Tim Kaine Delivers His Entire Political Speech... In Spanish

bradl

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I have to admit, when it comes to knowing your target audience, Kaine has this nailed. This is something that Cruz and Rubio should have done, but didn't. Bush did, but we saw what happened with him.

Now, if Kaine can do this in Arizona or El Paso, that would really make some inroads.

http://www.npr.org/2016/10/17/498259554/watch-vp-candidate-tim-kaine-delivers-full-speech-in-spanish

Watch: VP Candidate Tim Kaine Delivers Full Speech In Spanish
October 17, 201612:41 PM ET
by Scott Horsley

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine spoke to a church group in Miami over the weekend.

That wouldn't be remarkable except that he spoke entirely in Spanish — a first for a candidate on a major-party ticket.

"Yo soy cristiano, un catolico," ("I'm a Christian. A Catholic") Kaine told parishioners at Pneuma Church at the beginning of his five-minute speech.

Kaine described his background working as a missionary in Honduras, where he said he learned lessons about faith, family, and hard work.

He also described his running mate, Hillary Clinton, as a person of strong faith, noting that Clinton was raised in the Methodist church.

Kaine avoided a typical stump speech, saying that would be inappropriate in a church setting. But he urged parishioners to register to vote before tomorrow's deadline.

"Tenemos una responsibilidad a participar y votar en acuerdo con nuestros valores, verdad?" ("We have a responsibility to participate and vote in accordance with our values, right?") he said.

Fifteen percent of Florida's registered voters are Hispanic, tracing their roots to Cuba, Central America, and Puerto Rico, among other places. While Kaine's particular Spanish dialect — Hounduras by way of Virginia — hardly matches the rapid-fire delivery heard on Miami's Calle Ocho, political experts think it can only help in getting his point across.

"The pros certainly outweigh the cons," said Susan McManus, a political scientist at the University of South Florida. "If you try to speak the language, people are appreciative."

She added that a Spanish-speaking politician is hardly a novelty in Florida, where Sen. Marco Rubio and former Gov. Jeb Bush are both fluent.

Still, some Hispanic voters may see it as a sign of pandering, as NPR's Eyder Peralta found shortly after Kaine, and his Spanish, first made their debut on the campaign trail in July. And most Latinos in the country speak English proficiently.

Kaine also showed off his familiarity with scripture, recounting the story of the Good Samaritan and stressing the importance of compassion and help for those less fortunate.

He promised that if he and Clinton are elected, theirs will be an administration in which, "cada dia, estamos trabajando para hacer una differencia en la vida de la gente." (Every day, we're working to make a difference in the lives of the people).

BL.
 

bradl

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I honestly don't like the idea, but good tactical move given his audience.
Why don't you like the idea? Spanish-speaking people are part of the US electorate and have been for 170 years or longer..

BL.
 

bradl

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I am more for the speak English in a public place mentality, but it's their right to do whatever they want, as it's my right to like it or not.
Fair enough. I wasn't asking to criticize, but just curious as to what was your reasoning behind not liking the idea.

BL.
 

cube

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I am more for the speak English in a public place mentality, but it's their right to do whatever they want, as it's my right to like it or not.
If this church normally performs services in Spanish, it is very fitting.
 

MadeTheSwitch

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Apr 20, 2009
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I have to admit, when it comes to knowing your target audience, Kaine has this nailed. This is something that Cruz and Rubio should have done, but didn't. Bush did, but we saw what happened with him.

Now, if Kaine can do this in Arizona or El Paso, that would really make some inroads.

http://www.npr.org/2016/10/17/498259554/watch-vp-candidate-tim-kaine-delivers-full-speech-in-spanish




BL.
He needs to do this in Nevada also. A lot of Hispanics are voting for Johnson in that state for some reason. And there are more Hispanic Trump supporters in Nevada then one would imagine there would be. And she is doing worse with them than Obama did. A little shoring up would be nice...just in case.
 

yaxomoxay

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Fair enough. I wasn't asking to criticize, but just curious as to what was your reasoning behind not liking the idea.

