UMPC – OneMix 3S Platinum

Queen6

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For the best part of the year my secondary on the go notebook for the field has been Acer’s Switch 5 (i3, 4Gb, 128 SSD + 256 microSD). Truly proving it’s worth thanks to it’s flexible 2in1 format, sensible features and representing tremendous value at just $650, equally time for a change.

Enter One-Netbook’s, OneMix 3S Platinum a 2in1 that many will likely have never come across, if ever heard of at all. The 3S Platinum is a very different beast being a premium Yoga style 2in1 device, most jarringly is the diminutive form factor with just an 8.4” display as the notebook is an Ultra-Mobile PC (UMPC) class device.

The 3S Platinum is by no means a budget device coming to the market with a four figure price point. The notebook offers many of the features one would expect in a similarly priced full sized 2in1 such as; ports, full Touch & Pen support, backlit keyboard, SD Card reader, HiDPI 360-hinge display (2560×1600) and premium build quality. Performance is brisk thanks to Intel’s i7-8500Y, 16Gb RAM & 512 Micro PCIe NVMe SSD as long as the expectation is balanced, with the 3S generally feeling much snappier than the Acer Switch 5.

The CPU is an Intel Y series processor, therefore TDP bound with a PL1/PL2 of just 7W/15W so most definitely not a system suited for heavy workloads. For day to day basic productivity the 3S Platinum is best described as snappy thanks to the i7’s high boost clocks of 4.2GHz. Sustained heavy loads just no, being TDP limited to around 2.3GHz across both cores or 3.1GHz on a single core, which is fine given the base CPU clock frequency is just 1.5GHz.

Thermals are reasonable, the CPU can get up there (90C) under full Turbo, however it will always be rained in by the TDP limits. Even running the likes of Cinebench R15 doesn't push the thermal envelope. The notebook has an active cooling system, fan is audible when the system is really pushed hard. For the most part the fan is inoffensive, with a silent low power mode available (TDP down). The chassis can get warm to the touch being fully CNC machined aluminium with just the footprint of the average 8” Android tablet.

The 2560×1600 display is crisp and bright, indoors rarely needing to exceed 25%. Touch and Pen (4096 levels) support work as advertised. I opted for a Surface Pen 2 for no other reason than convenience, One Netbook does offer an OEM pen at a lower price point. No artist here, equally as the saying goes “it just works” any Pen following the MS protocol should work with the 3S Platinum’s display.

Battery life too soon to really say, I rather expect around 5-6 hours of continuous usage, 7 hours might be a stretch. Much will depend on the display’s brightness level and frequently the i7-8500Y processor Turbo’s to high clock’s. This is where the silent mode will be more useful by reducing the CPU’s power limits and fan activity. With W10 fully up, Wi-Fi & Bluetooth mouse connected, playing video off a microSD card 7-1/2 hours is easily attainable in full power mode.

Quirks abound :p driven by the notebooks diminutive form factor; keyboard layout isn't standard, however the typing experience is genuinely good once one is used to the layout, miles better than my 2015 Retina MacBook. Camera’s or more to the point the lack of them, personally I’m fine omission as this serves to help reduce the footprint. Such small cameras are generally of poor quality and in some circumstance advantageous professionally.

No trackpad? Well yes and no as the 3S Platinum has a tiny optical touch sensor which takes some time to adjust too, equally once acquainted the touch sensor performs adequately. The notebook has a reasonable selection of ports, offering; USB C & A, microSD card reader and Mini HDMI which IMO is a weak point. Mini HDMI in my experience is prone to failure, personally I opt for full size HDMI over USB C with a small portable dock that also expands connectivity significantly. Audio is delivered by a single mono speaker buried deep in the chassis, safe to say it’s serviceable. Volume is reasonable given the small size of the notebook and has an almost 360 degree sound stage as the audio is fired upwards at the user through the keyboard and rearwards out the cooling vents.

The 8.4” 3S Platinum is most definitely not for all, being both very niche and expensive for what it delivers, however for those that need a full desktop OS and specifically want 8” tablet mobility this is the one. There are other UMPC’s out there with even smaller 5” & 7” displays. Personally I feel these are too small to be usable for my needs, nor do they offer the same level of performance. In regular use the 3S Platinum is beautifully fluid and presents no issues.

I’ve used other 8” tablet based UMPC’s in the past and I really like the format, The 3S Platinum is a level up being a Yoga type device with a far superior keyboard and features. The 3S Platinum excels as it’s the first UMPC that feels like a regular notebook in use and with USB C expansion a docked desktop solution is just one step away. The 3S Platinum connected to 4TB of SSD storage and a 43” 4K display makes for a compelling solution as long as the usage/workflow is not heavily biased to CPU/GPU cores/wattage, and one that you can literally fold up and put in your jacket pocket.

