Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

jsf721

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Dec 27, 2011
417
10
Li, NY
I am extremely upset that I need to use 2 factor authentication to use the air tags. I find 2 factor authentication to be a huge inconvenience.

If one of my family members decides to watch a movie on Apple TV, I need to authenticate it and its a pain.

I am seriously considering returning these as I do not think I live with the 2 factor Authentication.
 

russell_314

macrumors 603
Feb 10, 2019
6,151
9,202
USA
I am extremely upset that I need to use 2 factor authentication to use the air tags. I find 2 factor authentication to be a huge inconvenience.

If one of my family members decides to watch a movie on Apple TV, I need to authenticate it and its a pain.

I am seriously considering returning these as I do not think I live with the 2 factor Authentication.
What are you talking about? The only time I get asked for 2FA is on a new device or webpage login. I never get asked for 2FA for my existing devices
 

Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
34,983
51,016
In the middle of several books.
I am extremely upset that I need to use 2 factor authentication to use the air tags. I find 2 factor authentication to be a huge inconvenience.

If one of my family members decides to watch a movie on Apple TV, I need to authenticate it and its a pain.

I am seriously considering returning these as I do not think I live with the 2 factor Authentication.
If a family member is using the same account, there is no 2FA requirement involved to watch a movie. 2FA is an excellent security feature that everyone should be using, in my opinion.
 

jsf721

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Dec 27, 2011
417
10
Li, NY
If a family member is using the same account, there is no 2FA requirement involved to watch a movie. 2FA is an excellent security feature that everyone should be using, in my opinion.
I got a new phone a while ago and unknow to me the 2FA was turned on by default. That night my son called from college to say the Apple TV he was renting a movie on asked for a code? I looked at my phone and there was a code in my text. I gave it to him and he was good for him. I called apple care and they said yes you need to enter a code when 2FA is active. I said I don't want 2FA, they had ne go to my email that apple sent and turn it off. After 14 days it cannot be turned off at all.

It may well me I don't understand what's involved and perhaps it not as inconvenient as I've made it in my head but I don't want to be prompted for codes each night my kids rent movies (of when I do). Lucky me my apple ID is tied to just about everything.
 

Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
34,983
51,016
In the middle of several books.
I got a new phone a while ago and unknow to me the 2FA was turned on by default. That night my son called from college to say the Apple TV he was renting a movie on asked for a code? I looked at my phone and there was a code in my text. I gave it to him and he was good for him. I called apple care and they said yes you need to enter a code when 2FA is active. I said I don't want 2FA, they had ne go to my email that apple sent and turn it off. After 14 days it cannot be turned off at all.

It may well me I don't understand what's involved and perhaps it not as inconvenient as I've made it in my head but I don't want to be prompted for codes each night my kids rent movies (of when I do). Lucky me my apple ID is tied to just about everything.
If the Apple TV your son was using wasn’t already logged into your account, it would ask for 2FA when signing in.
 

fischersd

macrumors 603
Oct 23, 2014
5,370
1,936
Port Moody, BC, Canada
Op, I think you're painting yourself into a corner. Eventually it's going to be mandatory. (I suspect both Apple Pay as well as the digital ID's that Apple is now embracing, the financial and government entities will be requiring this in time).

Trust the new devices when you enable their login with 2FA - then you don't get prompted for that device again. Once all of your devices are authenticated it's painless.
 

Malus120

macrumors 6502a
Jun 28, 2002
680
1,415
While 2FA can seem like a pain at first:
1. it's there to protect you, your account, and everything tied to it (which you admit you have a lot of)
2.Apple isn't the only company (slowly) moving to making 2FA a requirement.
3. You should be using it.
4. Once properly set up, it's actually not inconvenient at all.

Here's how it works.
1. You turn on 2FA.
2. You are required to re-authenticate on all of your devices
3. Once you re-authenticate a device (put in that code), you'll never have to do it again unless you change your password or sign out.
4. Any device that is authenticated can also authenticate (receive codes) to authenticate other new devices.

I know it sounds like a hassle, but honestly, even if multiple people are using the account, it's a one time deal. Once a device is authenticated it won't ask for a code again.

