To all those who may have forgot !!

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Delta608, Sep 11, 2008.

  1. Delta608 macrumors regular

    Delta608

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2007
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    #1
    September 11th, 2001

    Instead of arguing amongst each other today, how about every American on this board stop and reflect how lucky we are and say a prayer for those who have died on this day seven years ago.... :(:(:(
     
  2. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #2
    How is it possible to forget? We're reminded of it every time the US government wants to force through a bad decision.

    I'm still of the opinion that had they acted on the intelligence at hand it would have been stopped weeks before. Arrogance is as much to blame for those deaths as the people that flew the planes.
     
  3. costabunny macrumors 68020

    costabunny

    Joined:
    May 15, 2008
    Location:
    Weymouth, UK
    #3
    I don't think anyone will forget. I am not American but I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing and with whom on that dreadful day.

    I say a prayer for all those that lost their lives and those of the many emc workers who sacrificed all.

    My candle will be lit this evening.
     
  4. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #4
    How could anyone forget that day? I remember desperately trying to get through to several friends in Lower Manhattan, not knowing if they were alive or dead. I couldn't get through for over 2 days.

    I also won't forget hearing every cell phone on the train go off at almost the same time. Some people were crying already. When we finally got to my stop, people were running UP the stairs, instead of down and getting on the train leaving the loop. There was news a plane was headed for Chicago as well, and I worked right next to the Sears Tower.

    What made it worse was how Bush has constantly used and dishonored those who died that day to shore up his bad policies. I'll never forgive him for it.
     
  5. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #5
    I wasn't arguing, but it was fairly clear from your post that you were trying to evoke some sort of faux patriotic feel-good BS. It's also clear you had no one there in NYC. Sorry, but what I felt that day is directly tied to how I feel now. And lucky isn't what I'm feeling. Cheated is more like it.
     
  6. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Location:
    Tiger Mountain - WA State
    #6
    One of the most heart-warming stories, I have ever heard, happened right after 9/11.

    In the Kenya region, live the Mesai peoples. They are herders who raise cattle as their most prized possession. One tribesman returned to their village from a trip to Nairobi. There he had learned of the 9/11 tragedy and the thousands who were killed. The village elders me to discuss it, then they set aside 1/3 of their herd, and began the trip to take take them to Nairobi. They were offering 1/3 of their entire wealth to aid the suffering of the American people. The officials at Nairobi treated them with grave respect, understanding the magnitude of their offering. But, he explained that transporting the cattle to America would be very difficult. But, he suggested having the American ambassador meet with them, so they could offer a prayer would be much better. And, that was done. There are many good people in the world that we seldom appreciate.
     
  7. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #7
    Aww! That is really cool. What a nice story.
     
  8. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #8
    A wonderful reason why Kenyans and their offspring should be held in the highest esteem in the USA, and feted with the highest accolades the American people can at that time bestow.
     
  9. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #9
    Trust us when we say we haven't forgotten, and will never forget. I was in shock for the week following 9/11. We watched it on a TV at work when someone came in with reports. I saw the second plane hit on live TV and saw both towers collapse there as well.

    We watched as the world rallied behind our country and offered support. We were all in support of going after Osama Bin Laden in Afghanistan.

    We may not like how this administration then went on using September 11, as an excuse to head to Iraq and managed to squander most of the international support we had, but that does not make us traitors or any less patriotic than those who support what the government has done. Speaking out against the government when we believe they are wrong is the foundation of our government and necessary to keep any sort of the shreds of honesty that still exist in D.C. alive.

    We want to see this country thrive and be prosperous, we want what's best for this country and it's citizens. We may not agree in what we think is the best but our goals are the same, a better life for ourselves and our descendants. We love this country, and we won't forget, no matter how harshly we criticize our leaders.
     
  10. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2006
    Location:
    Alabama
    #10
    Very, very well said, and without hyperbole, rhetorical questions, sarcasm or emotion-laden bantor.
     
  11. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    OBJECTIVE reality
    #11
    I have to say, until 2001, every time I heard a veteran or other older person talk about Pearl Harbor, even though I knew the details of it, I couldn't quite feel the sense of horror and loss that they seemed to feel. At least, I couldn't feel it to the same degree. It was history, ya know?

    That all changed on 9/11. Having experienced the sheer horror of that day, I now know fully how the Pearl Harbor generation must have felt.

    It's seven years later and I find my mind still replaying all those horrible scenes from the live TV coverage. And I just cringe.

    I know that feeling of sorrow will never quite leave me, and I guess I'm fine with that. I think we all need to remember how we felt on that day.

    But how will I explain it some day to my 3 year old granddaughter? She'll be like me...knowing about it from the history books, but not knowing what it was like.

    Hopefully her generation will never find out.
     
  12. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #12
    I never really wanted to post in a thread like this, but with all of the negativity and patriotic bollocks going around, I have to.

    Yes, this day 8 years ago was hell, and it still is for people. Hell, I was going to go out flying and planespotting that day, let alone have a trip to the ATC tower at McCarran Int'l in Las Vegas! Then all of that happened, and going out and flying (besides the fact that the FAA closed all US Airspace for 3 days) just didn't feel right.

    But then I read the story about Michael Hingson and his guide dog, Roselle, whom both were able to take his entire floor down all 78 flights of stairs and out before the second Tower fell, and it made me think about how I took a lot for granted not only who we are as a country, but who I am as a person, and how lucky I am to be who I am.

    Michael lost his sight. Michael should have lost his life, TWICE (he had a ticket in 1979 on American Airlines flight 197, but missed it; AAL197 was the DC-10 that lost its engine and crashed out of O'hare - no-one survived). But he didn't, and on 9/11, he proved (at least to me) how essential trust and teamwork are; something that some people (I'm trying hard not to name names) have seemingly forgotten.

    I continue to learn how essential those are, as I'm engaged to someone who has a guide dog from the same place that Roselle came from, and realize how people who are blind depend and trust in dogs like Roselle with their lives.

    I won't go into any further negatives about today, or the government then and now (and believe me, I and everyone else on the planet surely CAN), but I'll leave it by saying don't take @#$% for granted, and if you want to take anything out of today, take something positive out of it and hold a door open or give someone a compliment when they've been raked through the coals. Passing blame isn't going to help anybody now, and the more we wallow in the crap that happened 7 years ago, the more the bad guys win.

    EDIT: Here is another story on Michael and Roselle.

    BL.
     
  13. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #13
    I must be a horrible person cuz i totally forgot. No joke. my bad.:eek:
     
  14. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #14

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