Room for improvement, well always the case :p I'd like to see the Mini HDMI depreciated and replaced with a 2nd USB C port, stereo speakers would be nice. Such UMPC's might also be good candidates for the likes of the new ARM Snapdragon 8CX, although it may be difficult for smaller OEM's such One Netbook to bring to market, without some level of support from the likes of Microsoft. As I use the 3S Platinum no doubt other things will come to mind :)

OneMix.jpg

I’ll post some pictures if people are interested.

Specs:
Display 8.4 inch, 2560 x 1600 pixels, 360 degree hinge
CPU Intel Core i7-8500Y processor
RAM 16GB
Storage 512GB PCIe NVMe SSD + microSD card reader
A/V Micro HDMI (1.4), 3.5mm audio jack, mono speaker
USB 1 USB 3.0 Type-C, 1 USB Type-A
WiFi 802.11ac
BT Bluetooth 4.0
Keyboard 6 rows, 67 keys, backlit, fingerprint scanner
Touch Touchscreen + active pen + optical touch sensor
Battery 8600mAh
Charger 30W USB-C power adapter
Weight 0.65Kg/1.5 pounds
Dimensions 204x129x14.9mm
Price around $760 and up (starting with m3-8100Y, 8GB, 256 SSD)

Q-6
 

Queen6

macrumors 604
Original poster
Nice review

Want to see more of these Micro Laptops

Spec wise puts my GO to shame :D
There's a growing selection of UMPC's now; One Netbook, GPD, Chuwi & MAG1 that I'm aware of, likely more. One Netbook sets itself aside as a more premium OEM with more features, faster processors etc. and 2in1 360 hinge designs. GPD are I believe basic clamshell designs, Chuwi is between One Net Book & GPD also a 2in1, MAG1 is real new and yet to hit the market, clamshell design with the advantage of backlit KB & microSD card reader which beats out some of GPD's offerings.

All with displays from 6" all the way up to a staggering 8.9" :p Anyway the UMPC formfactor has been around for eons, however they have always been woefully slow due to CPU's, minimal RAM, and slow storage. 2019 very different, although you remain to pay a premium. That said OEM's are producing and designing ever more models, so someone is buying :)

I wouldn't want to live on a UMPC long-term by any means, however I find them to be a great deal more useful than the typical Android/IOS tablet solution, and now with portable USB C displays becoming ever cheaper they are becoming an ever more interesting prospect for those on the go.

Q-6
 
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SteveJUAE

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There's a growing selection of UMPC's now; One Netbook, GPD, Chuwi & MAG1 that I'm aware of, likely more. One Netbook sets itself aside as a more premium OEM with more features, faster processors etc. and 2in1 360 hinge designs. GPD are I believe basic clamshell designs, Chuwi is between One Net Book & GPD also a 2in1, MAG1 is real new and yet to hit the market, clamshell design with the advantage of backlit KB & microSD card reader which beats out some of GPD's offerings.

All with displays from 6" all the way up to a staggering 8.9" :p Anyway the UMPC formfactor has been around for eons, however they have always been woefully slow due to CPU's, minimal RAM, and slow storage. 2019 very different, although you remain to pay a premium. That said OEM's are producing and designing ever more models, so someone is buying :)

I wouldn't want to live on a UMPC long-term by any means, however I find them to be a great deal more useful than the typical Android/IOS tablet solution, and now with portable USB C displays becoming ever cheaper they are becoming an ever more interesting prospect for those on the go.

Q-6
Agreed as full OS travel companion device they have a place

Just hope MS upspec the GO
 

raqball

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Nice!

Netbooks on the way back in? I had one back in the late 2000's and the size was great. Don't know if my old eyes could deal with the small screens anymore but when I could, the size was awesome for portability.
 

Queen6

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Original poster
Nice!

Netbooks on the way back in? I had one back in the late 2000's and the size was great. Don't know if my old eyes could deal with the small screens anymore but when I could, the size was awesome for portability.
3S Platinum comes with a default scaling of 250%, opted for 225% as it's a lot better around with W10 and maybe not so far behind or ahead of you in years :p 3S Platinum is not a Netbook as in the older definition, as it has a lot of upscale hardware, equally not a heavy lifter by any means.

3S Platinum is a very clean & fluid system, impressively so :cool: What appeals to me is the sheer portability, and the ability to dock and use as a low power desktop. My fear with the likes of the Microsoft SP6 and Acer Switch 5 is the vulnerability of the display in the field, a 360 degree hinge negates. I also have to be honest the 3S Platinum simply appeals to me :p For a UMPC the 3S Platinum it's a very capable device, I've a 12" Retina MacBook, the 3S Platinum is well ahead, equally one pays a premium for that.

