What’s on your mind?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Gutwrench, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1401
    I have been struck by this as well.

    That is because very often they are not designed by people who have to use them.

    Moreover, that sort of design is not considered fashionable, or deemed worth devoting time, thinking, energy, effort, and resources into - and may be viewed with considerable disdain (as is much in the domestic sphere) by designers.
     
  2. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #1402
    Modern cutlery comes to mind.
    Most are godawful bits of stamped stainless steel no balance, no weight, no slicing or cutting or scooping capabilities.
    The worst are the sets that come in little stands… with a bit of plastic on the handle. Akin to aeroplane cutlery.

    We only eat with antique cutlery. No that sounds all highfalutin, but actually nothing beats a flat spatula knife with a carbon steel blade you can sharpen, and large forks, spoons. And with a good weight, not difficult with silver.
    Often not much more expensive than the modern stuff.
     
  3. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1403
    Agreed, and very well said.

    My preferences lie along similar lines.

    For glassware, I use Waterford lead crystal, Lismore pattern, elegant, sturdy, and beautiful to use. And, as you say, not much more expensive than Riedel or other brands.

    I have seen "award winning" cutlery where the handle resembled a corkscrew and was, frankly, absolutely impossible to hold.

    Good design should be a fusion of form (it looks good) and function (it works well and does what it is supposed to do sufficiently well for it not to have to be commented upon).

    Much - if not most - modern design fails that test.

    And, as for balance in the hand; these days, I use Japanese knives when cooking - they are exquisite to look at, perfectly balanced in the hand, are not too heavy, and do the work of cutting, slicing, chopping, and cutting exceptionally well.
     
  4. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #1404
    What's on my mind?
    It is 4:15pm.
    Pleased to look out our windows and see that the sun has not yet set.

    I hate winter's darkness.
     
  5. decafjava macrumors 68030

    decafjava

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    #1405
    This, a thousand times this...
     
  6. Lioness~ macrumors 65816

    Lioness~

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    #1406
    I LOVE that part of the winter.
    Especially if the winter is mild as this year.
    The awareness of what new that have started to grow.
    It’s magical to me.
    The seeds that are getting roots and start its journey in care and nurturing of the winter 'darkness'.
    This winter have a special touch for me.
     
  7. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #1407
    Oh my goodness. No. :)

    I love Spring most of all.
    Light, green growth and returning warmth.

    But the dead of winter? No.
    Perhaps here in the UK we already suffer from a lack of clear skies, and winter darkness just exacerbates the gloomth.

    It was with a happy heart I did 108 Sun Salutation this (and many in the past) this Winter Solstice. :)
     
  8. kazmac macrumors 604

    kazmac

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    #1408
    Well, I chose to be born in the Winter instead of Spring (that’s impatience for you). :p So I prefer Winter.

    The only thing I dislike about winter is ice and slush. Fresh snow is awesome though.

    I am thinking about how I have been avoiding and rethinking stress lately. Very satisfied with the choices I’ve made so far.
     
  9. Apple fanboy macrumors Penryn

    Apple fanboy

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    #1409
    Glad to here it.


    A meeting I have tomorrow is very much in my mind. As is the subject of that meeting.
     
  10. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    #1410
    The products in question are everyday products used by millions. They're products the average person probably uses about 100x a year. I did finally get directed to a very accurate product I was looking up info on. I'm not pleased by the price, but if it means not dealing with useless tools, then so be it.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 10, 2019 ---
    I've always enjoyed knives that can cut a hair follicle at an angle and that angle be visible. Sharp enough to do that, yet not sharp enough to cut through harder objects. Though likely sharp enough to skin each layer of the dermis with some ease or difficulty.
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1411
    That is almost irrelevant; a great many daily products are atrociously poorly designed.

    People use them because they are used to them, or nothing else is readily available at that price point, or advertising, or inertia.

    I remember those horrid little stainless steel teapots available in hotels and restaurants in the 70s and early to mid 80s; they scalded you, never poured without spilling as the spouts were dreadfully designed, burned your hand if you tried to lift the teapot lid to remove a teabag; as an example of atrocious yet ubiquitous design they could not be equalled.
     
  12. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    #1412
    In the case of a medical device, not really.
     
