U.S.Supreme Court Denies Stay of Execution

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Huntn, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. Huntn, Sep 21, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #1
    Troy Davis Put To Death

    Amnesty International Article

    NYTimes Article

    After the applause dies down from the Tea Party, I'll say I have been against the Death Penalty ever since it has been proven through DNA evidence that innocent people are sitting on death row and innocent people have been put to death by their respective State. This case in particular is troubling when afterwards, people who gave evidence implicating Davis, recanted saying they had been coerced. I can't believe if there were irregularities in testimony that Georgia would still push for Death instead of Life in Imprisonment. It makes me feel ill.
     
  2. Illuminated macrumors 6502a

    Illuminated

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    #2
    I have lost faith in our government tonight. Its hard to live in a country that kills innocent people.

    We are not greater than any other country out there. RIP Troy Davis.
     
  3. Huntn, Sep 21, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011

    Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #3
    The way the System works today, if you are for the Death Penalty, by default you are for murdering innocent people of crimes they did not commit. No all of those convicted of murder, just enough that it makes the process untenable to anyone with a conscious. I can't live with that, the Governor of George Ryan, a Republican could not live with it in 2002 and put a stay of execution on all Illinois Death row inmates. And no surprise, our anti-intellectual bubba President who presided over a record 152 executions in Texas, had no problem with executions.
     
  4. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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  5. Moyank24 macrumors 601

    Moyank24

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    #5
    It will probably be merged with the thread that was posted at the exact same time. that one is already in the PRSI
     
  6. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #6
    I am pro death penalty only if it is proven without a shadow of a doubt. This case is very troubling as there was serious doubt and if there is any question you can't execute. I am certain that the only reason this went through was because it was a cop that was killed.
     
  7. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #7
    That, in theory, is what happens during the trial. Not that it does.

    Aside from ethical considerations, my objection to the death penalty is the "OOPS" factor. If evidence exonerates a convicted individual, applying the death penalty rules out the possibility of saying "oops, sorry".

    Since our justice system is dependent upon humans, and humans are fallible, taking actions that cannot be reversed guarantees errors - i.e. killing an innocent person.
     
  8. BigPrince macrumors 68020

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    #8
    I am sure one of the Justices argued that the very fact this was his 4th time facing execution is somehow in and of itself cruel and unusual (in violation of the 8th amendment thus making it a constitutional question) and on those grounds alone should of found justiciable grounds to bring this case up....but instead the court decided to not attack Capital Punishment because we would rather be deciding state elections or something that doesn't involve life or death.
     
  9. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #9
    Since we are talking about the U.S. Justice System I'll throw out this link, Newsweek: Jim Webb's Last Crusade (Republican Virginia Senator) his efforts to help fix our system.

     
  10. Bonch macrumors 6502

    Bonch

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    #10
    I'm pro death penalty. Frankly, I think anyone convicted of a Class A felony should get knocked off within one week of conviction. That would get things moving in the right direction fast in this country. But alas, our elected pussies, I mean officials, will be the death of all of us.
     
  11. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #11

    Excellent idea. Might I suggest we knock them off by stoning them in the public square. Then all citizens can partake in Democracy. :rolleyes:
     
  12. Bonch macrumors 6502

    Bonch

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    #12
    I'd be up for the public hangings of yore. Like the gang that killed Lincoln, that kind of thing. But stonings would be cool too. No kids though. Just hang those little buggers.
     
  13. wordoflife macrumors 604

    wordoflife

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    #13
    It's especially saddening to see a case like this result in capital punishment when people like Casey Anthony are "not guilty"
     
  14. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #14
    All convictions, minor or serious, are supposed to be "beyond a shadow of a doubt". In theory, every single person on death row has been proven to be guilty, beyond a shadow of a doubt. Actual experience, on the other hand.....
     
  15. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #15
    Odds are she is guilty, however you want the protections/processes that exist within our legal system to allow someone off whose case has not proven beyond a doubt. I say this because if the choice is lock up/execute the innocent or allow the guilty to go free, if you can can't avoid both, you want to err so the former is avoided. Although the justice system has convicted and executed innocent people. The other problem is jurys. As with OJ, jurys don't guarantee justice.

    As far as Anthony, was she involved with her dead child? I'd say yes. Did she murder her child or was it an accidental death that she tried to cover up? My impression is that based on the trial, that is not known with certainty. Is she a sociopath? Possibly/probably.
     
  16. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    #16
    Read the three articles. Did I miss some mention of the Tea Party, or was that simply the hourly PRSI-Tea Party conflation?
     
  17. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #17
    Haven't you heard? Tea Party crowds cheer vigorously at debates when the political candidates speak of how many executions they've had in their state. They deserve honorable mention. :rolleyes:
     
  18. wordoflife macrumors 604

    wordoflife

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    #18
    What I'm saying is that there wasn't enough evidence to prove she was guilty and she was let out free. But, despite the lack of evidence, Troy was put to death. That doesn't make sense to me.
     
  19. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #19
    I'm not justifying... the difference was that Davis was convicted and Anthony was not, and then Davis was sentenced to death, for whatever reason you want to debate. Was the Anthony jury more sympathetic to a white mom versus a southern jury was less sympathetic to a black man who killed a white? I can't say, but it is the basis for speculation and debate. My concern is when you have a majority of witnesses recanting their stories, and irregularities in evidence, at least according to what I've read...

    It is the characteristic of an uncivilized society...
     
  20. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #20
    I think, reasonably, even lifetime incarceration without possibility of parole is inherently incompatible with a free state. Our liberty depends on a contract between us and our state in which we sacrifice in the form of responsibilities and benefit in the form of rights and safeguards. If we permanently and irrevocably sever that compact on one side, then we essentially destroy any responsibility of the individual towards the state. If I were sentenced to prison for the rest of my life, without the possibility of parole, and essentially with the vast majority of my rights permanently nullified, it is reasonable for me to attempt to use any means, including use of lethal force, to attempt to obtain my freedom again. I might not succeed, but I no longer really have anything to lose, and as a living being I am self-obligated to try to be free.

    Of course, I'm not sure what the alternative is, in the absence of any sort of wilderness into which society's malcontents could be banished.
     
  21. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #21
    That's an interesting idea. It's not a matter of compassion to me, but of protecting democracy -- I care about the potential of wrong done to an individual but I care much more about the state.

    You bring up one very important case, which is the one most germane to this thread: that the person may later turn out to be innocent (or at least not demonstrably guilty).

    I think the other legitimate concern is one where the person no longer clearly poses an elevated risk to society and incarceration is expensive and doesn't really accomplish anything further than satiating a thirst for vengeance. If I were making up my own fantasy world, I would say it is right to permanently excommunicate a person who commits a serious crime from one's fellowship, even if that meant that, left to the elements, they would die. I do not think it is right to actively incarcerate them permanently, and moreover, it creates a captive body of people who have no reason to not act as enemies of the state. Of course, if you expel them, there's still no reason for them not to act as enemies of the state, but at least it's a liberty maximizing solution.

    Maybe this part is just an emotion on my part, but I do not think it's a legitimate business of government to satiate a thirst for vengeance. At least, I don't want to pay for it, let alone be a part of it.
     

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