Warranty differences between countries?

betman

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 15, 2013
261
4
I recently learned that local law in some countries can force Apply to offer longer coverage than usual. Australia is one of those countries where consumer law will give you an additional year of coverage, so 2 years in total.

For those taking up Apple Care it won't make a difference. But for those who rely on the basic coverage it can be a huge difference.

Are there any other countries where you get extra coverage that exceeds the basic 1yr that Apple usually provides?
 

betman

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 15, 2013
261
4
Thanks.

What about other countries? Are there any others like Australia where you get the 2 years as standard without buying additional coverage?

Personally I travel quite a bit so if I can double the warranty time just by buying an Apple product elsewhere then I'll gladly go for it.
 

bgpaglia

macrumors newbie
Sep 20, 2012
11
5
Thanks.

What about other countries? Are there any others like Australia where you get the 2 years as standard without buying additional coverage?

Personally I travel quite a bit so if I can double the warranty time just by buying an Apple product elsewhere then I'll gladly go for it.
In all the European Union (+Switzerland), the product must be covered for 2 years (formally 1st year from retailer, 2nd year from manufacturer, but in fact just the manufacturer for both years).

Apple was fined several times in different EU countries for not clearly disclose customers about the second year of legal coverage, just to try selling more AppleCare extensions, even if the two coverages are very different.
 

gnasher729

macrumors P6
Nov 25, 2005
17,123
4,146
Thanks.

What about other countries? Are there any others like Australia where you get the 2 years as standard without buying additional coverage?

Personally I travel quite a bit so if I can double the warranty time just by buying an Apple product elsewhere then I'll gladly go for it.
Usually it is not a warranty, but your statutory right as a consumer that the product you buy has a certain quality. Because it is not a warranty, it has nothing to do with Apple Inc., but with the store where you buy. So if you live in Florida and buy a Mac during a holiday in London, you don't have rights against Apple, but against some store in London. If your Mac breaks, you'd have to move it back to London first to claim your statutory rights, which may be a problem. (Apple's one year warranty is worldwide).

And the rules are different. In the UK and generally in the EU, if a problem appears later than six months after the purchase, it is up to you to prove that the fault was present when you purchased. (I read that Apple has an internal policy to fix things if their "genius" thinks that the fault was present when you purchased the item, even if he or she is sure you wouldn't be able to prove it).
[doublepost=1493910341][/doublepost]
In all the European Union (+Switzerland), the product must be covered for 2 years (formally 1st year from retailer, 2nd year from manufacturer, but in fact just the manufacturer for both years).
Where do you get that from? The manufacturer has no liability at all beyond their own warranty. If you think otherwise, post a link to a competent website.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ApfelKuchen

bgpaglia

macrumors newbie
Sep 20, 2012
11
5
Usually it is not a warranty, but your statutory right as a consumer that the product you buy has a certain quality. Because it is not a warranty, it has nothing to do with Apple Inc., but with the store where you buy. So if you live in Florida and buy a Mac during a holiday in London, you don't have rights against Apple, but against some store in London. If your Mac breaks, you'd have to move it back to London first to claim your statutory rights, which may be a problem. (Apple's one year warranty is worldwide).

And the rules are different. In the UK and generally in the EU, if a problem appears later than six months after the purchase, it is up to you to prove that the fault was present when you purchased. (I read that Apple has an internal policy to fix things if their "genius" thinks that the fault was present when you purchased the item, even if he or she is sure you wouldn't be able to prove it).
[doublepost=1493910341][/doublepost]
Where do you get that from? The manufacturer has no liability at all beyond their own warranty. If you think otherwise, post a link to a competent website.
I've made a mistake in my post, sorry. The european "legal" warranty if covered by trader for EU regulations
Always 2 years if the product is covered by an european warranty.
Some countries (like mine) have more strict rules about warranty (to protect consumer even more), look here (maybe with google translate)
https://www.ridble.com/garanzia-europa-o-italia/

This is a easy reading article that explains severals scenarios here in Europe
http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/consumers/shopping/guarantees-returns/faq/index_en.htm
 

ApfelKuchen

macrumors 68040
Aug 28, 2012
3,767
2,343
Between the coasts
Apple's warranty is consistent worldwide, as it needs to be to discourage just this kind of activity (well, not so much to target individual travelers as to prevent cross-border reselling).

As others have already noted, local laws may provide additional protections, but only within those nations' boundaries. If, say, a Brit on vacation shows up in a Miami Apple store, she won't be able to claim rights under British consumer law - only Apple's warranty is "portable."
 

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,694
2,123
The UK gives 5 years and 6 in England for product defects however the burden of proof is on the consumer.
 

betman

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 15, 2013
261
4
In the UK and generally in the EU, if a problem appears later than six months after the purchase, it is up to you to prove that the fault was present when you purchased.
That doesn't quite sound logical. I mean what if something just... stops working after 6 months? You can hardly see a fauly when everything works fine and then just stops. It's not like you can open it up to check periodically. :)

It's simple enough to check. Just go to:

https://www.apple.com/legal/warranty/

and select your product, model and region.
Sounds simple enough, but as usual Apple is just playing games in some regions just to sell Apple Care. Like in Australia you will get the full 2 years and yes - Apple will cough up replacements during that time. But it's harder to sell additional coverage (even though it isn't exactly identical) if people know that they already have their 2 years guaranteed.
 

weckart

macrumors 603
Nov 7, 2004
5,098
2,411
That doesn't quite sound logical. I mean what if something just... stops working after 6 months? You can hardly see a fauly when everything works fine and then just stops. It's not like you can open it up to check periodically. :).
You get an engineer's report at your expense, basically. If it is a sealed unit, the small claims court is likely to assume an inherent fault unless there is clear evidence otherwise.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.