Well, that's the end of iPhoto for me, thank goodness.

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Lodesman, Aug 10, 2014.

  1. Lodesman macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #1
    After struggling with iPhoto for 8 months (since moving to the Mac) I have finally managed to transfer all my photos (25,000) to a simple nested folder structure in Finder.

    There, they are not only easy to find, but are automatically laid out in the folder/date/subject chronological format I was used to pre-Mac.

    I have deleted all my events in iPhoto (I did keep two pictures in the iPhoto Library just to keep iPhoto happy), unchecked "copy photos to iPhoto library" and removed iPhoto from the Dock. Hopefully, I will have nothing more to do with iPhoto.

    iPhoto can now join the list of other useless apps (iWork for instance) lurking in the depths of my computer.

    I regret the hours and hours I have spent trying to make these Apps do what I want of them, to no avail.

    iWork was an excellent App IF you operated in an exclusively Apple world, saving as Word/Excel files caused loss of formatting and proved too much hassle. I now use Office for Mac and it is an excellent program, doing exactly what I want of it.

    iPhoto took over my photos when I transferred from my PC to Mac and filed them enthusiastically all over the place (within the library) with multiple copies proliferating, doubling the disc space used. When importing new photos and copying them to a new album, several hundred unwanted pictures would appear as well, requiring me to have a lengthy delete session each time.

    Now I can use a simple image viewer when I need to look at my photos.

    Guess what, I think I am finally starting to enjoy using my Mac (up until now the only benefit I have seen has been the fact that my desk is tidier and the unit looks great). There was a time a couple of months ago that I was ready to bin the Mac and go back to my old PC.

    I am still brassed off that I cannot update my car sat-nav or my Panasonic Lumix camera on the Mac but I do have my old PC for these tasks (and also to view the movies I have taken over the last ten years that the Mac refused to accept).

    When this Mac needs replacing, will I go for a Mac or a PC, what do you think?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    Nov 28, 2010
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    located
    #2
    I cannot help you with your decision to go Windows or stay on Mac OS X, but those videos you cannot play back on Mac OS X, did you try VLC Player for those? If yes, and it didn't work, can, if you want to, provide more information about those videos (format, codec, size, ...)?

    As for iPhoto, I never used it for more than showing others where a setting is buried.
    I prefer Lightroom, but then again, I shoot in RAW and also use PS to manipulate some of my photographs.
    Therefore I have a manual structure:

     
  3. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #3
    Thanks for your prompt response, I'll have a look at the unplayable (Mac) video formats later.

    Hopefully, after what this setup cost me, I won't have to think about replacing the Mac for a few years, and, you never know, I may may have come to like it by then.
     
  4. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

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    #4
    As said. Perhaps a more powerful app such as Aperture might work. I have macs and and what used to be a Dell Optiplex. Runs Windows and two Linux variants.

    I'd be loath to give up OSX though, but it's your call.
     
  5. JAT macrumors 603

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    #5
    Aperture was just EOLed last month. Might be a poor suggestion at this point.
     
  6. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #6
    Thanks for that in JAT, much appreciated, as are all the suggestions I receive here.
     
  7. robgendreau macrumors 68040

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    Jul 13, 2008
    #7
    Yeah, don't bother with Aperture.

    But if you want more effective tools than iPhoto (which is outdated, probably why Apple is also ditching it) you could try any of several other photo organizers. Many have built in photo editing tools as well. And many are multi-platform, so that if you move to a PC you'll be able to use their tools without interruption. Lightroom, for example, works on both PCs and Macs, and their license allows use on one Mac and one PC. Not sure about Capture One, or some of the others.
     
  8. tjwilliams25 macrumors 6502

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    #8
    I agree with both the Lightroom and VLC suggestions. Lightroom has gone lightyears ahead of anything else on the market for the price, and the fact that now when you buy it, it doesn't go out of new feature updates in 6 months, resulting in you not having to buy a new, rather expensive, product every year. Also, if you're having video troubles on the Mac, VLC will be your savior. It's free, constantly updated, and works with every file format on the planet. Plus, they've updated it not too long ago to have a more Mac-friendly appearance.

    As for your question on whether or not a Mac purchase in the future would be wise, I'll tell you this: give it time. Migrating from Windows to a Mac can be daunting for someone who is used to Microsoft's layout an language. All it takes is getting in there and realizing that the differences aren't so unmanageable, you just have to get used to the different way of thinking of doing something in OS X. Once you get used to it, I'm sure you'll never want a PC again! Especially since my 7-year-old iMac is still running strong, albeit a tad slower with strenuous tasks.
     
