Video Game union?


LordVic

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Sep 7, 2011
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well, it’s possible getting the gaming industry vote can get someone elected.

BERNIE SANDERS CALLS FOR VIDEO GAME INDUSTRY UNIONIZATION

https://www.ign.com/articles/2019/06/19/bernie-sanders-calls-for-video-game-industry-unionization
Any industry in which employees do not believe they have sufficient ability to negotiate for equal treatment. Proper pay, or safety and protection, should have all the right to unionize to keep industry owners honest.

I don't know enough about the modern video game industry, but if theres a gross inequality facing those workers, than unionization could be a great move.
 

JagdTiger

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Any industry in which employees do not believe they have sufficient ability to negotiate for equal treatment. Proper pay, or safety and protection, should have all the right to unionize to keep industry owners honest.

I don't know enough about the modern video game industry, but if theres a gross inequality facing those workers, than unionization could be a great move.
Yes but is this just hype for a election campaign?
 
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LordVic

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Yes but is this just hype for a election campaign?
At this point? Probably.

Sander's getting involved is likely campaign related.

but just cause Sander's is getting his name involved doesn't change whether or not what he says is truth or not.
 

JayMysterio

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Solomani

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At this point? Probably.

Sander's getting involved is likely campaign related.

but just cause Sander's is getting his name involved doesn't change whether or not what he says is truth or not.
Problem is…. the video game industry is not monolithic. It's hard to unionize an entire industry that's fragmented. Some industry employees (under huge labels like Sony, Nintendo or Electronic Arts) make huge bucks, others are part-time contractors barely scraping a living. Many of the successful and influential ones are actually in "management", for example the brilliant Art Directors, Creative Directors, etc. So by their nature, managers would normally be exempt from unionization. And then you have the global fragmentation. Many (original) US video game companies have already relocated/outsourced much of their resources to overseas. Like if you try to unionize several thousand of Nintendo's American employees, do you also unionize the Japanese ones? Impossible. SEGA has long moved much of its resources and subsidiaries to Europe. Beamdog, BioWare and similar successful video game studios have their content headquarters in Canada. It's close to impossible to impose consistent union policies and rules across international borders. The labor union laws of Canada, Japan, China, USA, and Europe have gross differences. I play video/electronic/PC games all the time, it's one area I throw much of my "expendable income". I've paid hundreds of dollars to attend electronic game related conventions…. like PAX, E3, ComicCons, etc. I know a thing or two how the industry works. Let me tell you…. it's a very fragmented and scattered industry. Coming up with union laws, regulations and policies that are sensible, fair and consistent across this industry…… is a daunting effort.

Clearly, Bern has not thought this out very much. It's just a campaign talking point. Sounds good in theory. Near-impossible to implement.
 

LordVic

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Sep 7, 2011
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Problem is…. the video game industry is not monolithic. It's hard to unionize an entire industry that's fragmented. Some industry employees (under huge labels like Sony, Nintendo or Electronic Arts) make huge bucks, others are part-time contractors barely scraping a living. Many of the successful and influential ones are actually in "management", for example the brilliant Art Directors, Creative Directors. So by their nature, managers would normally be exempt from unionization. And then you have the global fragmentation. Many (original) US video game companies have already relocated/outsourced much of their resources to overseas. Like if you try to unionize several thousand of Nintendo's American employees, do you also unionize the Japanese ones? Impossible. SEGA has long moved much of its resources and subsidiaries to Europe. Beamdog, BioWare and similar successful video game studios have their content headquarters in Canada. It's close to impossible to impose consistent union policies and rules across international borders. The labor union laws of Canada, Japan, China, USA, and Europe have gross differences. I play video/electronic/PC games all the time, it's one area I throw much of my "expendable income". I've paid hundreds of dollars to attend electronic game related conventions…. like PAX, E3, ComicCons, etc. I know a thing or tow how the industry works. Let me tell you…. it's a very fragmented and scattered industry. Coming up with union laws, regulations and policies that are sensible, fair and consistent across this industry…… is a daunting effort.

Clearly, Bern has not thought this out very much. It's just a campaign talking point. Sounds good in theory. Near-impossible to implement.
hey, never said it was logical or easy.

But all employees should have the right to unionize if they so wish.
 

JagdTiger

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Problem is…. the video game industry is not monolithic. It's hard to unionize an entire industry that's fragmented. Some industry employees (under huge labels like Sony, Nintendo y.or Electronic Arts) make huge bucks, others are part-time contractors barely scraping a living. Many of the successful and influential ones are actually in "management", for example the brilliant Art Directors, Creative Directors, etc. So by their nature, managers would normally be exempt from unionization. And then you have the global fragmentation. Many (original) US video game companies have already relocated/outsourced much of their resources to overseas. Like if you try to unionize several thousand of Nintendo's American employees, do you also unionize the Japanese ones? Impossible. SEGA has long moved much of its resources and subsidiaries to Europe. Beamdog, BioWare and similar successful video game studios have their content headquarters in Canada. It's close to impossible to impose consistent union policies and rules across international borders. The labor union laws of Canada, Japan, China, USA, and Europe have gross differences. I play video/electronic/PC games all the time, it's one area I throw much of my "expendable income". I've paid hundreds of dollars to attend electronic game related conventions…. like PAX, E3, ComicCons, etc. I know a thing or two how the industry works. Let me tell you…. it's a very fragmented and scattered industry. Coming up with union laws, regulations and policies that are sensible, fair and consistent across this industry…… is a daunting effort.

Clearly, Bern has not thought this out very much. It's just a campaign talking point. Sounds good in theory. Near-impossible to implement.
When computer and video games became big business this occurred, it was not like this when it was just a hobby.
 

LordVic

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When computer and video games became big business this occurred, it was not like this when it was just a hobby.
This is fairly true.

When I was growing up and gaming was really starting. A lot, if not the bulk of game programers were geeks and nerds who had a dream of a game. It was all about making that dream come to reality. And if they got rich in it? AWESOME.

now, it's like any other big business. Corporate overlords dictate to the dreamers when and what they can do. Force specifics into games that might not have otherwise been included. And often set unreasonable deadlines for their developers to meet. The actual game dev's have almost no powers now in the very companies that rely on them to produce. Developers also now make little from that game development since the bulk goes to the publisher house that is running the game house (Looking at you EA, Activision, and your ilk)

This has led to game developers surpressed wages with massively unreasonable hours and deadlines. Had a few friends who went into the game industry and they all burned out very fast because the publisher's demands for a release schedule were insane. Talking about doing 18-20 hour work days for months to meet those deadlines. They all eventually dropped out of the industry when they started families and realized that sort of lifestyle was not sustainable long term.

There are very few gaming companies left that are still large enough to produce A quality work who have their own destinies in their hands. Everyone else has been swallowed up by the large publishing companies.
 
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