Vinyl to FLAC - how to?

Giuanniello

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 21, 2012
397
125
Capri - Italy
Just wondering how to rip a vinyl to a digital file using a turntable (not one of the usb output ones!), an analog preamplifier and a computer.

I imagine I should take probably a tape out from the preamp and input it into the Mac audio-in and then run a software like Audacity, am I correct about it?

Any source where I can read how to perform such a thing?

Grazie


Giovanni
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
18,241
6,094
1. Connect turntable to Mac (or audio input device)
2. Record to either AIFF or WAV format
3. Apply any noise reduction or click removal (unless that's automatically done during the transfer)
4. Use a utility to convert from AIFF/WAV to FLAC.

My opinion only:
Considering the original source is vinyl, you could probably create 320k mp3 files, without any "loss of quality".
Files would be much smaller.
 
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BrianBaughn

macrumors 604
Feb 13, 2011
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Baltimore, Maryland
You are correct, OP, on connecting your preamp's tape OUT (with a left/right RCA to 3.5mm stereo adapter cable) to the Mac's input since the old school turntable "phono level" isn't adequate for the Mac's input.
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,612
424
Redondo Beach, California
Just wondering how to rip a vinyl to a digital file using a turntable (not one of the usb output ones!), an analog preamplifier and a computer.

I imagine I should take probably a tape out from the preamp and input it into the Mac audio-in and then run a software like Audacity, am I correct about it?

Any source where I can read how to perform such a thing?

Grazie


Giovanni
What you say is about the cheapest way to get the job done. The tape output should be line level.

I would use an external audio interface that does 24-bit samples.

One of the things you will need to work on is setting he recording level. You want it as high as yu can get it but without clipping. One of the advantages of transfers over live recording is you can watch the level and if it clips, start over
 

Giuanniello

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 21, 2012
397
125
Capri - Italy
Hello everybody, trying and resurrect this thread.

I listen to vinyl once in a very while since I don't have a fixed spot for my turntable (which is huge whilst my apartment is quite small), I move it onto a desk in front of the stereo system, listen to a few records and back (not to mention running all of those cables to the router, TV etc etc the signal cables from the TurnTable become like antennas).

I have a couple LPs I want to rip, found in a drawer an old Griffin iMic USB interface so I thought I might take the Tape Record output from the preamp and either plug it straight into a MacBookAir's mic interface or through the iMic and then give the signal to some kind of software (which I don't have yet) to start the ripping process.

Which solution you think works best provided I don't want to add any more hardware to what I already have?

Which software would best work for the ripping process, is Audacity what I need?

Grazie
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,612
424
Redondo Beach, California
Which software would best work for the ripping process, is Audacity what I need?

Audacity would work but I bet you already have GarageBand. It is designed fr recording

If the Mac has an audio input use that in preference to the iMic. ANy audio interface has to be better than an iMic.

You would get better results if you used a better quality audio interface but something better than what you have starts at about $150.

Yes, do use the preamp's tape out put. recording straight off the turntable will not work. You need the preamp's "Phono" input to apply the RIAA curve. There does exist software for applying RIAA ad if you had it you could bypass the preamp. But this is not worth the effort unless you are using some very high end equipment and ==have new vinyl.

The preamp to the mac and then tell GB it is a vocal track and just record it. You need to set the levels but GB has a meter to help get that right
 

Giuanniello

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 21, 2012
397
125
Capri - Italy
As a preamp I use an Audio Research SP9, it got a Phono input of course, I just want to rip some vinyl with the equipment I own, not worth buying hardware for such a thing, should I one day wish to rip more I'd eventually evaluate some hardware but it is not the case now
 

Kaspin

macrumors member
Jan 15, 2015
77
33
You need an audio interface of some sort. If the griffin iMic isn't working out, I'd recommend the Behringer UCA202 (or UCA222). They're reasonably inexpensive.
 

Giuanniello

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 21, 2012
397
125
Capri - Italy
The iMic does work, it was in a drawer since ages, just figuring out if it adds some advantage to the mic input of a MacBookAir or Pro
 

mikzn

macrumors 68000
Sep 2, 2013
1,689
949
Vancouver
an audio interface would be the best for quality of the recording like the above mentioned Behringer or Focusrite for a .flac high quality recording

another quick and simple way would be to use the headphone output of the amp to the mic input of your mac and use voice memo's to record, you would have to adjust the volume to a level that does not clip or distort but it would a quick and easy way to record and play them. not saying it would be the best quality but easy to do.

if you like the recording you can drag it from voice memos to your desktop and it will create a .4ma audio file that will play in iTunes, then you can edit the Tags and info about the songs
 

Voenix Rising

macrumors member
May 1, 2013
77
40
You need an audio interface of some sort. If the griffin iMic isn't working out, I'd recommend the Behringer UCA202 (or UCA222). They're reasonably inexpensive.
iMic isn't avaiable anywhere any more (even tried eBay). I got a Behringer UCA202 and could never get it to power on through its USB connection as advertised. I'm trying to connect it to a 2016 MBP using a USB-A to USB-C adapter. No power that way, and no power if I plug it directly into a powered USB-A dock. Returned it for a refund. Hoping this is a one-off problem. I'll order another once the company refunds me.

When the Behringer is plugged in (and you have an LED light up top), do you magically see another input source available when you open the Sound preference pane?

It seems that in years past (ca. 2012 or so) there was a native "Line In" source that automatically showed up in the OS. That's been absent for quite some time, and I honestly don't know if it is hardware or software related because it was there on my old 2009 MBP running Snow Leopard and Lion, but when I went to replace that machine in 2013 it was gone.
 

theluggage

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2011
4,374
3,099
do you magically see another input source available when you open the Sound preference pane?
Basically, for any USB audio interface, yes.

It seems that in years past (ca. 2012 or so) there was a native "Line In" source that automatically showed up in the OS.
pre-2012 MacBook Pros had a physically separate 3.5mm jack for line in. RIP. It shows up in Sierra on my old 2011 MBP. These days, the headphone jack is a multi-connector affair that can also take a microphone - if you plug in a headset with a mic (or use an appropriate mic adapter) it overrides the internal mic and the "Internal Microphone" option in setup morphs into "External microphone".
 

MarkC426

macrumors 6502a
May 14, 2008
847
229
UK
I use garageband all the time for recording vinyl on my macpro.
I have my analog turntable connected to a mixer which has audio output into my macs line-in.