Tsarnaev death penalty

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by dukebound85, May 17, 2015.

  1. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #1
    I am curious how you feel about this. I am surprised that a VERY liberal state arrived at the death penalty as opposed to life in prison.

    At first take, it seems very hypocritical to the stance I hear many liberals profess they believe. However, does this mean that the death penalty is acceptable depending on the severity of the crime regardless of political affiliation?
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #2
    I am against the death penalty on principle.

    I am for solitary confinment instead.

    The severity of the crime doesn't change that.
     
  3. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #3
    I am against the death penalty, and no the severity of the crime makes no difference.


    Life without parole.
     
  4. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #4
    As a Boston (currently Boston Metro Area, about 150 yards from Boston) resident, I am quite shocked with the death penalty ruling. I feel most people I know are also surprised with the ruling. I would think solitary confinement for the remainder of his life would be a far greater punishment. I'm not a huge fan of the death penalty myself. I don't feel like it is humanities decision to decide who lives and who dies.

    At the time of the bombing, I had an apartment right off Huntington Avenue across from the Prudential Center (moments away from the bombing site). While I wasn't at the finish line, bombing was honestly one of the craziest moments of my life. Huntington Avenue filled up with ambulances, people were running out of the Prudential Center in terror, you could hear the screaming coming from down the street from inside my apartment. Cell phones stopped working. Looking at the bright side, seeing Boston's community and professional (police, fire, EMT, hospital staff, etc) response makes me proud to be a Bostonian. It's unfortunate it had to come at the cost of lives and hundreds of injuries. I now see the marathon as a symbol of Boston's spirit rather than a terrible day in Boston's history.

    Anyways, I'm glad the horse and pony show is over. To be honest, I'm tired hearing about Tsarnaev, Aaron Hernandez, and Tom Brady/Deflate-gate.
     
  5. Thraun macrumors regular

    Thraun

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    #5
    I also oppose the death penalty regardless of how heinous the crime was. Luckily in Canada it's not an option. Though the justice system is still pretty broken, but that's another topic.

    What surprised me is the number of people I've seen on Twitter/FB/etc that are saying how happy they are about the decision, and how glad they'll be to see him die. Even if the death penalty is "justice", it saddens me a little when I hear people getting excited about legally murdering someone.
     
  6. xmichaelp macrumors 68000

    xmichaelp

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    #6
    I am against the death penalty in practice because of increased cost vs life in prison and because I feel like death is less punishment than life in prison.

    I can't say I care that he's going to be killed though, it's pretty obvious he did it and he's scum. If the death penalty could be done quickly at a low cost and no one was ever falsely accused (obviously will never happen) then I wouldn't have much of a problem with it.
     
  7. APlotdevice, May 17, 2015
    Last edited: May 17, 2015

    APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #7
  8. Thraun macrumors regular

    Thraun

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    #8
    What if, instead of a lethal injection or other "humane" method, he had to be throttled to death with someone's bare hands? And what if you were the one that had to do it? Would you be able to kill another defenseless person and watch the life go out of his eyes?
     
  9. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #9
    Injecting someone poison is only humane for the people who are watching.

    A guillotine would be much more humane.
     
  10. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #10
  11. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #11

    12 jurors decided his fate, not the whole of liberal Massachusetts. As for a VERY liberal state, since 1980 they've had 2 Democratic governors and 5 Republicans.
     
  12. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #12
    I'm fundamentally opposed to the death penalty too.

    But in this instance, I think that if a country - or a society - is going to have a Death Penalty, then the Tsarnaev case is probably an example of what such an ultimate penalty is for.

    The was no crime of passion. It wasn't a traffic stop or drug bust gone wrong.

    Terrorism, especially mass casualty terrorism, is probably modern society's ultimate crime. Those guys didn't pack gunpowder into a steel pressure vessel as a prank or to send a message. They did it to kill or maim as many people as possible. They didn't target the politicians who sent US troops into Afghanistan and Iraq, nor did they target military units or weapons makers. They targeted recreational joggers and their families.

    Due to some (IMHO fairly significant) errors during the trial - including the decision to hold the trial in Boston itself, its highly likely the case will be appealed for many years to come.

