The redesign of the pill bottle

bousozoku

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I recently got a prescription at Target. Who knew that they would be cheaper than Wal-Mart? :)

In any case, I was amazed that they're using a new bottle that has the opening at the bottom and the shape is totally different and seems much more sturdy. As you can see, it uses a ring (mine is yellow) that is used to separate one family members meds from the others. It's simple and ingenious. Besides, all that, it's in red--something very much Target.
 

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MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
bousozoku said:
I recently got a prescription at Target. Who knew that they would be cheaper than Wal-Mart? :)

In any case, I was amazed that they're using a new bottle that has the opening at the bottom and the shape is totally different and seems much more sturdy. As you can see, it uses a ring (mine is yellow) that is used to separate one family members meds from the others. It's simple and ingenious. Besides, all that, it's in red--something very much Target.
Seems like a good idea... Store the bottle upside down. Flip it upright to open it tilt it down to tip out a pill for your RSI. Tilt it upright to put the lid back on. Flip it upside down to store it.

Then there is all the little pill dust that comes off of the none coated ones with all that shaking. I get buzzed just opening my bottle of xanax as is.
 

yg17

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Aug 1, 2004
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I work at Target and knew about that a couple months ago. Clever, but I wish they would have taken the money they spent redesigning the pill bottle and given us a nice raise :D
 

tobefirst

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Jan 24, 2005
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I read about this a few days ago. The overarching idea is, of course, to differentiate it from the thousands of places you can go to fill a prescription. But specifically, because of the shape of the bottle, they are able to provide much more information (or at least the same information at a larger size) directly on the bottle. This is important for safety reasons. Additionally, as you mentioned, bousozoku, the colored rings help family members identify their medicines more quickly. I say it's an ingenious idea as well!
 

yg17

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tobefirst said:
I read about this a few days ago. The overarching idea is, of course, to differentiate it from the thousands of places you can go to fill a prescription. But specifically, because of the shape of the bottle, they are able to provide much more information (or at least the same information at a larger size) directly on the bottle. This is important for safety reasons. Additionally, as you mentioned, bousozoku, the colored rings help family members identify their medicines more quickly. I say it's an ingenious idea as well!
Yep, thats one of several reasons for it.

Liquid medicine bottles were also redesigned for Target and include those things that are like a syringe except don't have a needle for you to measure out how much medicine you need.
 

wdlove

macrumors P6
Oct 20, 2002
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I think that this redesign of the medicine bottle is a great idea. Its the first redesign in 40 years. The inventor of this design was on TV about a month ago. She described it as design of love. Invention because of all the current problems that now occur. This should prevent a lot of errors both at the pharmacy and at home. My hope is that this design will be adopted pharmacy wide.

http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/health/features/11700/
 

Lacero

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Jan 20, 2005
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Is it easier to open? It would be great relief for arthritis suffers.
 

iSaint

macrumors 603
yg17 said:
I work at Target and knew about that a couple months ago. Clever, but I wish they would have taken the money they spent redesigning the pill bottle and given us a nice raise :D
I would think Target did not spend the money on this redevelopment; but, rather, a pill bottle supplier proposed the new design to them. Wait to see this bottle in other stores soon.
 

PlaceofDis

macrumors Core
Jan 6, 2004
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i hadn't heard about that, but its interesting, i wonder if it will catch on, and as others have asked, is it easier to open? that will be one of the main factors in my opinion.
 

bousozoku

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Lacero said:
Is it easier to open? It would be great relief for arthritis suffers.
Yes. Even though both bottles have screw caps, the shape makes it easier to maintain a grasp. You'd think pickle bottles should come in such a shape. :)
 

yg17

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Aug 1, 2004
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iSaint said:
I would think Target did not spend the money on this redevelopment; but, rather, a pill bottle supplier proposed the new design to them. Wait to see this bottle in other stores soon.
According to my boss at Target, and the literature they gave us about it, Target paid big bucks for the design, so its probably patented and won't be seen in other pharmacies for awhile
 

Daveway

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Jul 10, 2004
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bousozoku said:
Yes. Even though both bottles have screw caps, the shape makes it easier to maintain a grasp. You'd think pickle bottles should come in such a shape. :)
My 79 year old grandmaw is always bit*hing she can't get the bottles open for her meds. Why do senior citizens need child protection caps?
 

bousozoku

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Daveway said:
My 79 year old grandmaw is always bit*hing she can't get the bottles open for her meds. Why do senior citizens need child protection caps?
They don't and at Target, they won't get them, if they don't want them. My parents never get them from Walgreens or Wal-Mart either but you have to say something.
 
L

Lau

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3769337.stm

The link above shows some pretty clever ways of rethinking 'childproof'. Instead of the current "rely on brute strength, grip and luck" that isn't very elderly-friendly, these are all ways of being physically easy, but things kids wouldn't think of or can't do, like push a button inside a tube that only an adult finger would be long enough to reach.
 

MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
Lau said:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3769337.stm

The link above shows some pretty clever ways of rethinking 'childproof'. Instead of the current "rely on brute strength, grip and luck" that isn't very elderly-friendly, these are all ways of being physically easy, but things kids wouldn't think of or can't do, like push a button inside a tube that only an adult finger would be long enough to reach.
So we just make it into a puzzle toy for 4 and 5 year olds to try and open with the promise of pretty candy inside.

Why am I so bitter on this?
 

rainman::|:|

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Feb 2, 2002
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i've never understood why they don't make a pill bottle for older people, using the same $1 worth of parts that novelty candy dispensers use, that dispenses a single pill at the push of a button, maybe put an electronic counter in it, or a red blinking light to signify that a pill has not yet been taken today. It might add $1.50 or $2 to the cost of a prescription, but perhaps they'd be refillable or something... i've known older people that sometimes went without medication rather than call someone to open their pill bottles... arthritis medication in a child-resistant bottle, that's cruel.
 

Moof1904

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May 20, 2004
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I'm not sure if it's true or not, but I read something somewhere that while child poisonings by medications decreased immediately after the introduction of childproof caps, they then began to rise again and are now quite near what they were before childproof caps were introduced.

The study attributed this trend to people no longer keeping medicines inaccessbile to children, relying instead entirely on the childproof caps to keep their children safe from poisonings.
 

takao

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Dec 25, 2003
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Lau said:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3769337.stm

The link above shows some pretty clever ways of rethinking 'childproof'. Instead of the current "rely on brute strength, grip and luck" that isn't very elderly-friendly, these are all ways of being physically easy, but things kids wouldn't think of or can't do, like push a button inside a tube that only an adult finger would be long enough to reach.
why am i suddenly reminded of the ending of that absolute hilarious movie "hey dude where's my car" you know using sticks to push the button ;)

and the slide thing is a joke right ? that's easier to solve than some <6 years puzzles i have at home

putting the stuff somewhere where they don'T see it and can't get easy (liek somwhere high up in the room) is way better protection than leaving something, which looks like a toy , on the kitchen table
 

wdlove

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Oct 20, 2002
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yg17 said:
According to my boss at Target, and the literature they gave us about it, Target paid big bucks for the design, so its probably patented and won't be seen in other pharmacies for awhile
I think that this new system is very revolutionary for its safety feature. One of those things that shouldn't be held by one company. In reality if everyone went to Target fort he new design they couldn't handle the job. They need to be beneficent about this new design.
 

bousozoku

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takao said:
why am i suddenly reminded of the ending of that absolute hilarious movie "hey dude where's my car" you know using sticks to push the button ;)

and the slide thing is a joke right ? that's easier to solve than some <6 years puzzles i have at home

putting the stuff somewhere where they don'T see it and can't get easy (liek somwhere high up in the room) is way better protection than leaving something, which looks like a toy , on the kitchen table
Smart parents and grandparents? Who would have thought of that? Sometimes, I think people should have to have a licence to have children. :D
 
L

Lau

Guest
takao said:
putting the stuff somewhere where they don'T see it and can't get easy (liek somwhere high up in the room) is way better protection than leaving something, which looks like a toy , on the kitchen table
Yeah, I must admit, that's what I think too. I was watching a programme about people addicted to painkillers even though there was nothing wrong with them and a woman on it (who took a shedload of ibruprofen every day for no reason at all) said "my grandaughter knows to bring Grandma her pills every hour". All I could think of was - a 6 year old shouldn't have access to a ton of painkillers. Never mind what she's going to think when her grandma eats them all day and the kid might think they're harmless. And they're only in blister packs.

The only thing I would think about that link is that they are at least trying new ways to work out medication for people who can't open childproof lids. The only other option at the moment is to either not have a childproof lid at all (which is fine until your grandkids come round) or to put it in another bottle (same problem, but you could also confuse your medication or forget the dosage). I think the people in the article are on the right track, but the prototypes are too easy and too toy like. But with a bit more development I think they could be good.
 

Awimoway

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Sep 13, 2002
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I think it's a smart design for most plastic bottles. I hate it when a soap bottle, dressing bottle, etc. runs low and grows top-heavy because of the lid way up at the top. They knock over too easily.

Of course, bottles with lids on the bottom aren't always ideal. I despise the plastic Heinz catsup bottle with the lid on the bottom. You have to squeeze the hell out of it to get anything, and when it comes, it suddenly gushes out at an odd angle -- usually onto my shirt. :rolleyes:
 

Abstract

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Dec 27, 2002
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Bottles don't need a new "design", if you can call this bottle a new design. I have lots of things that shape. Its just that making it a solid plastic material and putting pills in it is new.

Also, if the only reason to have this bottle is to put the ring on it, I'd like to say that you can make a ring and put it on current bottles to distinguish meds between family members. No biggie. I don't feel the same excitement as you folks, I guess.
 

janey

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Dec 20, 2002
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package design is always interesting. one of my asthma meds comes in this really weird purple disk-shaped hunk of plastic that you could essentially just throw around until you need it. then you just snap it into place, push the lever thing back until you hear a click and then breathe in deeply. it's _really_ easy to use, it's more convenient and it's even environment-friendly.

like i said, package design is always interesting. :)