The Trump Brand is Sinking

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Original poster
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,409
Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.


It’s now pretty clear that Donald Trump has been using his presidential campaign to promote his various business ventures. Remember when he touted his Turnberry, Scotland, golf course as a beneficiary of Great Britain’s exit from the European Union this summer? But if Trump hoped his campaign would elevate the value of his brand, it looks like just the opposite is happening.

Trump’s biggest disaster of the campaign — the revelations of a lewd tape in which he boasted about sexually accosting women — has led critics to throw more shade on his businesses. Fellow celebrity-billionaire Mark Cuban tweeted this on Friday night:


Follow
Mark Cuban

✔@mcuban

Every single @realDonaldTrump hotel and golf course is toast. Done. Over. Bernie Madoff now has a better brand.


He might not be wrong. Take Trump’s latest, most lavish venture: the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., which has become a focal point for grievances against the unconventional Republican presidential candidate.

The 263-room five-star hotel in the historic Old Post Office building opened last month. But even with a prime location near the White House, swanky interiors, and aggressive promotion by the candidate himself, empty rooms have forced the hotel to reduce rates during a peak season. At the same time, the hotel has lost two planned restaurants, Hispanic employees are making claims of discrimination, and protesters are gearing up to do whatever they can to cause trouble for the hotel.

Some of the issues even predate Trump’s presidential campaign: When the government inked a 60-year, $200 million lease with Trump in 2012, rival hoteliers took the unusual step of warning Uncle Sam that the deal could turn into yet another Trump business failure.

Those warnings look increasingly prophetic. While the break-even rate on the hotel rooms is more than $750 a night, by some estimates last weekend rooms could be had for under $500 per night — at a time when rival hotels were sold out weeks ahead of time. In his bid to win the lease, Trump promised to offer luxurious suites to lure business execs and diplomats, but many of the international elite appear to be avoiding it.

Last weekend bankers and dignitaries from around the world descended on Washington for the annual World Bank–IMF meetings. But just a few days before, the conference rooms were not only still available at Trump International, they were heavily discounted. On October 2, a deluxe room, with a rack rate of $805, could be had for as low $445 a night onHotels.com. All other five-star D.C. downtown hotels were sold out. By Wednesday, October 5, weekend stays in the deluxe rooms were marked down to $404 per night on Trump International’s own website. The more luxurious 500-square-foot executive rooms, with a city view and marble bath, were only $484. By comparison, at the Waldorf-Astoria in Georgetown, the only available rooms were $1,139 per night, according to Hotels.com.
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/10/trumps-d-c-hotel-shows-as-poll-sink-so-does-his-brand.html
 
Last edited:

thermodynamic

Suspended
May 3, 2009
1,336
1,175
USA
Sorry, but who pays $450-$1100+ per night for a room at a hotel? Even for Washington... :eek:
Washington, land of $5000 hookers?

If they're bringing in receipts for the hotel rooms and the room is only $1k...
[doublepost=1476379672][/doublepost]
It's that efficient private sector again. When I travel as an employee at a UK university, £100 ($121 ... but falling every.single.day.) is considered the norm for room and board.
Ironic. Private sector hotels will charge what the market will bear. Location location location, and customer base customer base customer base, efficiency is not the word. Greed might be, though.

Unless you're referring to socialism, since the UK is far, far closer to that than the US is...
 

webbuzz

macrumors 68000
Jul 24, 2010
1,522
5,642
Sorry, but who pays $450-$1100+ per night for a room at a hotel? Even for Washington... :eek:
Vegas during CES and other large trade shows is very common. $300 to $500 is pretty common for ordinary business travel.
 

Limey77

macrumors regular
Apr 22, 2010
103
974
Sorry, but who pays $450-$1100+ per night for a room at a hotel? Even for Washington... :eek:
One of my clients took the most exclusive "village" comprising of three villas at Hotel Le Sereno on St Barts over New Years for $65,000 a night with a minimum stay of five nights, then only stayed for three!
 

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Original poster
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,409
Two of my friends and I took a half-floor suite at the Beverly Hills Plaza for 4 nights after a very successful stay in Vegas. $2,150 a night in 1992.
 

Populism

macrumors regular
Jun 11, 2014
185
2,970
That's the funny thing about Trump - I have no doubt when this started he thought to himself that he had nothing to lose and everything to gain. In a worst case scenario, he'd find himself president. In a best case scenario, he'd lose but have a good showing, garner more fame, and add to his brand. And that's the funny part - he has destroyed his brand, and his brand is so visible that the impact will be immediate. By contrast, pretend for a moment that everyone suddenly despised Warren Buffett. People wouldn't know how to hit him where it hurts, because his name isn't on all of his assets. Trump on the other hand, puts his damn name on everything, so everyone always knows what is his, and will no doubt be avoiding.

He should have bowed out back in June, and enjoyed an even better quality of life and fame and money. Now his only hope is to actually win this thing.

He's toast, indeed.
 

VulchR

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2009
2,329
10,254
Scotland
Ironic. Private sector hotels will charge what the market will bear. Location location location, and customer base customer base customer base, efficiency is not the word. Greed might be, though.