Why is this more secure?
Quite simply, it means someone needs not only your Apple ID password, but also physical access to one of your devices to access your account. Most people choose easy to guess (and or easy to brute-force hack) passwords. Furthermore, if you ever reuse passwords/email addresses across multiple services, if there is a data breach somewhere, there is a very real risk of your account being compromised.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

chrfr

macrumors G5
Jul 11, 2009
13,592
7,134
I got a new phone a while ago and unknow to me the 2FA was turned on by default. That night my son called from college to say the Apple TV he was renting a movie on asked for a code?
This is a case where Family Sharing might be more appropriate, and then he'd get the 2FA requests for his account directly.
 

KOTN91

macrumors 6502a
Nov 23, 2017
678
550
2FA is the most absurd thing ever. Get a code sent to the phone you just lost so you can log into iCloud to find your phone. Yeah great logic! Just last week I lost my phone and if I had 2FA enabled I’d never be able to access iCloud again. Honestly whoever decided this was a good idea deserves to be taken round the back of the building at Cupertino and shot
 

Ifti

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2010
3,991
2,564
UK
2FA is the most absurd thing ever. Get a code sent to the phone you just lost so you can log into iCloud to find your phone. Yeah great logic! Just last week I lost my phone and if I had 2FA enabled I’d never be able to access iCloud again. Honestly whoever decided this was a good idea deserves to be taken round the back of the building at Cupertino and shot

You have the option to enter Find My directly without needing to authenticate with a code. Try it by logging into icloud on a computer.......
Without 2FA entered you just cant see all your other data but you CAN track your devices, place them in lost mode, remote wipe, and so on.
 

fischersd

macrumors 603
Oct 23, 2014
5,370
1,936
Port Moody, BC, Canada
2FA is the most absurd thing ever. Get a code sent to the phone you just lost so you can log into iCloud to find your phone. Yeah great logic! Just last week I lost my phone and if I had 2FA enabled I’d never be able to access iCloud again. Honestly whoever decided this was a good idea deserves to be taken round the back of the building at Cupertino and shot
...and most people have more than one device logged into iCloud. The 2FA prompt is sent to any/all of your devices that have a valid session. (but, as noted above, there are other recovery options you can setup).

Hell, authorize a browser on a system you have routinely access to.
 
  • Like
Reactions: haruhiko

jsf721

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Dec 27, 2011
417
10
Li, NY
While 2FA can seem like a pain at first:
1. it's there to protect you, your account, and everything tied to it (which you admit you have a lot of)
2.Apple isn't the only company (slowly) moving to making 2FA a requirement.
3. You should be using it.
4. Once properly set up, it's actually not inconvenient at all.

Here's how it works.
1. You turn on 2FA.
2. You are required to re-authenticate on all of your devices
3. Once you re-authenticate a device (put in that code), you'll never have to do it again unless you change your password or sign out.
4. Any device that is authenticated can also authenticate (receive codes) to authenticate other new devices.

I know it sounds like a hassle, but honestly, even if multiple people are using the account, it's a one time deal. Once a device is authenticated it won't ask for a code again.

Why is this more secure?
Quite simply, it means someone needs not only your Apple ID password, but also physical access to one of your devices to access your account. Most people choose easy to guess (and or easy to brute-force hack) passwords. Furthermore, if you ever reuse passwords/email addresses across multiple services, if there is a data breach somewhere, there is a very real risk of your account being compromised.
Thanks for the explanation, If its a one and done that would be acceptable.

Can you (or anyome else ) please explain how to use family sharing so the person using the service gets the authorization code.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

KOTN91

macrumors 6502a
Nov 23, 2017
678
550
...and most people have more than one device logged into iCloud. The 2FA prompt is sent to any/all of your devices that have a valid session. (but, as noted above, there are other recovery options you can setup).

Hell, authorize a browser on a system you have routinely access to.

That doesn’t work. Surely not everyone has multiple iOS devices. That’s not a given by any means and why should it be. And if you do, what if you don’t have those other devices on you at that exact moment? What if you are on holiday or at a festival and you lose your phone? How do you log into iCloud then and get for instance, important contacts. As for trusted numbers how ridiculous. Had nobody at Apple ever heard of a relationship breakdown?

