Two explosives experts released from Gitmo...

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by thewitt, Apr 4, 2016.

  1. thewitt macrumors 68020

    thewitt

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  2. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #2
    charge them or let them go, enough BS.
     
  3. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #3
    I presume they will be tracked 24-7. But still Guantanamo is expensive too, and unconstitutional.
     
  4. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    #4
    It's been claimed Obama broke his promise by not closing Gitmo, but noting who's in there and why, to just close it down willy nilly would be stupid.
     
  5. steve knight Suspended

    steve knight

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    #5
    he has tried quite a bit to close it. but you can't push stubborn republicans.
     
  6. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    #6
    Maybe that's why ties with Cuba are opening up. Gitmo is in Cuba...

    How is it unconstitutional? "Conservative" Bush helped drag down the 1st and 4th Amendments, more if you include his replacing REX84 with NSPD51 and HSPD20, and even senators like "liberal" Al Franken have voted on issues that only add controversy and remind us about how "gray area" everything actually is: http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/12/3/1042085/-
     
  7. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #7
    In which case they should be charged.
    --- Post Merged, Apr 4, 2016 ---
    Because America is imprisoning people without trial. The Japanese internment in WW2 falls down the same hole too.
     
  8. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    #8
    The GOP does seem stubborn quite often, even when Obama bends over backwards for them (e.g. a certain supreme court nominee for which unions are very thankful right now that the GOP balked despite it all, and Obama's infamous tax cut cave, saying he would not cut medicare in an attack ad against McCain in 2008 but then gutting it to pay for the mess of the ACA, in agreement with the GOP about the TPP (news articles of the time said he was smiling big, giving thumbs up with them in photo ops, etc), and other actions that have all sorts of liberals claiming they were thrown under the bus... a lot of centrists have been experiencing both ups and downs with various decisions, and despite all the catering the right-wing just won't see it. Makes one wonder why the Democrats still give the GOP the time of day... or is it easier to divorce an alcoholic self-destructive spouse?)
    --- Post Merged, Apr 4, 2016 ---
    Well said, much thanks for the clarification and edification!
     
  9. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #10
    he tried really hard, so hard that when he could not do it he decided to sign indefinite detention into law, yeah, that will teach them.:rolleyes:
     
  10. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #11
    The two individuals sent to Senegal (thats not quite the same thing as being "released") - were never captured by US forces. They were captured in Pakistan by Pakistani security forces. They were handed over to the US in 2002; and have been held without trial for fourteen years at Guantanamo Bay.

    Both individuals were assessed by multi-agency tribunals, and were judged as acceptable for release, providing a suitable host country could accept them. They are both in poor health - one is missing a leg, the other several fingers.

    It is also worthwhile noting that the individualized assessment program put in place by the Obama administration has a far lower incidence of recidivism among former detainees than previously.

    The United States cannot keep individuals scooped up in security operations in detention at Guantanamo forever. If we are to maintain our own standards for adherence to the rule of US and international law, people suspected of involvement in criminal terrorist activity either need to be charged; tried; and convicted - or they need to be released.

    There are a number of detainees whom we currently deem as too dangerous to release, and yet whose circumstances of capture or interrogation make impossible to try in open court. These individuals could be kept - just as securely, and at a far lower cost in terms of dollars and international reputation - were they to be transferred to Federal Maximum security facilities inside the United States. We could close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay tomorrow, saving the US taxpayer billions of dollars, and erasing a potent symbol for terrorist recruitment around the world - if it were not for the craven cowardice and stupidity of (mainly) Republican Senators and members of Congress.
     
  11. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #12
    I take it that missing body parts is consistent with being explosives experts? Let me break out my violin in sympathy.

    As far as recidivism goes, I take it the Obama administration hasn't lost whereabouts of the released individuals, the way that the same administration lost track of thousands of high-power weapons they released to lots of bad actors under the Fast and Furious program?
     
  12. XrayTed macrumors regular

    XrayTed

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    #13
    Doesn't appear that blown up infidels is a big concern for Barry Hussein.
     
  13. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #14
    Not really. We have plenty of facilities in the US that could hold the few prisoners remaining there.

    Gitmo is a useless money pit that's extremely inefficient and pisses away millions and millions of dollars a year.
     
  14. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #15

    Here's a mouthful that addresses money. Basically, closing Gitmo ain't gonna save as much as one might imagine. And moving them out of Gitmo could well prove to be a downgrade in accomodations.

    The author JD Gordon makes this point, and other points leading up to it:

    Here’s the plain truth: If and when Gitmo closes, the taxpayer will still be paying the cost of all those military men and women, both within the JTF and OMC. They’ll just be deployed elsewhere overseas, or back to home bases. Well over 2,000 military people will not be fired if Gitmo closes. Nor will hundreds of lawyers, paralegals, contractors and support staff with OMC and other Gitmo-related agencies.

    So let’s ask the simple question: Why is Gitmo so expensive?

    Once anyone actually does the math in looking at specific line items, the sky-high cost myth is shattered in an instant. Here’s the bottom line.

    Even though the Gitmo detainee population has shrunk from 779 to 122 detainees over a decade, the size of the military units and contractors guarding them, providing health care, cooking and cleaning for them, staffing a library and recreational activities haven’t downsized accordingly.

    There are still about 2,000 deployed military men and women serving with Joint Task Force (JTF) Guantanamo, typically rotating on an annual basis. It’s the same as it was when I was a Pentagon spokesman from 2005 to 2009 and visited there more than 30 times with press and human rights groups. During those years, the detainee population declined from quadruple to triple to double the size of today.

    The JTF Medical Group is still composed of about 100 health care professionals. Perversely, while dozens of American veterans have died on secret waiting lists at Veterans Affairs hospitals around the country, practically every detainee has his own doctor or nurse, waiting at his beck and call.

    Next, there’s the virtual army of military lawyers. Assigned to the Office of Military Commissions (OMC) based in the Washington area, these attorneys, paralegals and support staff have made charter flights weekly or more frequently to visit their clients, and to conduct sporadic trials and pretrial motion hearings before a military judge.

    While that made sense during the Bush administration when OMC prosecutors talked openly about 60 or 70 trials, the Obama administration dismissed most of those cases and are only prosecuting Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, four other September 11 co-conspirators and a handful of others.

    Yet like the Joint Task Force staff, the Office of Military Commissions hasn’t shrunk, either.

    Then there are things like the $750,000 detainee soccer field, built from 2011 to 2012. It’s not even nice — just a dirt patch, goal posts and chalk lines — all surrounded by a fence with green mesh around it.

    There’s also the cost of up to four halal meals a day — far more expensive than for our own troops. Imported dates and honey, roasted meats, sides of olives and cheese at every meal, if that’s what the detainees want.

    And then there’s all the treadmills, stationary bikes, Wii-Fits, TVs, Al-Jazeera satellite broadcasts, recreation centers, art classes, and a 10,000-volume library, where J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” series was the most popular for years, only recently eclipsed by “Fresh Prince of Bel Air” videos.



    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news...y-guantanamo-prison-is-so-expensive/?page=all
     
  15. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #16
    don't care, charge them OR let them go.
     
  16. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #17
    We have a constitution that guarantees people the right to a trial. If they are a threat we could have tried them and locked them away forever, the courts have done a good job with the terrorism cases they've been allowed to try.
     
  17. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #18
    we HAD that. no more
    https://www.aclu.org/news/president-obama-signs-indefinite-detention-bill-law
     
  18. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #19

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