The Pope gives a speach on "TED"

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by PracticalMac, Apr 26, 2017.

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  1. PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #1
    The Pope gives a speech on "TED", simply saying tech needs to focus on bringing people together.

    It is great that a religious leader encourage tech for better social support and respect and respects science.
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #2
    Wow.

    What can I say, but "cool"?

    When was this recorded? And broadcast?
     
  3. yaxomoxay macrumors 68020

    yaxomoxay

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    #3
    I admit that this is surprising! Bergoglio does know how to use communication methods.
     
  4. PracticalMac thread starter macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #4
    He is an incredibly curious and inquisitive person, so different to previous Popes, and what is upsetting to many in the church.
     
  5. yaxomoxay macrumors 68020

    yaxomoxay

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    I don't like his theology, but he's a good communicator. I give him that.
    As for how he is inside the Church... he's basically a tyrant.
     
  6. steve knight macrumors 68020

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    can you imagine how this will be decried as horrible by the fundamentalist Catholics? good for the pope.
     
  7. elistan macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    The last day or two, sounds like.
    "Filmed April 2017 at TED2017"
     
  8. PracticalMac thread starter macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    Actually, I hear that Cardinal Raymond Burke is the tyrant.
    Have not seen anything to say P Frances is.
     
  9. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    At least he's stuck to his Jesuit teachings. Catholics, much like other Christians or any other religious people these days have a pick and choose mentality.
     
  10. smallcoffee macrumors 65816

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    Yeah nothing bad to say here about this. Watched the talk and glad I did.
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

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    And the Roman Catholic Church is a democracy?

    The Pope - any and all of them - has always had the powers of an autocrat, - and most of them have had the instincts of an authoritarian - so, yes, some have become tyrants on the strength of that.
     
  12. yaxomoxay macrumors 68020

    yaxomoxay

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    I am obviously not talking about the legal aspect - albeit there is something to say even about that, as the debacle with the Sacred Order of Malta revealed - but about his behavior. Talk to anyone who works close to him and they will tell you horror stories, how he removes priests because he doesn't like how they look, or because they ask the wrong question, and stuff like that. Compared to what they say about Ratzinger (very mild... probably a bit too much), or John Paul II, the difference is striking. John Paul II was loved by virtually everyone.
     
  13. Scepticalscribe Contributor

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    #13
    Interesting perspective.

    Not by me.
     
  14. yaxomoxay macrumors 68020

    yaxomoxay

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    #14
    Really? Of course I respect your opinion - after all a pontiff is also a political figure - but may I ask why?
     
  15. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #15
    His stance on matters relating to women such as contraception, divorce, abortion, (which has an impact in countries with a conservative Catholic culture such as Ireland and Malta - delaying access to such rights) and on other matters, such as gay rights, not to mention his authoritarian instincts and old-fashioned preferences on matters of doctrine, such as reiterating the doctrine of Palpal Infallibility (on certain issues), and the almost obscene number of saints he added to the calendar.

    Now, on Eastern Europe, I came to the realisation that he was a more sophisticated and subtle political actor than I had originally thought, and his influence on political developments in Poland - by far the most important and powerful of the countries of central and eastern Europe - was profound.
     
  16. yaxomoxay, Apr 27, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017

    yaxomoxay macrumors 68020

    yaxomoxay

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    #16
    Fair enough. However please realize that he was the first pope to explain that a woman looking for abortions is not a full fledged murderer but oftentimes a victim of society's pressure. I have to point out this to many of my fellow Catholics that apply the "murderer" label with disturbing ease. Even if I am against abortions, I do realize that more often than not pregnant women are seen as if they contracted the plague, especially if they're very young. Pregnant teens are left alone by friends, school, and often even the parents. While certainly I do recognize the importance of the consequences of personal choices, that's no execuse to leave a woman to herself just because she got pregnant, especially if we "fight" for the unborn child.
    John Paul was strongly against abortion, as Bergoglio is, but if you notice he never really blamed the mothers (except those who used it basically as a contraceptive, as a woman I met when I was at the hospital for my heart surgery. She was having her fifth abortion because she "don't like pills or modifying the body.") but almost always pointed out the hypocrisy of our society about it. In other words, he moved the issue from a personal choice issue (which still stands true of course), to a societal issue. I think that he defined abortion as the "silent scream", probably for that reason.
    That was extremely important for the Church and probably Christianity in general. By doing so, John Paul was also able to open up for the redemption/forgiveness/acceptance of those women.
    You have no idea how many "fights" I had with Catholics that don't understand the greater impact of what John Paul underlined.
     

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