Other These ratings are NOTHING compared to having CT scans


AustinIllini

macrumors demi-goddess
Oct 20, 2011
11,250
7,953
Austin, TX
Couple of things
  1. iPhone and its competitors all fall within the safe limit
  2. Many physicians are cognizant of the CT scan issue.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,125
82
You know I only posted it because I thought it was interesting, I've had many CT scans or X-rays to count.
 

djdsas

macrumors member
Jul 20, 2008
93
15
You're comparing apple's to oranges.

Cell phones use non ionizing radiation(RF or 'radio waves') while CT uses ionizing radiation(X-ray radiation)


https://www.defendershield.com/faqs/what-is-the-difference-between-non-ionizing-electromagnetic-fields-and-ionizing-radiation

A better comparison would be an MRI, which uses magnetic fields and RF radiation vs cell phones.

Both measure the amount of RF radiation is deposited into the patient (MRI) or user (cell phone) called
SAR(specific absorption rate).
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,125
82
I've been lucky to not have had an MRI... yet.
 

davedvdy

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2011
572
306
I've been lucky to not have had an MRI... yet.

MRI uses non ionizing radiation and is the safest imaging modality, CT the WORST by far,
it's well documented. CT is still needed to show bone or blood in certain situations.

The MRI Machine will not start a sequence if the SAR limit is ever exceeded. It's very safe
as long as there aren't any contraindications carelessly missed by a doctor or the MRI Technologist (pacemaker, metal objects, etc.).
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,125
82
MRI uses non ionizing radiation and is the safest imaging modality, CT the WORST by far,
it's well documented. CT is still needed to show bone or blood in certain situations.

The MRI Machine will not start a sequence if the SAR limit is ever exceeded. It's very safe
as long as there aren't any contraindications carelessly missed by a doctor or the MRI Technologist (pacemaker, metal objects, etc.).
I actually meant that when I have a CT scan and and the initial scan is so inconclusive, they decide to go for an MRI.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
MRI uses non ionizing radiation and is the safest imaging modality, CT the WORST by far,
it's well documented. CT is still needed to show bone or blood in certain situations.

The MRI Machine will not start a sequence if the SAR limit is ever exceeded. It's very safe
as long as there aren't any contraindications carelessly missed by a doctor or the MRI Technologist (pacemaker, metal objects, etc.).
Because I have titanium screws in my mastoid bones (anchors for bone-anchored hearing aids) I always need to alert medical staff when I am going to be having an MRI or a CT Scan. Happily that doesn't come up too often! Last MRI I had was quite a few years ago when I was being evaluated for lumbar disc herniation.
 

davedvdy

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2011
572
306
Because I have titanium screws in my mastoid bones (anchors for bone-anchored hearing aids) I always need to alert medical staff when I am going to be having an MRI or a CT Scan. Happily that doesn't come up too often! Last MRI I had was quite a few years ago when I was being evaluated for lumbar disc herniation.
Titanium screws are usually okay as long as there isn't loose metal in the body typically. I'm not sure about CT since I was never trained in that modality. The issue I had was when a Doctor gave me a patient with a pacemaker. If I put him into the scanner, he would've passed away.

The MRI scanner's magnet is more than 140,000 times stronger than the pull of the Earth's own magnetic field.
Medical professionals just need to be very careful. People have died from careless mistakes intentional or not, sadly.
 

AustinIllini

macrumors demi-goddess
Oct 20, 2011
11,250
7,953
Austin, TX
The MRI scanner's magnet is more than 140,000 times stronger than the pull of the Earth's own magnetic field.
Medical professionals just need to be very careful. People have died from careless mistakes intentional or not, sadly.
The death count is unbelievably low. MRI is not CT and not nearly as dangerous.

Realistically, if you need a CT or an MRI, get one. That's all there is to it.
 

davedvdy

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2011
572
306
The death count is unbelievably low. MRI is not CT and not nearly as dangerous.

Realistically, if you need a CT or an MRI, get one. That's all there is to it.
They die because of prescreening issues, I stated CT is more dangerous (unedited post #6) ^

Realistically, yes...they are used for different reasons.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
I had CTs prior to my surgery for the titanium implants.....haven't had one since, come to think of it. Only MRI was some years later for the definitive diagnosis of what was already suspected, lumbar disc herniation at L5/S1. As long as I am conscious and able to tell the medical personnel prior to going to any sort of radiological procedure what I have in my skull, not a problem..... I do sometimes worry, though, if I were involved in, say, an auto accident and unconscious and transported to hospital and whisked right into the radiology department.... Hopefully, especially in the case of a suspected head injury, someone might notice the titanium abutments (the other pieces of the fixtures) sticking out of my skull, as probably in the impact of an auto accident the sound processors themselves would be knocked off my head. At the time I first got my bone-anchored hearing aids I was given a card which had information on it to give to medical personnel but I have long since lost that card, unfortunately. I also have other issues which would be important for medical personnel to know in case of an emergency but again, if I'm unconscious, I won't be able to tell them..... Even if I AM conscious and DO tell them they don't always listen, though. Case in point was at the time of the inevitable surgery for that already-mentioned herniated disc. I told them beforehand that I have a narrow airway and would be a difficult intubation and they nodded and smiled and said, "Ok, sure....we'll take care of it!" Heh, they had to learn the hard way that I was NOT exaggerating. Fortunately, everything came out well in the end and I survived, didn't need an emergency trach, but I hope that those folks learned that maybe next time they should take the patient's word for some things right from the start and use a Difficult Intubation kit right from the get-go......