    One thing I think we can learn from this, however: the civilian justice system is perfectly capable of trying and convicting terror suspects in the United States - and without the trial turning into a circus. Time to end this ridiculous idea that we need Military Tribunals set up in Guantanamo Bay to do the job. Federal Prosecutors and Judges, along with civilian juries have a much better record of getting the job done - and without trashing our nation's reputation in the process.
     
  13. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #13
    I have a problem with the death penalty in this case and any other for several reasons.

    First of all it validates Tsarnaev and other terrorist's ideas that violence can solve issues and that you can make up for a wrong by killing someone.

    Two, it turns him into a martyr, and will inspire other people to make attacks in the future. For people who want to be martyrs and go be with their 72 Virgins having Tsarnaev get the death penalty is an encouragement to commit more crimes as it shows that even if you make it out alive you still have a good chance of the government making you a martyr.

    Three, now rather than this going away with Tsarnaev sitting in prison forgotten for the rest of his life the families of the victims are going to be reminded of what happened over and over as we go through appeals, for several years. Despite me being fairly confident that Tsarnaev wants to die and be a martyr our justice system isn't going to let that happen without a lot of appeals.

    And fourth killing Tsarnaev won't bring back anyone who he killed, nor is it justice, it is just revenge.
     
  14. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #14
    I agree with everything you wrote, except that revenge is one of the reasons for the justice system to exist.
     
  15. td1439 macrumors 6502

    td1439

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    #15
    As others have stated, the fact that Massachusetts is a blue state is irrelevant, since it was a federal trial. I think probably what sealed his fate on this is the reality that he deliberately placed his bomb near children. Martin Richard died as a result, and several other children were badly hurt. We all know how people react when someone targets kids.

    Personally, I'm not totally opposed to the death penalty. I think in some cases, a person demonstrates that he or she is entirely unfit to be a member of human society in any form. Is Tsarnaev such a person? I don't know. He was clearly influenced by his brother and had a difficult childhood. That being said, he made his choices with a clear mind and an understanding of what would happen.

    From an emotional, revenge-driven standpoint, I personally think he would suffer for many years in the supermax facility in Colorado - the same place where they have guys like Terry Nichols locked up. He'd suffer at the hand of his fellow prisoners for killing a child and he would suffer from the hours of solitude.
     
  16. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #16
    And sadly it will probably be a lesson learned for future terrorists, that if they are sure to target children they will be more likely to get the martyrdom that they want if they go to trial.
     
  17. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #17
    Yes please.
     
  18. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    #18
    Wanted death. Found death.

    No irony. Just providence.
     
  19. Gutwrench macrumors 65816

    Gutwrench

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    #19
    Did you forget to use "/s", otherwise of course it isn't.
     
  20. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #20
    The trial wasn't conducted by the State of Massachusetts, but by the Federal Government.

    Exactly.

    Personally, I am also completely opposed to the death penalty.

    ----------

    That is a very good post.

    Your point about Guantanamo Bay is very well made, and ought to be well heeded. And you are quite right to argue that what has been allowed to take place there has tarnished the reputation of the US worldwide, and hugely undermined your moral authority.
     
  21. sodapop1 Suspended

    sodapop1

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    #21
    Regardless of whether or not I agree with the death penalty, in reality the death penalty in the U.S. is often more of an "eventual" death preceded by a lengthy jail sentence. I wonder if jurors would be less inclined to vote in favor of the death penalty if death sentences were effective immediately after the verdict is handed down and the jury witnessed the actual execution as was the case with the hanging of Saddam Hussein. :D
     
  22. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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  23. td1439 macrumors 6502

    td1439

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    #23
    No. Lawyers can reject jurors for a number of reasons. I actually was called to federal jury duty several years ago at the courthouse there this trial took place. I was nearly impaneled, but for some reason one of the sides was excusing anyone who was in the field of education (even though the case had nothing to do with education or teachers). They had already excused 2-3 people who were teachers or college professors, and once I stated I teach at a private school, I was excused as well.
     
  24. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #24
    Almost as hypocritical as conservatives being "pro-life" but also pro-death penalty. :D
     
  25. Huntn Suspended

    Huntn

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    #25
    I'm against the death penalty for two reasons.
    1. We are supposed to be better than killers. When we start picking and choosing which reasons are good enough to kill each other, that's a failure. It must be a consistent standard of unacceptability.
    2. Documentation that a significant number of innocent people are on death row for crimes they were later exonerated for because of DNA evidence.
     

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