BL.
Mainly for the overused word "inclusivity".
Constitution is in English, laws are made in english, common usage is English. The "glue" language of the US is English.
I am afraid that encouraging other languages will actually divide the population even more. Here in TX there is a large Hispanic community in which I mingle quite often. I can understand almost everything they say, and I can read most of what they write. (I am officially learning Spanish from January 2017). Sometimes I see people that have been here for many years and they can't speak a single word of English. Of course it's their right, but I feel sorry for them. They miss a lot because of this.
 

tshrimp

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Mainly for the overused word "inclusivity".
Constitution is in English, laws are made in english, common usage is English. The "glue" language of the US is English.
I am afraid that encouraging other languages will actually divide the population even more. Here in TX there is a large Hispanic community in which I mingle quite often. I can understand almost everything they say, and I can read most of what they write. (I am officially learning Spanish from January 2017). Sometimes I see people that have been here for many years and they can't speak a single word of English. Of course it's their right, but I feel sorry for them. They miss a lot because of this.
Do you know if speaking English as a qualification necessary for legal citizenship?
 

bradl

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He needs to do this in Nevada also. A lot of Hispanics are voting for Johnson in that state for some reason. And there are more Hispanic Trump supporters in Nevada then one would imagine there would be. And she is doing worse with them than Obama did. A little shoring up would be nice...just in case.
While I agree that he should do this in Nevada as well, we need to take a look at the electorate living there. and as a part-time resident of Las Vegas, we should note that the Hispanic community in Clark County (making up Las Vegas, Paradise (read: The Strip), North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, Searchlight, Mesquite, and smaller towns) makes up 30% of the population. Next would be 16% of the population of Reno and Carson City. Everything else after that is rural, which leans majorly Republican. However, as they are also furious with Trump, that leaves them to lean towards Johnson, or McMullin, as there is a good representation of Mormons in the area as well.

Again, that said, Kaine needs to do this in Nevada, as that can definitely shore up the Hispanic vote there. Perhaps that is to come after the debate on Wednesday.

BL.
 

yaxomoxay

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Do you know if speaking English as a qualification necessary for legal citizenship?
It is, but the test is quite ridiculous, and so is the citizenship test. Five questions that you can answer if you have watched a National Geographic documentary on the US. Way too simple in my opinion (and you know the questions in advance). I had to answer only to three questions
 

cube

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Mainly for the overused word "inclusivity".
Constitution is in English, laws are made in english, common usage is English. The "glue" language of the US is English.
I am afraid that encouraging other languages will actually divide the population even more. Here in TX there is a large Hispanic community in which I mingle quite often. I can understand almost everything they say, and I can read most of what they write. (I am officially learning Spanish from January 2017). Sometimes I see people that have been here for many years and they can't speak a single word of English. Of course it's their right, but I feel sorry for them. They miss a lot because of this.
There is a case to be made that at this point the US should become officially bilingual.
 

bradl

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Mainly for the overused word "inclusivity".
Constitution is in English, laws are made in english, common usage is English. The "glue" language of the US is English.
I am afraid that encouraging other languages will actually divide the population even more. Here in TX there is a large Hispanic community in which I mingle quite often. I can understand almost everything they say, and I can read most of what they write. (I am officially learning Spanish from January 2017). Sometimes I see people that have been here for many years and they can't speak a single word of English. Of course it's their right, but I feel sorry for them. They miss a lot because of this.
Do you know if speaking English as a qualification necessary for legal citizenship?
@tshrimp took the question right out of my post. Straight from the USCIS:

https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/files/article/M-476.pdf

Page 26 has the details.

No absolute requirement necessary for it. If under 50 years of age, you need to have a basic understanding of English, and able to at least speak in phrases. Ages 50 or older are not required to take an English test, and can have the civics test taken in the language of their choice.

BL.
 
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yaxomoxay

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@tshrimp took the question right out of my post. Straight from the USCIS:

https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/files/article/M-476.pdf

Page 26 has the details.

No absolute requirement necessary for it. If under 50 years of age, you need to have a basic understanding of English, and able to at least speak in phrases. Ages 50 or older are not required to take an English test, and can have the civics test taken in the language of their choice.

BL.
Yep it's so incredibly easy that it's just a joke. Of course for Green Card holders there is no language requirement.
 

bradl

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Yep it's so incredibly easy that it's just a joke. Of course for Green Card holders there is no language requirement.
Easy for a a person which English is their native language. For others for whom it isn't, that is a different story. And I'm not just talking the Spanish here. There are a lot of people in my area whose English is very broken and stilted, as their native languages are among Hmong, Tagalog, Russian, Korean, Javanese, Samoan, and others.

Sometimes it takes thinking outside our country to get a perspective on what it takes to live in our country.