  9. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #9
    Thanks for the encouragement everyone, I'll press on with the iMac.
     
  10. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #10
    After deleting all my pictures from iPhoto and deleting them from iPhoto trash I have just checked and found that the iPhoto Library still has 6.3gb in it.

    Any idea what could still be there?
     
  11. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #11
    Sorted the problem - deleted the iPhoto Library and made a new one when iPhoto opened again.

    Now I can remove it from my Dock and forget about the program/app.
     
  12. tjwilliams25 macrumors 6502

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    #12
    Glad you could get it sorted out! The only thing I can surmise is that it may have had duplicates/originals still left in the Library collection in your picture folder. Sometimes it won't show them in iPhoto. I, too, have had this issue, and since it's archiving hierarchy is vastly different than any other preinstalled Apple programs, I've also given it up. Hopefully you can find an app that meets your needs.
     
  13. firedept macrumors 603

    firedept

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    #13
    Yep, you either love or hate iPhoto. I am of the latter. Have never used it and have never trusted it to work the way I want it to work. But I think I am of the minority. Most people seem to like iPhoto. I could never wrap my head around it.

    I use Adobe Bridge for tagging and my own filing system which I am much more comfortable with. Works for me and that is what counts I guess.
     
  14. Partron22 macrumors 68000

    Partron22

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    #14
    Proprietary file storage formats

    And in 20 years, you'll be able to access your old photos, provided you can find the proper adapter to hook up your massively outdated storage device.
    I wonder if Apple still makes anything that'll open MacWrite or MacDraw documents? Fortunately I converted all the really important ones ages ago.
     
  15. nostresshere macrumors 68030

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    Dec 30, 2010
    #15
    I hate it. I have used it some because other programs use it for photos.

    I keep trying, but it seems so illogical.
     
  16. Merode macrumors 6502

    Merode

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    #16
    iPhoto is flawed and there's space for a lot of improvement. But overall, it's still better than keeping pictures in folders.

    With some work, it could be brilliant, but I guess it's easier for Apple to write new app from ground up - Photos. I just hope they make it easy and painless to migrate your existing iPhoto library when it comes.
     
  17. Fishrrman macrumors G4

    Fishrrman

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    #17
    OP wrote above:
    [[ There, they are not only easy to find, but are automatically laid out in the folder/date/subject chronological format I was used to pre-Mac. ]]

    You could use Aperture, which works differently from iPhoto (if you set it up to work that way).
    Aperture will "leave your pics where you want them", yet will still assemble its own library and offer you quite an array of adjustments and controls. This is because Aperture only saves small data files (which will be used to "adjust" the display of the pics as you set them in Aperture), and leaves the originals untouched in your nested folders. Again, you have to choose to set it to run this way.

    NOTE: DISREGARD the above posts that tell you that Aperture is end-of-lifed. The existing app will run into the near future, and it looks like much of it is going to end up incorporated in Apple's upcoming "Photos" app (though at this time, it's not known if Photos will retain the "nested folder option" that Aperture does). We'll just have to wait and see.

    Hasselblad's free "Phocus" app will also leave your pics in the nested folders.

    As will Picasa, as well.

    And if you don't wish to join Adobe's Creative Cloud, you can still get Photoshop Elements for a decent price.
     
  18. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #18
    Thanks Fishrrman, much appreciated as are all the constructive comments recently posted.

    It's good to know I am not the only one who finds iPhoto illogical. When I broached the subject a few months ago I was inundated with responses from iPhoto devotees inferring that I was not getting it and I should try harder.

    Comments like "nested folders are outdated and everyone is moving to SQL databases" (whatever they are) did not help me address my needs.

    All well meaning (I think) if a bit impenetrable.

    My Mac is a tool I use to facilitate my life - I have little interest in how/why it works only that it performs the tasks I ask of it.

    I am now perfectly happy with my antiquated nested folders and using an image viewer when necessary (after all, how often do I look at the 50 photos taken on a holiday in the Vendee in 2000 or the 275 photos taken on a visit to Las Vegas in 2002).

    I would not dream of criticising those who see the Mac as a hobby in itself, after all "If it turns you on then it does you good".

    Once agan, thanks everyone.
     
  19. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #19
    I can't imagine 25k photos, at least raw images, in a single iPhoto/Aperture managed library. IPhoto and Aperture give you the choice to go managed or referenced. And if you want tp intentionally to go managed, you can do a separate library per year, per customer, or other sorting mechanism. Not all the eggs in one large database package basket.