  13. kazmac macrumors 604

    kazmac

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    #1413
    I am sure you’ll be fine in that meeting.
     
  14. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1414
    That depends.

    But a considerable number of everyday products are very poorly designed.
     
  15. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    #1415
    Oh for crying out loud. I saw some city trucks in the area and wondered what they were doing standing around. Bastards decided to trim trees and run a grinder for the next six hours. Posted notices on everyone's front door.
     
  16. Lioness~ macrumors 65816

    Lioness~

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    #1416
    I love all seasons these days.
    Sure, I enjoy when the weather are nice/nicer according to what season it is.
    But even rain is magic. Snow can be too. But the convenience without it is appreciated.
    But when the inside is happy, it’s easier to find the appreciation in seasons shifts, in my experience.

    When I biked home from a tough Ashtanga class this evening the rain was like getting a free shower of rain and oxygen.
    108 Sun Salutations, sounds like a good invitation for your inner sun :)
    I prefer some more variation of my yoga challenges. The balance.
    Not that I can’t imagine the challenge of all these Sun Salutation.
    ****, I might lose my temper to the burning sun ;)
    Or not, never tried. So can’t tell. But I like the rhythm, balance and healing of Ashtanga.
    So for now I stay with that.
     
  17. AngerDanger macrumors 68040

    AngerDanger

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    #1417
    The fact that there is now a thread in Current Events called Madonna's Butt implants. :rolleyes:

    How much longer my hair has gotten.
     
  18. chown33 macrumors 604

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    #1418
    It could have been called "Madonna's Synthetic Steatopygia". Then it would have been vocabulary building.
     
  19. decafjava macrumors 68030

    decafjava

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    #1419
    They still use those in hospitals and they were still annoying...
     
  20. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1420
    Sigh.

    I saw that and wondered whether some of these people have any sort of a life, that they must onside this a topic worthy of a thread.


    How depressing.

    More than annoying - these are an example of seriously poor design.
     
  21. arkitect, Jan 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019

    arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #1421
    Now you've touched on something close to my heart!

    Those little pressed steel teapots / coffee cans / milk jugs / sugar bowls are some of the nastiest designs ever. And they are alive and well in coffee shops and tea shops around the country.

    In fact last Wednesday at the Ashmolean in Oxford… guess what the tea was served in? Yup. Little pressed steel pots. (Strictly one "catering strength" tea bag) All stuck on a miserable rubberised tray that hadn't had a good wipe in a while.

    Genuinely "cheap and nasty".

    A decent teapot?
    1. Holds a fair quantity of liquid;
    2. Pours smoothly and with minimal dribbling.
    3. Looks good.

    So again, as with cutlery, I go for antique pots — with a long "swan neck" and a handle with insulation.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 11, 2019 ---
    Oh I only do it twice a year on the Solstice(s). The rest of the year is a mix of all types of Yoga. (Though I must confess through winter Yin is my favourite.)

    The 108 Surya Namaskar is a lovely thing — yes, physically (and mentally) a test — it is a great group of people we do it with. Each time I find my own pace and rhythm — even though the structure is as "rigid" as a metronome, there is an ebb and flow of energy.
    Afterwards we go for a drink — so not all virtuous. :)
     
  22. Zenithal macrumors 603

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  23. Gutwrench, Jan 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019

    Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #1423
    Madonna’s butt sounds like a social issue and the thread should be moved to PRSI. :rolleyes:
    --- Post Merged, Jan 11, 2019 ---
    How well a knife keeps its edge depends on the intended use, the blade quality, the user’s knife skills, and maintenance. Having used a knife professionally for five years any kitchen knife will cut skin with ease. However, the most dangerous knife will always be a dull one.

    Sharp enough to cut hair but not sharp enough to cut harder objects. ...cut skin with “ease or difficulty”. I don’t understand those?
     
  24. Apple fanboy macrumors Penryn

    Apple fanboy

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    #1424
    Surly you measure the sharpness of a blade by how easily it kills someone? That’s what me and the rest of the league of assassins do! :D

    My dad was a butcher for the best part of 40 years, so knew how to sharpen a knife well.
     
  25. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #1425
    I learned to sharpen a toothbrush while being a resident of luxurious Pelican Island.
     

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