This is why I don't eat processed meat

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by niuniu, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #1
    Spotted this while looking up another article. Look at it

    [​IMG]
    That's ammonia treated connective tissue and other gunk. For your kids.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/05/pink-slime-for-school-lun_n_1322325.html?ref=mostpopular

    Pretty sure this isn't legal in the UK, but even still, the processed meat we have here is known to contain all sort of stuff you wouldn't eat if you saw it whole. Very rare I'll eat meat these days, bit if I do it's got to be top notch.

    Give your kid a packed lunch if they serve that pink goop above. Cancer rates are so high - I wouldn't be surprised if one day they find 'food' like that is contributory.
     
  2. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #2
    I'm not saying it should be served to school children, but the problem is that if we're not going to eat it, who is? One could just dump it, but if we're all just going to eat the prime cuts, there will be a lot of waste.
     
  3. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #3

    Ideally, you grandfather in existing batches of pink slime and not produce any more.

    But if that's your idea of good eats, who am I to say?

    I haven't touched the stuff in over 20 years.
     
  4. steve knight macrumors 68020

    steve knight

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  5. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #5
    You've never heard of dogfood?


    I agree niuniu and I even try to stay away from stew meat. Whole cuts of grass fed beef and organically grown chicken without antibiotics are the the only types of meat I eat. Everything else is suspect.
     
  6. (marc), Mar 6, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012

    (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #6
    There's no way around scraps, trimmings, etc. if you process an animal.

    I don't even want to know what they put in dog food - I surmise it's even worse than that pink slime.
     
  7. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #7

    You're concerned about not wasting this valuable product.

    Well, you can feed any existing batches to the people who've been enjoying it all these years and not produce any further batches ... if the product is really so unappealing.

    Personally, it doesn't seem any less appealing than the many meat products people consume every day.

    Eat your pink slime or there's no desert for you!
     
  8. ericrwalker macrumors 68030

    ericrwalker

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    #8
    I suddenly feel the urge to buy some potted meat on my way home today. It's probably better than that crap.
     
  9. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #9
    It really says something when even Mcd's and Taco Bell won't touch the stuff.
     
  10. LostSoul80 macrumors 68020

    LostSoul80

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    #10
    That just looks yummy. You'll eventually throw up a bit, but that defenitely looks good.
     
  11. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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  12. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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  13. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    #13
    Connective tissue dyed pink to look like meat isn't my idea of a appetizing meal either. School children should be served standard meat products. I wonder if this is tied in with some type government backed meat packing scam where the workers sweep the floors of discarded meat products at the end of the shift and sell it to the government for the same price as regular meat.

    The food industry in the U.S. is truly, horribly screwed up and what some corporations get away with is criminal.
     
  14. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #14
    Me too. Not sure what the hubbub is about:confused:
     
  15. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #15
    Some people realize what they were eating all along.
     
  16. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

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    #16
    From the link:

    It's interesting to note that there are multiple issue to consider here. One of the objections is that the product is not 'nutritionally equivalent" to ground beef. the other is that the cleaning agents pose a health hazard.

    Without more data we can't draw an infomred conclusion, but if microbiologists are recommending against its use the USDA better have a very stong case addressing their concerns if they are to convince us it's safe.

    It sounds like a failure of a department to keep to its own standards. It's one thing to create a low-grade but still safe product that is more filler and less meat, but if it poses health risks due to chemical agents added during processing it is completely unaccpetable.
     
  17. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #17
    Appropriate topic for a forum that discusses the ugliness that is sausage-making (politics)

    ... The slaughterhouses that the United States have are pretty unique in terms of the speed of production. We have slaughterhouses that will process 300, 400 cattle an hour, which is as much as twice as many as anywhere else in the world. And it's that speed of production that can lead to food-safety problems.

    When workers are working very quickly, they may make mistakes. It's during the evisceration of the animal, or the removal of the hide, that manure can get on the meat. And when manure gets on some meat, and then that meat is ground up with lots of other meat, the whole lot of it can be contaminated. ...

    At a slaughterhouse, you have big animals entering at one end, and small cuts of meat leaving at the other end. In between are hundreds of workers, mainly using handheld knives, processing the meat.

    So during that whole production system, there are many opportunities for the meat to be contaminated. What we're really talking about is fecal contamination of the meat from the stomach contents or the hide of the animal. When workers are working too quickly, they can make mistakes. And if a little bit of meat gets contaminated, when it's ground up, it can contaminate a lot of meat.

    source
     
  18. thewitt macrumors 68020

    thewitt

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    #18
    ...and if you have ever been in a slaughter house, you would know that there are USDA inspectors on site whose job it is to watch for any issues, test the products, and make sure there is no contamination.

    The US has the best food safety record of any developed nation, per capita, in the world.
     
  19. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #19
    Is this true?
     
  20. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #20

    Or in other words ... prove it's true.

    Anybody can make a claim.

    It's another thing to prove it.
     
  21. localoid, Mar 30, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012

    localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #21
    Governors defend "pink slime", host plant tour

    From: 'Dude, It's Beef!': Governors Tour Plant, Reject 'Pink Slime' Label

    Governors from three meat-producing states today defended Beef Products Inc. (BPI), the company that makes lean finely textured beef, which now-former USDA scientists nicknamed "pink slime," after a walk through the company's plant accompanied by ABC News.

    "Let's call this product what it is and let 'pink slime' become a term of the past," Texas Gov. Rick Perry said after the tour, after which officials showed off t-shirts with the slogan, "Dude, it's beef!"

    Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, who received $150,000 in campaign contributions in 2010 from the founders of BPI, organized the governors' tour and press conference, but told ABC News that the contribution played no role in his decision to hold the event.

    ABC News was not allowed to ask questions during the tour...

    What's next in the War on Pink Slime? Will an anti-Pink Slime t-shirt bearing the slogan "Pink Slime? Dude, Nooooo Waaay!" make an appearance soon? Developing...
     

    Attached Files:

  22. glocke12 macrumors 6502a

    glocke12

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    #22
    two words....dog food.

    Since I became aware of "pink slime" I have started getting my ground beef at the local butcher shop. It is a world of difference from the stuff you get at the supermarket. It is slightly more expensive, but they will grind it right there in front of you if you want.
     
  23. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #23
    'Dude, It's Beef!': Governors Tour Plant, Reject 'Pink Slime' Label

    Still the World's oldest profession. No contest.
     
  24. mcrain macrumors 68000

    mcrain

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    #24
    Pink slime funds Romney campaign

    If you need a metaphor to describe the frontrunner's campaign, here you go:

     
  25. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #25
    That's what happens when the regulatory agency becomes infiltrated at all levels by people who worked at the very corporations it's supposed to regulate.
     

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