    I have around 110K photos in my single Lightroom library that are referenced as LR only does referenced libraries. Only the catalog files on on my rMBP SSD, the originals are in an external library drive using over 1TB of space. My referenced library folders are by year/day. That works well for me but may not for you.

    It will be interesting to see if the new Photos also does both referenced and managed storage if you elect to not try to put large photo libraries in their cloud storage.
     
  20. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #20
    Hi MCAsan, without meaning any disrespect, your posting illustrates the gulf that exists in knowledge between you and me. You being all-knowing and me being the dunce.

    Even after reading http://support.apple.com/kb/PH7625 I still have no idea of the difference between a referenced and a managed library or the point of either.

    I still cannot grasp why any of the terms are relevant when I can use a simple image viewer to see all my 55gb of photos. I know where they all are as they are filed by General Subject (Family, Friends, House, Boat, Aircraft etc.) and then filed by date prefix and subject (200807 Graduation etc.).

    Easy.
     
  21. robgendreau macrumors 68040

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    #21
    Lodesman, glad you know where everything is.

    For those of us with worse memories, things like captions, keywords, dates, and other criteria are important. And it saves us from the problem you might have, like "does this 'friend and brother in a boat' picture go into Friends, Family or Boat folder?" ;) Quandries like that are what drove so many of the rest of us into using photo managment software of whatever type.
     
  22. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #22

    Wizard of Oz: Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain. ;)

    Seriously, you can find out lots about Aperture library options with a few good internet searches. No one is born, at least outside Cupertino, knowing all there is to know about Aperture.


    Try these sites:
    https://www.video2brain.com/en/lessons/managed-vs-referenced-file-storage
    http://support.apple.com/kb/PH7625
    http://www.lifeafterphotoshop.com/managed-vs-referenced-files-in-aperture/
     
  23. Lodesman thread starter macrumors regular

    Lodesman

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    #23
    Thanks for the simple explanation - very helpful.

    I now realise that WHEN I have a problem knowing where things are, then I'll start thinking about these different libraries.
     
  24. dwfaust macrumors 68040

    dwfaust

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    #24
    This is an interesting thread. I am only using iPhoto for the PhotoStream option with iOS to sync iPhone/iPad photos with my rMBP.

    I had an issue with my rMBP very early on that almost caused me to lose > 10,000 photos. I made the decision at that time not to rely on iPhoto.

    All of my photos are stored on a NAS (Drobo 5N with dual redundancy), organized by date (yyyy-mm-dd Description).

    I was never a big fan of the inability to directly access my photos stored within iPhoto from photo editing apps. I much prefer the external solution, and having everything stored in a structured order makes finding a particular photo pretty simple and straight forward.
     
  25. robgendreau, Aug 15, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014

    robgendreau macrumors 68040

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    #25
    I sort of had the same experience. I relied upon iPhoto, then Aperture, because a mess of applications let me choose photos from them even when they weren't open. But then I started using applications that did NOT access iPhoto or Aperture libraries, and had to use the Finder. Yuck.

    No matter what organization with folders I tried I ran into problems. The basic deficiency of a Finder folder system is that you cannot have a file in more than one folder. And that's true for not only images.

    And that's why there are so many database/library/catalog type info managers out there. Photos can be in more than one album, songs or video in more than one playlist, etc etc. Meanwhile, in the Finder, you still have that original folder structure, untouched. So you get the benefit of BOTH systems with little to no downside.

    But there's another way, and that's tagging and keywording. Keywords are actually embedded in photo files, so they go wherever the file goes. You already have a bunch of metadata there whether you like it or not, unless you manually removed it, like camera type, aperture, etc. You can add keywords or caption, or location info. Then just use Spotlight to find it. Some software, like LR, can even do hierarchical keywords, which behave just like hierarchical file folders, except without the one folder per file limit.

    Most people here seem to be the only users of the photos. If you wind up having to share photos, you need a system more comprehensible to others. Since photos have not only more than one subject in most cases, as well as types (portrait, landscape, etc), and metadata (location, camera, copyright, etc), folders end up not cutting it.

    I learned a lot about organization from sports and news photographers, although I'm not either. They have to work fast, take bazillions of shots, and have to document everything. Nobody here probably has such high demands, but what they've learned can benefit most of us. All that IPTC stuff you see in your files was generated to fit there needs, but it can work for you as well. And you can see some of that influence in the difference between say Photo Mechanic and Aperture.
     

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