BL.
 
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yaxomoxay

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Easy for a a person which English is their native language. For others for whom it isn't, that is a different story. And I'm not just talking the Spanish here. There are a lot of people in my area whose English is very broken and stilted, as their native languages are among Hmong, Tagalog, Russian, Korean, Javanese, Samoan, and others.

Sometimes it takes thinking outside our country to get a perspective on what it takes to live in our country.

BL.
I am ESL. (and my thick accent gives me away lol)
 

s2mikey

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Why don't you like the idea? Spanish-speaking people are part of the US electorate and have been for 170 years or longer..

BL.
Because English is *kind of* the official language of the country. I know, I know.... how dare I say such things. But, immigrants that came here from various parts of Europe learned English without much fuss. Whats the problem with these other people? When you come to a country as an immigrant its usually "right" to learn their culture, langauge and ways of doing things. When in Rome, do as Rome does. Kind of thing.

Ugh.
 
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oneMadRssn

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I am more for the speak English in a public place mentality, but it's their right to do whatever they want, as it's my right to like it or not.
I think we agree on some things! :)

I think knowing a non-English language in the US should be celebrated and encouraged. That said, English should be our primary language and folks that don't know it should be encouraged to learn it. If my Russian-speaking grandparents, who were ~65 when they immigrated here, were able to go to a community college for English classes and learn it well-enough, anyone can. Age and background are no excuse.
 

cube

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Because English is *kind of* the official language of the country. I know, I know.... how dare I say such things. But, immigrants that came here from various parts of Europe learned English without much fuss. Whats the problem with these other people? When you come to a country as an immigrant its usually "right" to learn their culture, langauge and ways of doing things. When in Rome, do as Rome does. Kind of thing.

Ugh.
There's nothing wrong with this people. The candidate CHOSE to address them in their native language.
 
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yaxomoxay

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I think we agree on some things! :)
Oh wow, this is the last sign of Armageddon!!! ;)

I think knowing a non-English language in the US should be celebrated and encouraged. That said, English should be our primary language and folks that don't know it should be encouraged to learn it. If my Russian-speaking grandparents, who were ~65 when they immigrated here, were able to go to a community college for English classes and learn it well-enough, anyone can. Age and background are no excuse.
Exactly. I am against an official language, but not learning English causes big problems in the long run, especially if we talk about large communities.
 

APlotdevice

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Because English is *kind of* the official language of the country. I know, I know.... how dare I say such things. But, immigrants that came here from various parts of Europe learned English without much fuss. Whats the problem with these other people? When you come to a country as an immigrant its usually "right" to learn their culture, langauge and ways of doing things. When in Rome, do as Rome does. Kind of thing.

Ugh.
Uh actually since pretty much the start of this country there has a been a pattern where people tend to move into immigrant communities, where they all share the same culture and speak the same language. It's the successive generations who are more likely to integrate with America.

How difficult it is to acquire a language depends largely on how similar it is to your existing one. The closer two languages are, the easier it is for a speaker of one to learn the other. English is a Germanic language with a ton of French-derived vocabulary incidentally. Conversely the farther appart two languages, the harder it is. Asians and Pacific Islanders have the hardest time learning English due to the fact that they are completely unrelated languages.

And finally, even learning a language doesn't mean you can speak and comprehend it like a native speaker. People are often more comfortable speaking their native tongue because they understand it better.
 
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bradl

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Because English is *kind of* the official language of the country. I know, I know.... how dare I say such things. But, immigrants that came here from various parts of Europe learned English without much fuss. Whats the problem with these other people? When you come to a country as an immigrant its usually "right" to learn their culture, langauge and ways of doing things. When in Rome, do as Rome does. Kind of thing.

Ugh.
And I can counter with that by saying that with people wanting to become active in our culture, and according to the rules they have for naturalization, are you seriously expecting someone who is 60 or older to learn an entirely foreign language to them prior to entering this country, let alone participating in our democratic process? If they have legally entered this country, established residency, and have conformed to all applicable laws, they should not have to learn an entire language before obtaining citizenship. and if they feel comfortable with someone speaking to them in a language they can understand, then all the better, because they are also part of our electorate.

To complete your quote, it is "when in Rome, do as the Romans do", not "when in Rome, do ONLY as the Romans do."

BL.
 

cube

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If India can manage with 22 official languages and the EU with 24, I'm sure the US can handle a few.