This isn't correct is it? But...

5300cs

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Nov 24, 2002
1,862
0
japan
This is driving me nuts. I think I'm having one of those days. Is this sentence right or wrong?

"When it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake."
 

dotnina

macrumors 6502a
Aug 19, 2004
856
0
Hmm ...

I think it would be better if it read, "If it is sunny tomorrow, we will go to the lake." I *think* this is better. Something makes me think this is one of those we / us things ... you can't say us, you must say we. Then you end up with "we go to the lake," so you need to add something like a "will" or a "shall" in there to make it sound ok.

Now, if the weatherperson said that the sun will be coming out late in the day, it would make sense to say "When it is sunny tomorrow ..." In that case, though, I think you'd need to change the second part of the sentence to say "... we will go to the lake." Somehow, "let's go" doesn't sound correct in that case, though the grammatical reason escapes me.

---
Edit: Darn my slow posting.
Edit2: Added more.
 

PlaceofDis

macrumors Core
Jan 6, 2004
19,232
4
'when it is sunny tomorrow, we will go to the lake' is correct

If it is sunny tomorrow, then we will go to the lake


i believe those two are correct
 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Jan 4, 2002
21,542
7,801
CT
It really should read, "Supposedly it will be sunny tomorrow, so lets go to the lake."
 

saabmp3

macrumors 6502a
Jul 22, 2002
868
0
Tacoma, WA
MacNut said:
It really should read, "Supposedly it will be sunny tomorrow, so lets go to the lake."
I'm an engineer, not english major, but I believe that would be a passive tense, something frowned upon.

BEN
 

5300cs

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Nov 24, 2002
1,862
0
japan
Thanks everyone for all your quick replies.

I told the teachers also that "When it clears up tomorrow, let's go to the lake." would be okay.

This is a junior high school text book put out by the Japanese government, too :rolleyes:
 

PlaceofDis

macrumors Core
Jan 6, 2004
19,232
4
saabmp3 said:
I'm an engineer, not english major, but I believe that would be a passive tense, something frowned upon.

BEN
i am an english major (but im not great with grammar because i do literature studies not grammar, so i can rip books to shreds, and i do my own Creative writing, so i try to break any rules in part, and partly obey them some of the time)

but anyways, passive voice really is not a bad thing. The way it is used in most people's papers causes it to become a problem, there are debates about this that just go on and on, just like grammar, these topics are not my area of specialty but passive is not a bad thing, people just assume that any passive is bad and should not be used, but in some cases, there really is nothing wrong with that tense, it just shouldnt be used throughout a whole paper.....

ok i think im going to go back to writing my poetry now, and reading, make myself sane again
 

Jalexster

macrumors 6502a
Jun 8, 2004
668
0
"i r teh n00b, so let go 2 teh lake tomorrow because it is teh sunny!11!!11!!1"

Um, I mean:

"If it becomes sunny tomorrow, we will go to the lake."
 

BakedBeans

macrumors 68040
May 6, 2004
3,054
0
What's Your Favorite Posish
actually....

you can say that.... english is a funny language because you can say so many things in so many ways, and half the time it can sound wrong but still be right

if it is sunny tomoz, lets got to the lake
but if its cloudy tommoz, lets stay inside and have a few beers

works perfectly
 

camobag

macrumors regular
Nov 4, 2003
106
0
Ok...for all of you that are using the word, "if," in the sentance, stop using it! If you use that word you change the meaning of the sentance. The author originally used the word, "When." It's not a matter of "if" it will be sunny tomorrow, but "when" it is sunny tomorrow. Also, for the sentance, I would just say, "Tomorrow, when it is sunny, let's go to the lake."
 

Cheese

macrumors 6502
When it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake.

Let's go to the lake tomorrow, when it's sunny.
Tomorrow, when it's sunny, let's go to the lake.
When the sun comes out tomorrow, let's go to the lake.

Perhaps the japanese / english translation would be more accurate in meaning if it was to say; "After the sun comes up tomorrow, let's go to the lake -- and drink lot's of Sake and a couple of barrels of Asahi! Bring the iPods and my G5 Powerbook along for the ride."
 

Mr_Ed

macrumors 6502
Mar 10, 2004
443
8
North and east of Mickeyland
In the event that the sun's rays are not interfered upon tomorrow, we should endeavor to travel to the lake.

Just kidding . . . but the original sentence (When it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake.) just sounds really weird to me for the same reason DanTekGeek cited. Can't say that it is "wrong" necessarily, just "strange."

If it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake. would make more sense to me.
 

kylos

macrumors 6502a
Nov 8, 2002
947
0
MI
"when it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake" cannot be transformed to "when it is sunny tomorrow, we will go to the lake" without changing the meaning of the sentence. The former is a suggestion, awaiting ratification by another individual. The latter is a declarative sentence, stating that a trip will be taken to the lake at some time during the day when there is a significant amount of solar radiation reaching the earth.

The real issue with this sentence is that the future tense implied by tomorrow is tied to the dependent clause "When it is sunny" and not the independent clause (the heart of the sentence) "let's go to the lake." This sentence would be best as "Let's go to the lake tomorrow, when it is sunny." It's inverted alternate, "When it is sunny, let's go to the lake tomorrow," however, sounds even worse. A better probable inverted alternative would be "Tomorrow, when it is sunny, let's go to the lake." The issue seems to be that the timeframe is best specified near the beginning, however, the initial attempt to do so resulted in it being attached to the dependent clause, skewing the emphasis.
 

wordmunger

macrumors 603
Sep 3, 2003
5,125
2
North Carolina
It depends on the context. If the context is, it's going to be sunny all day tomorrow, then "when it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake" is not grammatical. However, if the context is, it will be rainy in the morning, sunny midday, and cloudy in the afternoon, then "when it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake" is perfectly grammatical.
 

kylos

macrumors 6502a
Nov 8, 2002
947
0
MI
wordmunger said:
It depends on the context. If the context is, it's going to be sunny all day tomorrow, then "when it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake" is not grammatical. However, if the context is, it will be rainy in the morning, sunny midday, and cloudy in the afternoon, then "when it is sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake" is perfectly grammatical.
For the most part, I agree. However, in a purely logical framework, the original sentence does not directly set the timeframe for the excursion to lake, but only the time frame for the occurence of sun. Constraints on a dependent clause do not also cover the independent clause. However, a constraint on an independent clause, would naturally be implied for the entire sentence. Thus, "Let's go to the lake tomorrow..." would be more accurate. Alternately, if 'tomorrow' is at the beginning of the sentence, it can be assumed it applies to the whole sentence.
 

Squire

macrumors 68000
Jan 8, 2003
1,563
0
Canada
As far as I'm concerned, broken_keyboard hit the nail on the head. That sentence assumes that it will in fact be sunny tomorrow which is odd. The grammatical structure of the sentence is fine, it's just a strange choice of words.

Ex. #1

When I get my new convertible, let's drive to the country.

Seems okay, right?

Ex. #2

When he is older, let's take him to a brothel.

This structure, with it's use of the verb to be, is even closer to the original. However, the assumption here is more accurate: He will get older. So, again, the problem is with the use of when rather than if.

Squire
 

rueyeet

macrumors 65816
Jun 10, 2003
1,070
0
MD
The other thing that makes the original sentence sound odd is that it uses a contraction in one clause, but not the other. It should either be

When it's sunny tomorrow, let's go to the lake. -or- When it is sunny tomorrow, let us go to the lake.

But that's purely stylistic, and not a grammatical necessity.