Was there any positives to assimilating the Aboriginals of Canada/Native Americans?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by waloshin, Mar 18, 2013.

  1. waloshin, Mar 18, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013

    waloshin macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #1
    Was there any positives to assimilating the Aboriginals of Canada/Native Americans?

    I am thinking:

    Before European contact the Aboriginals did not have:

    - electricity
    - Running clean water
    - pots and pans
    - Stoves or other appliances
    - Even though they had their medicine women today they have access to Health Care
    - Technology - That helps find jobs in todays economy.
     
  2. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #2
    I haven't laughed at a forum post in quite some time. This made me lol.

    Waloshin,

    I think there are positives if the alternative was just to kill them all or something equally horrifying. But the Europeans really botched the whole process, from the North to South of the continent. It's really unfortunate in South America where the entire history of the Mayan, Incan, and Aztec civilizations was destroyed.
     
  3. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    And yet the Aboriginals were happy, peaceful, disease free, had their own governments, and were prosperous.

    In some aspects, European contact destroyed a lot of what the Native culture had. Somehow I wonder if your 'positives' were in fact negatives.

    BL.
     
  4. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #4
    That is true, but what about today. Would the Aboriginals want to go back to their old ways of living? Without all of the things I mentioned?
     
  5. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    It doesn't matter about today. What happened back then was the catalyst, which cascades down to everything that is happening today.

    But I'll bite. If they went back to that, and the Europeans never came over, a lot of their friends, relatives, and families would be alive today, and their culture would be prospering.

    BL.
     
  6. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6
    Not a good idea to snort one's coffee. Not a good idea, at all, at all. Believe me, I feel your pain. Coffee should be sipped, savoured, and certainly neither snorted nor inhaled.....

    OP: there is a beautiful, bittersweet, book, which was written by a woman named Margaret Craven, which treats of this topic, with a rare, elegiac, empathy. The title of the book is "I Heard The Owl call My Name" and I strongly recommend that you read it.
     
  7. davidinva macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    Have to start somewhere (and I am not an expert, and others will jump in here):

    running clean water? yes they did, before it got polluted

    pots and pans? ever see pottery? wooden utensils?

    stoves? cooking over an open fire works well (bbq season is almost here)

    health care? a shaman (yes, man) was highly trained in using natural medicines

    jobs? Each person in a family and tribe had responsibilities and they took care of each other
     
  8. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #8
    Yes I realize that there are many intergenerational effects today, but there has to be some positives.

    ----------

    I guess the question should be more of: What are some positives of assimilation in contemporary Canada?
     
  9. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #9
    I'm not convinced they've been entirely "assimilated." In the U.S., the tribes still govern themselves, have their own healthcare system, and in quite a few respects maintain their own culture and way of life.

    I might point out that immediately after "European" contact, there still was no running water, electricity, etc. The White Man™ didn't have those things, either - but then, that's technology, not really what I would consider to fall under "assimilation."
     
  10. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #10
    Maybe development and assimilation? I would assume without European contact there would not be this technology.
     
  11. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Probably as much as anybody else would.
     
  12. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #12

    Wait a minute.. let's answer this with a question, and turn the tables around. Are you assuming that European cultures are superior to Native American Cultures?

    If so, you are vastly mistaken.

    BL.
     
  13. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #13
    I do not believe European culture is superior. Just some aspects are superior while some aspects of Native American cultures are superior.

    Such as better governments, and equality were way better for Native Americans.
     
  14. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #14
    Umm... At the time of contact, Europeans didn't have most of those things either.
     
  15. mcrain macrumors 68000

    mcrain

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    #15
    Assume for 1 second that the "assimilation" or as I like to call it, conquering and near destruction of a peoples, never happened. Do you honestly believe that for new technology to be adopted, there must be some destruction of the culture that adopts it?

    White people didn't nearly wipe out the Chinese, the Koreans, or the Japanese, yet those people make and have adopted technology like cars, tvs, electronics, cooking devices, and other things that you seem to believe the indiginous population in the US and Canada would be too "backwards" to adopt.
     
  16. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #16
    How does that even matter?
     
  17. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #17
    I don't know how its going down in the US but native cultures up here are known for quite a few things that I wouldn't exactly think of as positives. Adaptability is probably the lowest out of any culture I can think of.
     
  18. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #18
    Polar Bear defense technologies and Kraft Dinners.
     
  19. Don't panic macrumors 603

    Don't panic

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    #19
    and "after Europeans" they were mostly dead, while the few survivors where typically disenfranchised, displaced and impoverished

    you don't know if they were happy or not, but they most certainly were not peaceful, disease-free and prosperous.

    do not make the mistake of thinking that those were utopian times where honey and milk was running through the land. it was a rough, violent and overall unhappy life for most people, with high mortality and famine behind every corner
     
  20. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    Not at all.

    But the moment Cortez, Pizarro, and the other conquistadors step foot in this hemisphere and conquered the natives already here, the diseases they brought with them decimated the rest of the natives they had not already conquered. They had no immunities against that.

    I'm not saying tat famine, hunger, and disease were totally non-existent before Europeans walked off the boat, but there sure was a hell of a lot less of it before they walked off the boat.

    BL.
     
  21. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #21
    I remember reading that smallpox and other European diseases had already decimated a massive amount of the native population a good while before the American colonization push began in earnest. What the settlers faced when they came over here after the fact wasn't so much a massive Indian nation, as much as it was the wasteland of a plague aftermath.
     
  22. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    True, for when the colonization push started. But those diseases were brought to this land some 200 years before true colonization started. Conquistadors vs. Mayflower/Hudson Bay Company, for example.

    BL.
     
  23. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #23
    What said is that this is rarely even brought up in history books when talking about the plague. For that matter its effects on Asia, from where it of course originated, seem to get glossed over as well. Westerners seem to only care about dead Europeans.
     
  24. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #24
    So we should care more about the history of other cultures?
     
  25. APlotdevice, Mar 21, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013

    APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    We should try to care at least a little bit. Especially for those people who lived on the same land we do now. People who on occasion helped the early colonists, and whose native tongues carry on in the names of many cities and geographical features throughout North and South America.
     

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