The Rising Threat Of Police Malfeasance And Criminality

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by RootBeerMan, Jul 27, 2018.

  1. RootBeerMan macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #1
    Time and again, day after day, I am seeing more and more criminal and bad behaviour by American police. Off hand, I'd say I see at least two, and sometimes more, reports of this. While some police are actually arrested for their actions, it is very few. Most manage to skate for their actions or suffer only a paid vacation. In many of the worst cases they may be fired or forced to resign, but they face no criminal charges, as we would had we committed the same offence. This is something we, as a nation really need to address. It used to be that these events were supposedly the cause of a few bad apples, but now it's looking more and more like a significant number of these apples are bad, and the so called good cops are remaining silent, in many cases. The police are becoming the standing army the founders warned us about.

    Here are two that came across my feed in the last half hour.

    Framing innocent citizens.

    http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-brief...mits-to-framing-two-black-men-at-direction-of

    Beating an innocent man. Fortunately, the officers have been arrested. But will they actually be convicted?

    https://news.vice.com/en_us/article...a-fake-american-could-face-hate-crime-charges
     
  2. widgeteer Suspended

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    #2
    Systemic racism within police depts across the country is one of the biggest threats to a fair and functional society. If a large portion of our populace cannot have faith in those who are deemed "protectors", we've failed miserably.
     
  3. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #3
    Having had my own personal glimpse into the life of an LEO, I'm not sure if it's systemic racisim, or just down right combat fatigue. I've seen the progression of cops from an open friendly kind of person to a jadded 'cuff 'em all' cop after years of working a beat. What ever it is we need to address the problem that some cops out there are flipping out on the job and the damage is citizen rights and freedoms and the reputation of the all cops who try to do their best.
     
  4. widgeteer Suspended

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    #4
    There's been a wealth of data over the last few years that systemic racism is indeed a problem.
     
  5. Vanilla Ice macrumors 6502

    Vanilla Ice

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    #5
    Which race are you referring to?
     
  6. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #6
    There’s a lot of social class based discrimination too (both ways). That is also bad.
     
  7. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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  8. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #8
    In my mind "systemic racism" would mean that the implementation of law/policing would be racist. I'm not denying that there's racial, age, or social class bias (aka 'profiling') done by cops, and that it goes to far in that those biases alter the particular cop's perspective on the situation. But systemic means "relating to a system, especially as opposed to a particular part". Is it the systems fault or is it the individual cop?
     
  9. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #9
    Both ways. But yes.
     
  10. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #10
    It's not like we weren't all teenagers at one point in time. I was harassed quite a bit.
     
  11. widgeteer Suspended

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    #11
    System's. It's of course a larger societal issue. The article below is a good primer on the subject, with a wealth of more data out there:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...1a3564181a1_story.html?utm_term=.3e675ae7d5af
     
  12. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #12
    Here's yet another one that just now came across my feed. It's from Radley Balko, a WP writer who has spent most of his career reporting on the issue of police and prosecutor malfeasance. Here's a case where police went to the wrong place, killed and innocent man and will now face absolutely no punishment for the crime of killing an innocent. This happens all too often in these cases.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...ct-them/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.d0bb251af102
    --- Post Merged, Jul 27, 2018 ---
    While there is undoubtedly racism at play in many cases of police abuses, I do not think it is the overriding cause of most of our problems with them. It is their immunity from real punishment, when they commit violations that allows bad behaviour to continue. That and the governments war on drugs have made for a deadly combination where our safety and rights are concerned.
     
  13. widgeteer Suspended

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    #13
    I think it's all tied together, quite frankly.
     