Unless you're referring to socialism, since the UK is far, far closer to that than the US is...
Vegas during CES and other large trade shows is very common. $300 to $500 is pretty common for ordinary business travel.
One of my clients took the most exclusive "village" comprising of three villas at Hotel Le Sereno on St Barts over New Years for $65,000 a night with a minimum stay of five nights, then only stayed for three!
Let me guess - these absolutely essential :rolleyes: hotel charges are deducted as a business expense in corporate tax returns, so the rest of us smuck taxpayers wind up paying for it in the end.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LizKat

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Original poster
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,409
Let me guess - these absolutely essential :rolleyes: hotel charges are deducted as a business expense in corporate tax returns, so the rest of us smuck taxpayers wind up paying for it in the end.
That's a fact. My old company was bought by a private equity firm. I traveled to Denver one week a month. The new CEO told me I could and should be spending more on the road. What's a good soldier to do? I stayed in better hotels, I rented better cars and took the staff out more.
 

LizKat

macrumors 603
Aug 5, 2004
5,345
29,978
Catskill Mountains
One of my clients took the most exclusive "village" comprising of three villas at Hotel Le Sereno on St Barts over New Years for $65,000 a night with a minimum stay of five nights, then only stayed for three!
Nice. The median annual income for 2015 in the US was approximately $55,000.

I feel just a tad out of touch with the everyday problems of your clients :D

On thread: Trump's kids must be wondering how to wind this thing up. A season of sorta-reality TV for Dad is one thing but the whole business empire getting the gong is something else.
 

bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
4,006
11,823
I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that while his properties are going to look more destroyed than the buildings that used to house SCO after their many frivolous lawsuits regarding patents and IP in Linux, I'm going to hope that Trump's latest hotel venture in D.C. stays afloat for the time being...

... the time being, meaning until that tax loophole that Trump used to not pay taxes for 20 years gets closed, then Trump is stuck with the loss and having to pay for it.

BL.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Scepticalscribe

Gutwrench

Contributor
Jan 2, 2011
3,924
9,054
Snap..crackle...pop. It's been an extremely entertaining election run. But all good things eventually come to an end. I'm looking forward to D1 wrestling season & the NFL.
 

Zombie Acorn

macrumors 65816
Feb 2, 2009
1,301
9,062
Toronto, Ontario
Trump already mentioned he was sacrificing his businesses to run as president, with as fractured as the country is it would be almost impossible not to piss off at least 50%.
 

Thomas Veil

macrumors 68020
Feb 14, 2004
2,435
5,528
OBJECTIVE reality
Hey....I just think you may have stumbled onto the demographic that Trump needs to be going for. Basically Trump needs to embrace his pervyness and start marketing his properties accordingly. :D
I don't know if even whores would stay at his hotels. Unless they're from Congress, of course.

Personally, I think he could still make money by turning all of his properties into, um, rehabilitation facilities for his voters.
 
Last edited:

Zenithal

macrumors G3
Sep 10, 2009
9,032
10,115
It wasn't much of a brand to begin with. I remember first seeing the Trump brand of products in stores and found them to be cheap. Of course, even then they were made by workers, likely a child, in a third-world country. I believe it was in a Nordstrom's. Which arguably carried better products many years ago opposed to now, but the point still stands.

Despite their being some old money in Trump, the man is the epitome of nouveau riche cheesiness. Which extend from his manners to his property. In most cases, his high end hotels remind me of the garishness you see with the newly minted rich Middle Easterners in the UAE who have little taste in their home furnishings and are materialistic fashionistas. If I wanted to stay at a bordello, I'd find a bordello.

Vegas during CES and other large trade shows is very common. $300 to $500 is pretty common for ordinary business travel.
It isn't just for CES. I was there many years ago for a NAB show as a guest of a production company and the rates were high. Even if you were off the strip and got a deal with Expedia, you'll be hard pressed to find anything less than $230 a night that wasn't a dump.
 
  • Like
Reactions: webbuzz

webbuzz

macrumors 68000
Jul 24, 2010
1,522
5,642
It isn't just for CES. I was there many years ago for a NAB show as a guest of a production company and the rates were high. Even if you were off the strip and got a deal with Expedia, you'll be hard pressed to find anything less than $230 a night that wasn't a dump.
Agreed, which is why I said most large shows. There was a period of ~ 15 years that I was in Vegas 4 to 5 times each year for shows. Thankfully towards the end I was able to make it a day trip, two days at the most.

I don't miss that.
 

Zenithal

macrumors G3
Sep 10, 2009
9,032
10,115
Agreed, which is why I said most large shows. There was a period of ~ 15 years that I was in Vegas 4 to 5 times each year for shows. Thankfully towards the end I was able to make it a day trip, two days at the most.

I don't miss that.
Ah yes. I remember when the flights were $150, 200 at most and you could have a lot of fun. Then things got more expensive. I haven't been to Vegas in a decade, I think. From what I've heard, it's gone down hill.