believe is such that it should join B&tB on the nominee list, maybe crack a winner based on the reast of the year).
     
  2. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #2
    Not to be rude, but can't we just leave a nice movie alone? Does everything have to be politicized? That's not to say we can't discuss it, but it seems to me that we sometimes do this too much.
     
  3. nbs2 thread starter macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    Sorry, I should have been clearer in my post. I was just curious to see if anybody outside of the rabid message-finders were seeing these messages and/or was changing opinions based on the supposed messages. I suppose a poll would have been sufficient.

    Having heard about them, I still didn't see them.
     
  4. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #4
    Oops! I misunderstood. We agree then. ;)
     
  5. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

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    #5
    I saw the environmental message and criticisms of a consumer culture in it, but neither of those were critical in my enjoyment of the movie, and probably weren't too obvious to the children watching.
     
  6. bc008 macrumors 68000

    bc008

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    #6
    i got the environmental.. not the religious? care to explain?
     
  7. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #7
    Andrew Stanton gave an interesting interview with WORLD Magazine that touches on these issues. http://www.worldmag.com/articles/14127

    I agree. When Lilah got pregnant in Ctrl+Alt+Del, a lot of people around the Intertubes were saying that Tim Buckley must be a coward if it ended in anything except for Lilah having an abortion. When they didn't have an abortion but a couple of months later, she miscarried, the dull roar reached deafening levels, saying that Mr. Buckley took the easy way out. He met this with greater aplomb than I would have, explaining on his website that it was the way he had this storyline planned out years in advance. I would have said, "**** you wankers, it's MY work of art and I'm not creating it for the purpose of saying anything either for or against abortion."

    One thing that's worth remembering is that every serious director brings a vision to a project and has a message that he wants to convey. It bothers me when people tell others that a film is not worth watching on account of a message that they disagree with. If you disagree with the message of a film, it's far more constructive to attack the message, rather than telling people they shouldn't watch it. The former can spark a spirited debate; the latter is simply telling people to put their heads in the sand.
     
  8. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

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    #8
    I noticed the environmental part of WALL-E too! There were a lot of important messages.

    1. Take care of our planet.
    2. Take care of our bodies.
    3. Don't rely on machines to do everything for us.
    Etc, etc.

    On a side note, WALL-E proved that you don't need language to understand what's going on. Even tho WALL-E and Eve didn't talk, you knew what was going on between them. Love.
     
  9. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #9
    While a director may have a vision, if the producers, ie the ones who control the money, disagree with that vision, the director may not see his vision become reality.

    Rather than harp on the public or the critics, you'd do better to attack the movie financing system in the US. A lot of good movies go unmade simply because the producers aren't willing to finance the message the film carries. Risk taking in film making is now left up to the indies, not the majors.
     
  10. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #10
    I think WALL•E very much wears it's "politics" on it's sleeve. I completely missed any religious messages, though.

    (More importantly, I must say that I thought it was a beautiful - BEAUTIFUL! - film. I almost cried at the end... :eek: )
     
  11. Don't panic macrumors 603

    Don't panic

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    #11
    interesting premise.

    in my opinion, the environmentalist/healthist angle is very clear and very broad and so universally obvious and unquestionable that is barely a 'message'.

    i don't think that there is any religious 'message' at all. what would that be?

    there are references to biblical stories/characters (Eve, the Ark/Axxiom, the olive branch/plant, did I miss anything else?), as there are references to other stories/characters from other sources that constitute the make-up of our culture (of which the bible is an important part, even for atheists).
    but i don't see any 'divine' presence in it. If anything it is an eminently humanistic story (with the paradox that the most human characters are machines). Indeed, one could as likely find an anti-religious message in it.

    this story, like most good stories, has many layers and there is some for everyone.
    I am sure there will be interpretations suggesting the most bizarre scaffold for this film and maybe the entire PIXAR production (i can already see some doctoral thesis titled "post-christian symbolism in PIXAR's decalogue", after the next ones), but it will mostly be a wishfull-thinking excercise.
    If you look at the world through purple glasses, everything will appear purple.

    you can read this stuff in many ways, but the fact that the writers are educated and clever doesn't mean they have an hidden agenda other than producing a great movie full of little surprises for who likes to look for them.
     

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