If I was to use the 3S Platinum as primary system, I'd be looking to invest in a portable USB C display (12" - 17.5") as despite the limited TDP the 8.4" internal display is very much a governing factor :)

TBH UMPC's are so very niche, surprised we got this far with the thread :p

Q-6
 
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Queen6

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Nice!

Netbooks on the way back in? I had one back in the late 2000's and the size was great. Don't know if my old eyes could deal with the small screens anymore but when I could, the size was awesome for portability.
I've set the scaling to 225% and it's ok for me, default is 250% which was a little much and reduced the usability for my liking. Helps a lot that the display is petty decent, HiDPI & 16:10. For me the 3S Platinum is a great package and just upped the storage to 1TB thx to a microSD card.

It's Netbook size but with fair performance, can easily take on my Switch 5 and feels a lot snappier in use. Top build quality 3S Platinum feels like it's literally carved from a single billet, even the anodised finish feels looks and feels superior.

Zero bloat, it's premium priced, however I've no issue as the notebook delivers and when docked people are literally astonished that this tiny PC is behind it all :cool:

As I said someone has to buying UMPC's as they have maintained a market presence and if anything more are on the way from multiple OEM's, from 6" up to 8.9" both traditional clamshells and 2in1's. The 3S Platinum is one of the larger with an 8.4" display, GPD P2 Max being the largest at 8.9" One-Netbook who manufactures the 3S Platinum is also now looking at 10th Gen processors so seems to be no slowdown :)

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Silvestru Hosszu

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For me my Surface Go is borderline too small, something like this but with a 11`` screen and slim bezels would be ideal for my use case.
 

SteveJUAE

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For me my Surface Go is borderline too small, something like this but with a 11`` screen and slim bezels would be ideal for my use case.
If a new Go looses its borders/bezels it would be ideal screen wise, but some suggest it would be outside the free MS Office category so unlikely given it's primary target audience was education
 

Queen6

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For me my Surface Go is borderline too small, something like this but with a 11`` screen and slim bezels would be ideal for my use case.
I know that Xiao Mi produce a 12" small bezel clamshell notebook similar to Apple's depreciated Retina MacBook. Acer offers the Switch 5 also 12" very similar design to the SP6/GO.

Largest UMPC I'm aware of is the GPD P2 Max and that's, just 8.9" For me the 3S Platinum is fine, being a 16:10 aspect ratio helps. TBH I don't find it any more difficult to use than the Switch 5 and in some circumstance more usable as the display is far brighter.

I was put off the GO due to it's sluggish performance and very close to Switch 5 in design. In general I prefer the concept of a notebook that can morph into a tablet and media player, not vice versa. 3S Platinum all so appeals as it has several ports all of which I use and it can be docked for more expansion via USB C.

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Silvestru Hosszu

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I think that it really depends on ones usage scenario and habits.
For clamshells I prefer 14" or bigger, hence, my primary mobile device is a Matebook X Pro, although for short trips I prefer the MSI GS65.
For tablets I`ll go with the GO using it mainly to take notes (I`m a lawyer so I do that a lot) and the fact that it has a usable keyboard and full OS which makes it serviceable for my basic PC related stuff is a big advantage. So my use case is the opposite of yours, the tablet has to be able to do on occasion the job of a laptop.
To be honest, it is a little sluggish and better performance would not bother me but right now it just fits the bill.
 

SteveJUAE

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I'm still waiting to see what the Samsung Book S brings to the party :), not for me but for the Mrs MB12 2015 replacement, but if its zippy enough I can see it trickling down to smaller footprints

If MS do not upgrade the GO I may be tempted by some other UMPC as it is a bit slow but not limited like Mobile OS tablets

Not that I am overly bothered about warranty or support, ie if its broken just buy another :) but I don't have the same rapport with local OEM's that Q6 enjoys due to local and more to the point we get charged a premium on these less popular brands, that's not justified
 
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Silvestru Hosszu

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I had the MB12, nice machine but too small for a clamshell in my book.
The 11" Ipad Pro with a full fledged OS would be a killer machine for me.
 

Queen6

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Bee
I had the MB12, nice machine but too small for a clamshell in my book.
The 11" Ipad Pro with a full fledged OS would be a killer machine for me.
Been through endless tablets both android & IOS, realisation is that I need a full desktop OS period. 3S Platinum slaughters my Retina MacBook and being a big multitasker having 16GB makes all the difference.