With obvious pitfalls such as these, for minimal benefit, it’s amazing that anyone uses it and it has to be said the sheer inconvenience (or worse permanently being locked out of iCloud) is very un-Apple
 

KOTN91

macrumors 6502a
Nov 23, 2017
678
550
Total rubbish.

2FA is a widely used secure method to protect your data.

Your personal anecdotal experience is 100% irrelevant.
It’s not irrelevant to me. Had i had your beloved 2FA enabled I would have been totally screwed but because I had to the foresight to make sure it wasn’t enabled, it totally saved the day. More than once too

As for protecting data well my data probably would have been inaccessible forever had I had 2FA enabled, which is far worse than the off chance that someone will want to try and guess correctly my iCloud password

2FA is like using a nuclear bomb to kill a nest of ants
 
Last edited by a moderator:

fischersd

macrumors 603
Oct 23, 2014
5,370
1,936
Port Moody, BC, Canada
That doesn’t work. Surely not everyone has multiple iOS devices. That’s not a given by any means and why should it be. And if you do, what if you don’t have those other devices on you at that exact moment? What if you are on holiday or at a festival and you lose your phone? How do you log into iCloud then and get for instance, important contacts. As for trusted numbers how ridiculous. Had nobody at Apple ever heard of a relationship breakdown?

With obvious pitfalls such as these, for minimal benefit, it’s amazing that anyone uses it and it has to be said the sheer inconvenience (or worse permanently being locked out of iCloud) is very un-Apple
Multiple Apple devices. TVOS, MacOS, iOS, iPadOS. Also, you could have an authorized browser that you can login to iCloud with.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

KOTN91

macrumors 6502a
Nov 23, 2017
678
550
Multiple Apple devices. TVOS, MacOS, iOS, iPadOS. Also, you could have an authorized browser that you can login to iCloud with.

That’s not much good if you don’t have them on you at that exact time. Tell me, what do I do then?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TiggrToo

macrumors 601
Aug 24, 2017
4,205
8,838
It’s not irrelevant to me, genius. Had i had your beloved 2FA enabled I would have been totally screwed but because I had to the foresight to make sure it wasn’t enabled, it totally saved the day. More than once too

As for protecting data well my data probably would have been inaccessible forever had I had 2FA enabled, which is far worse than the off chance that someone will want to try and guess correctly my iCloud password

2FA is like using a nuclear bomb to kill a nest of ants
Actually it’s not, and you are placing personal experience over practicality.

You not personally not liking 2FA in no way negates it’s need.
 

fischersd

macrumors 603
Oct 23, 2014
5,370
1,936
Port Moody, BC, Canada
That’s not much good if you don’t have them on you at that exact time. Tell me, what do I do then?
Heh...so you have multiple recovery options (that's one). You can have additional trusted numbers.

Sorry, I don't see a scenario that I couldn't wait to setup a new iPhone until I have access to an authenticated device.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Like
Reactions: seezar

Ifti

macrumors 68040
Dec 14, 2010
3,991
2,564
UK
That’s not much good if you don’t have them on you at that exact time. Tell me, what do I do then?
You do not need 2FA to use Find My via iCloud.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

KOTN91

macrumors 6502a
Nov 23, 2017
678
550
Heh...so you have multiple recovery options (that's one). You can have additional trusted numbers.

Sorry, I don't see a scenario that I couldn't wait to setup a new iPhone until I have access to an authenticated device.

Both of those options are highly flawed for reasons I have already explained. This far outweighs any benefit of 2FA
 

TiggrToo

macrumors 601
Aug 24, 2017
4,205
8,838
Both of those options are highly flawed for reasons I have already explained. This far outweighs any benefit of 2FA

Apple provide other methods, including returning a 6 digit code Apple deliver to your primary email address and also utilizing the account recovery process.

You failing to follow those steps is all on you. What’s next, blaming someone when you loose your house key and then claiming that it’s much better not to lock your house up?
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.