UN report on drug problems in UK?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Happybunny, Feb 29, 2012.

  1. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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  2. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #2
    I think it's more widescale than the UN can ever know.

    Most Brits really don't care that much about drugs. You could talk all night to a group of people about social issues and drugs might never even come up. And if it does come up, it might be a cheeky reference to their personal use as a youth.

    The other thing is that coke is used by white collars and those in media/entertainment. That takes the taboo of it somewhat. I remember a random sweep in parliament some years ago found traces of coke on the toilet cisterns (basically MPs goin' in for a line every now and again).

    I rate binge drinking and drink related crime, teenage pregnancy rates and GPs handing out anti-psychotic meds as more worthwhile causes (for the UK) than illegal drugs. Especially cannabis.. wish they'd lay off that a bit.
     
  3. Mord macrumors G4

    Mord

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    #3
    The poll results are interesting, the telegraph is a right wing paper though even still legalisation is the most popular option.

    The data from that report is a few years out of date too, MDMA use is no longer in decline.
     
  4. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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    #4
    GPs don't hand out anti-psychotics, NiuNiu. Nutters are forwarded to Psychiatrists who decide whether or not to hand out that medication. And that's a rarity unless it's absolutely warranted.
     
  5. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #5
    I speak with customers everyday who are on anti-psychotics prescribed by their GPs. I've been offered them by a GP in Manchester after one time saying I was feeling down, (was really just tryin to get a sicknote for work).

    My mother has a cupboard full of them that she doesn't use - they give them to her to deal with her epidural. She doesn't need or use them. She recently by mistake took one thinking it was a pain killer - she ended up paralyzed in her sleep hallucinating that headless people were coming in and out of her bedroom.

    It's a huge industry in the UK and it's an embarrassment. Some people are on stacks of these drugs.

    Why are you saying GPs don't administer anti-psychotics anyway? It's well known they do and they've been warned about it in the past. It's not some personal axe I have - it's one that affects the country.
     
  6. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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    #6
    Did you mean epilepsy, as opposed to epidural? It's unlikely that you'd have an epidural at home.
     
  7. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #7
    Where did you get the idea she has an epidural at home?
     
  8. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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    #8
    You wouldn't ever be given anti-psychotics for an epidural, regardless.

    I probably got that impression as you said she has a bunch of drugs in her cupboard, which I assumed would have been at her home.
     
  9. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #9
    You mean, shouldn't?

    She was given amitriptyline. And anti-psychotics are sometimes used for pain relief. This particular one is used in situations where the spine is inflamed.
     
  10. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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    #10
    Amitriptyline is additionally a pain-killer. Many drugs work in different contexts to those that they are initially developed for. It does not make them explicitly one thing or the other.

    Aspirin is primarily an analgesic, but as a side-effect, extended use can cut the risk of a heart attack. That still doesn't make it explicitly a heart medicine.
     
  11. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #11

    Amitriptyline a tricyclic antidepressant. It is the most widely used TCA and has at least equal efficacy against depression as the newer class of SSRIs.As well as reducing depressive symptoms, these type of tricyclics also ease migraines, tension headaches, anxiety attacks and some schizophrenic symptoms.

    Medical uses

    Amitriptyline is used for a number of medical conditions including: depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine prophylaxis, eating disorders, bipolar disorder, post-herpetic neuralgia, and insomnia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amitriptyline


    Aye, painkiller is the adequate description for that.
     
  12. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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    #12
    It's a commonly used painkiller for neuritic pain.
     
  13. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #13
    Recap time.
    http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/newsart...bing-antipsychotics-to-patients-with-dementia
    1800 deaths a year of dementia patients from GP prescribed anti-psychotics.




    Editing your posts after confronted with facts. But trying to reduce amitrip. to a 'painkiller' was classy. Clearly you've never taken it.




    Squawk.



    Now I want to know why I'm getting eric/'d. Are you a GP?
     
  14. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

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    #14
    I am not a GP, I am no fan of people making sweeping generalisations either.

    Have you taken Amitriptyline? It is not a go-to painkiller, but it's not exactly a go-to anti-psych medicine either, it has its uses, dependant on a specific set of circumstances and as with all drugs will be used on a case by case basis. There are preferable drugs dependant on the problem.

    As per your point re: GPs. The vast majority of anti-psychotic prescriptions in the community are obviously dispensed by GPs, but they are mostly prescribed based on information from the patient's Psychiatrist that advises the course of treatment.

    GPs may also prescribe recurrent anti-psych meds to geriatric patients that have a tendency to become routinely unwell, this is not necessarily a bad thing.

    FYI, cannabis isn't exactly all that safe over extended periods, either.

    Also, I don't see where it says that there are "1800 deaths a year of dementia patients from GP prescribed anti-psychotics."

    Besides the fact that such a statement is fairly disingenuous, people in the age bracket for suffering from dementia are more at risk of death anyway. How much of that can be directly attributed to meds is anyone's guess.
     
  15. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    #15
    If only politicians would wake up and admit that their strict drugs policies are NOT WORKING. :mad::rolleyes: I've been banging on this drum for years and I grow tired of it.
     

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