Love these small formfactor devices, brings a smile to the face and can turn coin :cool:

Q-6
 

Queen6

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I'm still waiting to see what the Samsung Book S brings to the party :), not for me but for the Mrs MB12 2015 replacement, but if its zippy enough I can see it trickling down to smaller footprints

If MS do not upgrade the GO I may be tempted by some other UMPC as it is a bit slow but not limited like Mobile OS tablets

Not that I am overly bothered about warranty or support, ie if its broken just buy another :) but I don't have the same rapport with local OEM's that Q6 enjoys due to local and more to the point we get charged a premium on these less popular brands, that's not justified
Saved around $250 on the Amazon.com price with the 3S Platinum as I'm closer than most to the source, equally don't care as I'll be using the notebook professional in the field so it will pay for itself instantly.

Would like an ARM powered W10 device, however looking like W10S is a go, full W10 not so much, garbage benchmarks like Geekbench make the ARM processors look fairly rapid, however real-world they remain to be far too slow unless the usage is very light. Maybe the 8CX will be enough of an advancement, the Snapdragon 835 doesn't look like it can cut it.

3S Platinum is like the original Galaxy Book's, however with another bank of cylinders and twin turbo's :p

Q-6
 

Queen6

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One-Netbook just announced the One-Mix 3 Pro with Intel quad core Core i5-10210Y. Far as I know it's a drop in CPU with the rest of the spec same as my 3S Platinum.

I'll be interested to see the performance differential of the new i5-10210Y versus my i7-8500Y. Watching the Oct 2019 Microsoft event, nice start with SL 13 & 15, similar to the Microsoft's SL the One-Mix devices have that level of finish; edge to edge display, no visible gasket beautiful fit and finish all round :cool:

Q-6
 

maflynn

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The 3S Platinum is by no means a budget device coming to the market with a four figure price point.
To say this is pricey is a bit of an understatement. The concept is intriguing, but the price tag - around 1,300 makes it a tough sell imo. I'm not sure about i7 being in such a tiny form factor. Though the less expensive models are using M3's and what not

So far, I've not found a decent replacement for my iPad Pro, though I could see a UMPC maybe doing it
 

SteveJUAE

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To say this is pricey is a bit of an understatement. The concept is intriguing, but the price tag - around 1,300 makes it a tough sell imo. I'm not sure about i7 being in such a tiny form factor. Though the less expensive models are using M3's and what not

So far, I've not found a decent replacement for my iPad Pro, though I could see a UMPC maybe doing it
Yep 1.3k is an ouch bit I think Q6 gets them a bit cheaper locally :)
 

Queen6

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To say this is pricey is a bit of an understatement. The concept is intriguing, but the price tag - around 1,300 makes it a tough sell imo. I'm not sure about i7 being in such a tiny form factor. Though the less expensive models are using M3's and what not

So far, I've not found a decent replacement for my iPad Pro, though I could see a UMPC maybe doing it
Yep 1.3k is an ouch bit I think Q6 gets them a bit cheaper locally :)
I travel a lot so I tend to see decent deals :) There's certainly cheaper UMPC's out there, the One-Mix is the one that offers the most features being a full 2in1 with Pen support and it has 16GB RAM/512 SSD.

The i7 is still a Y series CPU so it doesn't pull a lot of watts or generate too much heat, and as with all it brings around 10%-12% more performance to the table. They have recently kicked up another level with the quad core 10th Gen CPU's which I'd like to see.

Bottom line is the One-Mix line is premium and it's very tangible similar to Mac's of old. I was also a little reticent until I physically saw one. I still took pause, however only for a couple of days, has to be said I want this small format the 3S Platinum offers and potentially the upcoming Windows Neo as I have a specific use case, and I do get a lot of mileage out of them.

Q-6
 

sracer

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The greatest thing holding me back from being seriously interested in the form-factor is the lack of quick-n-easy graphical scripting language for it. One of the great benefits to devices like the HP 100LX, HP OmniGo 100, Psion Series 3a, etc. was the ability to easily create apps that would really personalize the device.

I loved being able to quickly cobble something together with basic functionality to get using it right away, and then tweaking it and adding to it as I needed some new feature or function. This iterative approach made the device instantly useful and grow as my needs grow.

Then again, maybe I'm getting too old for this new technology. 😊
 
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SteveJUAE

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The greatest thing holding me back from being seriously interested in the form-factor is the lack of quick-n-easy graphical scripting language for it. One of the great benefits to devices like the HP 100LX, HP OmniGo 100, Psion Series 3a, etc. was the ability to easily create apps that would really personalize the device.

I loved being able to quickly cobble something together with basic functionality to get using it right away, and then tweaking it and adding to it as I needed some new feature or function. This iterative approach made the device instantly useful and grow as my needs grow.

Then again, maybe I'm getting too old for this new technology. 😊
Funny I did the opposite I returned my Psion and got the HP 200LX as the scripting language was propitiatory where the HP ran any DOS program :)

When you think these were full OS devices running 6 weeks on 2x3A batteries and connected to more devices than current smart phones they were uber cool in their day
 
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