weeding out candidates

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Sydde, Apr 17, 2015.

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How would you vote, WRT marijuana

  1. I am adamantly opposed to legalization and would never vote for someone who favors it

    4 vote(s)
    10.5%
  2. Other issues are more important to me

    9 vote(s)
    23.7%
  3. I favor legalization and would not support more prohibition

    21 vote(s)
    55.3%
  4. Cake? Where? Where is it? I WANT CAKE!

    4 vote(s)
    10.5%
  1. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #1
    Mr. Christie tells us that as President, he will use DoJ to bring those rogue states that have legalized marijuana into line. Because, drugs, I guess (he speaks of addiction, which is not really very applicable).

    Mr. Paul is co-sponsoring a bill that would legalized medical marijuana nationwide, which is a toenail shy of legalizing recreational use.

    So what do you think? Is the war on drugs a colossal failure that should be reconsidered? Or are we just not trying hard enough?

    More importantly, would it affect how you might vote, other things being equal?
     
  2. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #2
    Yes, and I'd vote for any candidate who agrees that it is a colossal failure.
     
  3. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

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    #3
    It's anonymous, but I'm +1 in the: I favor legalization and would not support more prohibition column :)
     
  4. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #4
    Single issue voter?
     
  5. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #5
    Not necessarily, but any politician who agrees with me on the Drug War probably agrees with me on other things, such as prison sentencing reform.
     
  6. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #6
    What kind of reform?
    Personally if you paid your debt to society then your slate should be wiped clean depending on the crime commited
     
  7. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #7
    Doing away with mandatory minimums, jail time for small-time non violent offenses, that sort of thing. No reason the United States should account for 25% of the world's prison population.

    This is a cross-partisan issue, too.
     
  8. Sydde thread starter macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #8
    Oh, maybe, for starters, clearing the greybar hotels of all those users who really should not be taking up that bedspace.
     
  9. A.Goldberg, Apr 17, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015

    A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

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    Boston
    #9
    1. I support decriminalization and legalization for appropriate and limited medical use.
    2. I do not support fully legal, recreational marijuana.
    3. I don't think your survey questions offered a fair selection of choices ;)

    I work in psychiatry and deal a lot with addiction, including alcoholism and marijauna addiction (yes, it's a real thing). I don't support the complete legalization of marijuana because I do believe it has the potential of making people (especially young people) think that if Alcohol was illegal, then made legal, and Pot was illegal, and now it's legal, then drug X should be ok to use. Essentially the governments laws on drugs being undermined as unimportant when in fact many drug laws are for your own protection.

    Marijuana isn't the worst of drugs but it does have some problems. I'd preferably like to see users taking it via a route of administration that does not involve smoking. It's clearly shown that it can decrease cognitive function. Students, the group most likely to use the most, have the potential to cause some real problems here as in many students, academic performance declines. Additionally, it has the potential of triggering psychiatric disorders in cases where it may not would have happened otherwise. For patients with psychiatric disorders, it can cause serious treatment issues.

    It has its uses in medicine, though some uses are far overstated IMO. Additionally, most sick people receiving regular medicine do not actually want to feel high taking medicine, especially for chronic conditions. People argue pot is "natural", which it is but so is morphine. I don't buy any of the natural vs synthetic debate when it comes to medication since your body doesn't know the difference.

    My hope is that through further marijuana research, new medicine can be designed that can amplify the therapeutic effects of marijuana without the unwanted/unnecessary side effects.

    Often times people argue "Alcohol is bad" and cite DUI's, alcoholism, violence, etc. I agree. My response is just because one thing is "bad" and legal doesn't mean you should make more "bad" things legal. My other thought is that people can drink alcohol and not get drunk while Marijuana, for the most part you just get high (to varying effects depending on the type, but regardless, the user is inebriated). Similarly, while cigarettes are terrible for your health, they do not create the inebriation. I also don't like the (what I perceive as) "everyone does it anyways" argument to make it legal. Everybody speeds, but that doesn't mean driving 90mph in a 65 should be legal.

    I'm not one to drop everything and devote my life to stopping the legalization. I don't think it's a good idea, but it's not the main focus of my political decision. I suspect Marijauna will become increasingly legal due to the popularity of the movement and the political power available for politicians who support it.

    My personal and medical decision is that it should not be legalized. I think politics is getting in the way of what is actually best for the physical, mental, and spiritual health of society. I do think decriminalization should be enacted nationwide for small amounts of pot. Like I said, it's not the most dangerous of drugs (but it can be for some, very dangerous in fact). It's not worth spending mountains of money on fighting a never ending battle and ruining someone's life over.

