The Truth

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Michaelgtrusa, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. Michaelgtrusa macrumors 604

    Michaelgtrusa

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Location:
    Everywhere And Nowhere
    #1
    A Real Bite Out of Apple:Child Slave Labor






    Child slave labor is mostly considered being used for the production of clothes, toys, and athletic equipment. Apple, one of the largest brands of electronics today, produces the popular iPhone, iPod, and numerous types of computers. In its production however, Apple admits to using child slave labor to support the popular demands of the company’s products.

    In today’s society, most children and adults try to keep up with the ever evolving electronic evolution taking place. Apple began its company on April 1, 1976 with its two co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. They effectively created the Apple Computer that was released on January 3, 1977, in Cupertino, California. For more than two decades, Apple Computer was predominantly a manufacturer of personal computers, including the Apple II, Macintosh, and Power Mac lines. With the introduction of the wildly successful iPod music player in 2001, Apple established itself as a leader in the consumer electronics industry. It went on to release the iPhone and iPad. Today, Apple is the largest technology firm in the world.
    Apple is mainly known for two of its famous products. In October 2001, Apple introduced its first iPod portable digital audio player. The iPod started as a 5 gigabyte player capable of storing around 1000 songs. Since then it has evolved into many products including the Mini (now discontinued), the iPod Touch, the Shuffle, the iPod Classic, the Nano, and the iPod Video. As of March 2010, the largest storage capacity for an iPod was 160 gigabytes. The company grew immensly as the iPods themselves grew. When new iPods came out, comertials with bright colors and music captured eyes of its viewers. The iPod touch began iPods with internet accesss. With this uprising ability in electronics, Apple has no where to go but up.
    The second widely known product by Apple is the iPhone. In the fall of 2006 Steve Jobs had tasked about 200 of Apple's top engineers with creating the iPhone. The phone became a disaster. After a year and a half of secret meetings, Jobs had finally negotiated terms with the wireless division to be the iPhone's carrier. In return for five years, AT&T would receive roughly 10 percent of iPhone sales. He showed off the iPhone's brilliant screen, its powerful Web browser, and its engaging user interface. Sigman, a taciturn Texan steeped in the conservative engineering traditions that permeate America's big phone companies, called the iPhone "the best device I have ever seen." Six months later, on June 29, 2007, the iPhone went on sale. At press time, analysts were speculating that customers would purchase up to about 3 million units by the end of 2007, making it the fastest-selling smartphone of all time.
    With the heavy demand of products Apple faced, Apple opened many more factories. They are located in Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, the U.S., the Czech Republic, Malaysia and the Philippines, but most of its products are assembled in China. It has been admitted by Apple that child slave labor is used mostly in China to keep up with the ever growing demand of Apple products.

    Many problems are facing the sweatshop workers and Apple. Not only is Apple supporting this slave labor, suicide rates and deadly chemicals are hurting those working in the factories as well. An audit for the company found that at least eleven 15-year-old children were found to be working in three factories that supply Apple in the last year.It was said: “When Apple investigated further, we uncovered additional records and conducted worker interviews that revealed excessive working hours and seven days of continuous work.” The audit then began to report that at least 55 of factories which produced Apple products were ignoring rules that staff must not work more than 60 hours a week.
    The audit also found one facility had attempted to conceal evidence of employing underage labor, while two others had falsified records relating to the number of working hours and days of rest employees were receiving. One of these plants had falsified records for two years in a row in order to conceal that it was using child labor and overworking staff. Based on the repeat core violation and inadequate actions, Apple is terminating all business with this facility.
    Apple has been repeatedly criticised for using factories which abuse workers and impose harsh conditions on workers. 62 workers at a factory which makes parts for Apple and Nokia were hospitalised after being poisoned by n-hexane, a toxic chemical commonly used in technology. This can cause muscular degeneration and blurred eyesight. Apple has not commented on the problems at the plant, which is in Suzhou, China. A spokesman for Wintek, which runs the factory, said that almost all of affected staff were back at work.
    Reports have now been emerging about a high number of worker suicides at the Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China. The first suicide was during the summer when Sun Danyong, a 25 year old worker, lost a prototype of the fourth-generation iPhone, jumped to his death. Now, a shocking 12 Foxconn workers have now ended their lives this year, mostly by jumping from the massive multi-story dormitories they live in. All those who have committed suicide have been between the ages of 18 and 24. They only know their role as producing the high quality products Apple produces.
    Apple began as a high grossing company in the electronic fields. Little did the co-owners of the company expect the demand that was on their products. Once reaching a high demand for popular iPhones and iPods, the company turned to child slave labor to support the company. The Apple company claims to be shutting down many of the places that are using such labor, but the real testimony of Apple relies on the other thousands of factories that commit this crime daily.