  14. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #14
    Well I'm not sure if it's a difference of opinion on scope, or approach (top-down vs bottoms-up). At the highest levels we have the principles of the US constitution, or up here the Charter of Human rights. Both of these documents outlines the principles for our governments and both hold freedom of persecution on the basis of race (among others). So at that gold standard, we go lower down. Our federal governments, our state/provincial governments, and our municipal governments and their law enforcement agencies at all levels. Now your link is an example of the systemic racism at Baltimore PD, what may be a simple oversight has the grand appearance of selecting out black males, and perhaps any delay in correcting the issue is even more telling. However this doesn't mean that the entire system encourages such practices, but when you see such practices and outrageous and tragic mistakes go unpunished then it is by all means yet another issue to address.
     
  15. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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  16. H2SO4 macrumors 601

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    #16
    That makes them bad cops also.
     
  17. GermanSuplex macrumors 6502a

    GermanSuplex

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    #17
    You said it. It's sad when you watch a movie like Serpico and think "OK, so other than cinematography and Al Pacino being older... what's changed?"
     
  18. H2SO4 macrumors 601

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    #18
    Have to check that out. Not seen it.
     
  19. GermanSuplex macrumors 6502a

    GermanSuplex

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    #19
  20. Khalanad75 macrumors 6502

    Khalanad75

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    #20

    This is crap that it happened and I feel bad for this girl, but blanket statements like this one is just yet another divisor to our communities and nation. "Guess there are two laws in this country. One for us and one for them."
     
  21. JayMysterio, Aug 24, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018

    JayMysterio macrumors 6502a

    JayMysterio

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    #21
    That line is an honest sentiment for some, dependent on which side of that situation you were on.

    It may seem like crap & divisive to you, if your support for the authorities is unwavering and has never had a need to waver. On the other hand there's a fair number of already documented cases that lead one to think otherwise, ...and even take a knee.

    One side doesn't dismiss the other. It may just mean your life experiences are wildly different.
     
  22. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #22
    Yep, that's something I and many others have been saying for years.
    --- Post Merged, Aug 24, 2018 ---
    There is plenty of evidence to support my statement. When police are actually caught and prosecuted for criminal acts their punishments are often much more lenient than those that would be handed out to non-police citizens. Many times the police are not even arrested or prosecuted for crimes, where we would be. The assertion that there are two levels of law in this country would tend to be borne out by the evidence.
    --- Post Merged, Aug 24, 2018 ---
    How about killing a promising young woman through negligence and then covering it up? This is actually quite common in many instances. Lie about the killing, disparage and demean the victim and have the whole department behind you.

    https://newsmaven.io/pinacnews/publ...-blame-teen-for-crash-ZsTecEivZUSqfIWMbHh3Hg/
     
  23. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #23
    Here's a new case where a cop strangled his own son in a public setting over a discussion about cannabis. If you cannot control yourself in a discussion then you have no business being in a job where you carry a gun and interact with the public. It's bad enough that people in the police profession have a much higher rate of domestic violence than the rest of us. This officer is currently on paid vacation from his department (administrative leave).

    https://kfor.com/2018/08/27/tecumse...son-following-argument-at-shawnee-restaurant/

     
  24. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

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    #24
    Unfortunately, when you give people positions of authority over others, there will always be a small percentage who take advantage of it. There will also likely be those in power aware of the corruption but are either too afraid to confront it or believe protecting their institution from bad press outweighs the incidents of corruption.

    I’m not entirely sure how you can root out all the bad apples in law enforcement. I think independent oversight is vital and holding law enforcement officers to a very high standard (zero tolerance, severe consequences) should help deter corruption.

    Part of the problem is people who seek to exploit power often seek out positions that easily give them power, such as becoming a police officer. In other words, there are some people who become police officers for all the wrong reasons.

    That said, in my very limited experience, the vast majority cops are good people with the best intentions at heart. There’s bad actors everywhere, unfortunately in law enforcement the consequences just tend to be devistating for the victims.
     
  25. DearthnVader macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #25
    I don't think thing are as bad as they were in the past, there has always been corruption and racism in the police force.

    It just gets reported more now, and that is a good thing, as there are no necessary evils in government, it's evils exist only in it's abuses.

    We should stamp out corruption and racism within government, anywhere we find it.
     

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46 July 27, 2018