    I suspect widespread legalization will occur, but I just hope people on their own will assess the dangers of long term (and even short term) usage and make the decision how they want to live their lives. As stated before, I just plead ingestion via smoking is discouraged and that safer modes such a oral will be encouraged.
     
  10. FreemanW macrumors 6502

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    The Real Northern California
    #10
    Where's the Taco option?

    I support legalization and there are issues FAR more important.

    First and foremost, a sanity screening needs to be put in place for anyone contemplating politics.

    Too many certifiable, card-carrying, sociopathic, psychopathic, lunatics looking to win public office.
     
  11. xmichaelp macrumors 68000

    xmichaelp

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  12. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #12
    I don't like cake, but now you have me wondering where it is :confused:
     
  13. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    Location:
    UK
    #13
    Yeah I agree. Fraud and child abuse would probably be the major exceptions for me.
     
  14. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    Midlife, Midwest
    #14
    This is one example of where the cure (i.e.. the "War on Drugs") is worse than the disease: occasional marijuana use by a smallish segment of society.

    I think the reality is that a very large percentage of adult Americans today, under the age of ~70, probably have tried marijuana at least once in their lives.

    I am quietly horrified at how much time and money we spend arresting and prosecuting people, often over relatively tiny amounts of the drug. And quite often the police officers doing this have themselves had at least some personal use. From a larger, personal privacy perspective, I'm disgusted at the way in which law enforcement uses the "war on drugs" to conduct warrantless searches; to seize personal property; and - as you say - to ruin people's lives for possession and sale of relatively tiny amounts of a not-very-dangerous recreational drug.

    But is there a viable "decriminalization" route? Can we tolerate a certain amount of quasi-legalized marijuana without it becoming "big business" for either multinational corporations or - worse - criminal gangs?

    Colorado and a few other states are trying an experiment with semi-legalization. I guess we'll see how things turn out.
     
  15. mudslag macrumors regular

    mudslag

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    #15


    Just wondering what you mean by semi-legalization?
     
  16. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #16
    Big Pharma fears marijuana legalization. They--and the medical profession that is 100% complicit--are making billions keeping Americans hooked on Oxycontin, Ritalin, Vicodin, and a veritable cornucopia of other pharmaceuticals.
     
  17. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #17
    The OP started with the premise of all "other things being equal".

    This leads to a single issue answer.

    ----------

    I disagree.

    The slate should always record the laws that one breaks.
     
  18. chown33 macrumors 604

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    Aug 9, 2009
    #18
    It was left out in the rain.

    And we'll never have that recipe again.
     
  19. Sydde thread starter macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #19
    See, one of the problems with any kind of prohibition is just this: the illegal thing, if people find it desirable, becomes a black-market revenue stream for criminal gangs and cosas nostra. Make the stuff legal and people stop using underworld sources, cutting off part of their income. I suspect the mob really hates the idea of legalization, and the mob has a lot of money to fight it – who knows, they might even have some really big politicians in their pockets.
     
  20. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #20
    Something like this happened to me with an enchilada recipe I once had. I have yet to come to terms with the loss.
     
  21. vrDrew, Apr 18, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015

    vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #21
    And that's the concern I have over the Colorado experiment. (Maybe there is some info I'm not aware of..)

    But how do you handle the supply end of things in Colorado? You can't import the stuff. You can't take it across state lines. And I'm assuming you can't build a huge indoor grow-light operation. Without breaking the law. (Update: I see Colorado has licensed marijuana growers. So Colorado pot is Colorado grown. Score another win for US agribusiness....) But Colorado growers are still (potentially) liable to Federal prosecution. Which has pretty draconian punishments: think 10 years in Federal prison and a million dollar fine.

    Banks and credit card companies won't deal with marijuana retailers. So employees and vendors have to be paid in cash. So do all consumer sales. Meaning you have a lot of cash sitting around. Meaning you need to have "muscle" on hand to stop getting ripped off.

    Maybe there are acceptable work-arounds. But the sort of soft-legalization in places like Colorado still seems rife with opportunities from criminals to get their hooks into the business.
     
  22. Sydde thread starter macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #22
    The current DoJ has left enforcement up to the state: the Feds are not coming in to bust growers, retailers and users, at least until someone like Christie takes over. Of course, in places like Mesa Verde, Great Sand Dunes, RMNP and large swaths of national forests and grasslands, federal law still holds, so users needs to be careful in those areas.
     
  23. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #23
    He'll just ask them for protection money.
     
  24. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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  25. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #25
    I remain either among the undecided or the unconvinced. (okay, I have issues about taking a stand.)
     

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