    Article link. http://ihscslnews.org/view_article.php?id=313
     
  2. MacHamster68, Feb 13, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2011

    MacHamster68 macrumors 68040

    MacHamster68

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    #2
    shocking? i guess not , its common practice to move production to china and other asian countries because of cheapest labour and because of lax environment laws and a disregard for health and safety of the workforce , but without china and the rest of the asian countries none of the big computer companies would be where they are now
    and you could not buy a iphone , ipod,ipad,iMac, mini..or pc or other phone or anything really for the price these products are sold for , if its components would have to be produced under western environment laws and health and safety standards even a ipod would become unaffordable for most of us
    and its not the computer industry alone its widespread through all industry sectors including chemical industry
    and who cares really about some hundred workers all around china who get sick or jump of buildings , there are millions there to replace them , and as long as we in the western world tighten up our laws concerning environment and health and safety of the work force more and more companies will outsource parts of the production to countries where they can cheaply make them without some government body who tells you off , all these companies want to make high profits , they are after all companies not charities

    like i said it concerns all sectors not only the computer industry , even medical industry ,and beauty industry as animal testing is illegal in most western countries to some extend (there are exceptions and figures how many and how often )they go to asia even that some countries there have laws , but where you just give some inspector a couple quid and the problem is solved, it even affects the food industry . most of the chickens for example that are eaten today in the uk come from thailand , because there they can bread them in conditions no western country would allow

    the truth is without asia we could simply not afford the living standard in western europe and north america we have today, and its not in the consumers interest to change that
     
  3. Burnsey macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    ^^

    I'm sure Apple could afford cutting their cash stockpile in half so that we can buy their products for the same prices but without them having to go to such lengths to cut costs.
     
  4. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Location:
    Hogtown
    #4
    it is not just Apple ... there are many greedy companies doing the same ... a very common practice
     
  5. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    Away from you
    #5
    many greedy consumers = many greedy companies.
     
  6. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Location:
    Hogtown
    #6
    The difference is ... most greedy companies could afford to produce products without the cheap foreign labour.

    where as all the greedy consumers you mention ... some just could not afford things if they were not produced with cheap labor.
     
  7. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    Away from you
    #7
    Afford to? How do you successfully market something that costs twice as much as the competition's model, when the consumers don't care where or how it's made?

    I don't buy that at all. It's all a matter of priorities. Besides, if our standard of living is artificially inflated, it is what it is. We need a chicken in every pot, but not a flat-screen in every house.
     
  8. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Location:
    Hogtown
    #8
    successful marketing and production of goods? ... I am referring to banning all child labor and making everyone produce products on the same playing field

    as for consumers affording things ... I am just not referring to Color TVs ... many things are produced with child labor ... like basic clothing?
     
  9. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    Away from you
    #9
    I'm all for banning child labor. I'm telling you that American consumers would be shocked to see what that does to their prices. The "greedy companies" are not going to just absorb the cost increase. It would be as popular as taxing gas to $6 a gallon.

    As for consumers affording things... I hear a lot of complaints from people in my area about how "expensive" things are and how they couldn't survive if prices keep going up. By and large, these people lease luxury SUVs and live in homes worth 4x the American median. A lot of us in this country see a "hardship" as having to choose between an XBox and a PS3 because we can't "afford" to have both.

    Admittedly, I don't run in circles where people literally can't afford to put clothes on their backs, but I have a hard time believing that bringing labor costs into legitimacy is going to do them any favors.
     
  10. StruckANerve macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Location:
    Rio Rancho, NM
    #10
    Apples sales numbers show that no one gives a damn how the product is manufactured.
     
  11. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #11
    Apple still charges a premium for their products and that is with cheap labor.
     
  12. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    Away from you
    #12
    We simply allow them to do that. Supply and demand. You, me, and everybody else vote with their wallets.

    And If the other companies out there all raised their prices on account of fair labor practices, Apple would probably do the same, because they could still charge a premium over the average cost. I don't think that makes them greedy any more than, say, Lexus is for selling tarted-up Toyotas.

    If we really cared, we would seek out companies (if there even are any in the consumer electronics industry) that used fair labor practices and shun the rest. From what I can tell, this only happens on a very small scale, and more along the lines of Famer's Markets and organic foods. Who's going to be the first to give up all their Apple stuff? ;)
     
  13. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    #13
    You are only looking at half the product. The other half (the system software) is, unless I have been mislead, made with fairly expensive domestic labor (nerds at 1 Infinite Loop). Effectively, the "premium" is like a royalty fee for the Apple system design.
     

Share This Page