Time Capsule mounts as wireless device — even when wireless is turned off!

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by japanime, Jul 26, 2014.

  1. japanime macrumors 68000

    japanime

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Location:
    Japan
    #1
    I've got a previous-generation Time Capsule (the version released just prior to the current model) that won't mount as a wired "Device" when connected to my Macbook Air via Ethernet.

    I have the TC set so the Wireless Network Mode is "Off" and the Router Mode is "Off (Bridge Mode)." There is also no cable going into the TC's WAN port. Just the ethernet cable from one of the LAN ports to my MacBook Air (which has the ethernet-to-USB adapter).

    Nevertheless, the TC only shows up in the Finder as a Shared wireless device. It seems like it's ignoring the WiFi "Off" settings and still connecting to my Mac wirelessly.

    I want to connect via Ethernet to my Mac, not wirelessly. Anybody know what must I do to get this to work?
     
  2. priitv8 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2011
    Location:
    Estonia
    #2
    How can you tell it from Finder?
     
  3. japanime thread starter macrumors 68000

    japanime

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Location:
    Japan
    #3
    The Finder shows is under "Shared" devices, and the disk icon on the desktop says it is connected via AFP.
     
  4. ColdCase, Jul 26, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014

    ColdCase macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    NH
    #4
    That doesn't mean its wireless, as you get the same thing wired. Turn off your MBA's wireless and see if the TC still shows up.

    Can you see any files on the Time Capsule. I always thought you had to have a router function in the loop to assign IP addresses, but I guess the defaults are within the same subnet....
     
  5. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #5
    As long as there is a connection, either via Ethernet or WiFi, the Time Capsule will always show up the same way in Finder as well as connect in the same protocol.
     
  6. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #6
    AFP is an appropriate protocol for both wireless and wired transfer.
     
  7. marzer macrumors 65816

    marzer

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #7
    It's working exactly as it should. A TC (or any network storage device) connected by Ethernet cable will still show up in Finder as a Shared device using AFP (or SMB). The only way to get it to connect as a non-shared device would be to remove the internal hard drive and connect directly to the computer using a peripheral interface such as USB, SATA, TB, etc.
     
  8. Boyd01 macrumors 68040

    Boyd01

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    New Jersey Pine Barrens
    #8
    AFP just means Apple Filing Protocol. I was using it with an Appleshare server many years before the term "wifi" was even coined. :D
     
  9. japanime thread starter macrumors 68000

    japanime

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Location:
    Japan
    #9
    Thanks, everyone, for your replies.

    I guess the slow data-transfer speeds are due to the fact that I'm going through Apple's USB Ethernet adapter for the MacBook Air. Maybe I should purchase the Thunderbolt Ethernet adapter instead, to see if that improves things.
     
  10. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #10
    The fastest speeds you'll see when using the USB-Ethernet adapter are about 33 megabytes per second. That's less than the average maximum of gigabit Ethernet's 70 megabytes per second.
     
  11. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #11
    As Intell stated, the USB Ethernet adapter is only capable of slower speeds. According to the Apple Specification sheet, the adapter is capable of 100 Mbps. That would convert to 12.5 Megabytes per second. The Thunderbolt adapter is Gigabit and is capable of 125 MBps theoretically. Once overhead and all is added in Intell's number on the Thunderbolt Adapter is indeed correct.

    Let the debate on the speed of the USB adapter begin with Intell!
     

Share This Page