What are some maintenance steps you can take to keep your MBPr running like new?


GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
What are some maintenance steps you can take to keep your MBPr running like new?
None. OS X will take care of itself, without the need for user interference. Unless you're experiencing a particular problem, just relax and use your Mac and let it take care of maintenance.
 

Hieveryone

macrumors 601
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
4,147
1,470
USA
None. OS X will take care of itself, without the need for user interference. Unless you're experiencing a particular problem, just relax and use your Mac and let it take care of maintenance.
Firefox got slow, then I deleted all the files and reinstalled it. Now it runs like new.

There are steps you can take
 

nobodyjustwalks

macrumors regular
Jan 23, 2013
211
0
I try not to install poorly written programs in the first place. I look at the highest rated reviews, and more importantly, the average to low ratings. I also do not install programs that mirror OSXʻs built in functionality. This is of course a personal preference as Iʻm sure many users prefer their aftermarket programs for various reasons. Just comes down your needs.

Lastly, Iʻve learned (as well as-Iʻm sure-almost all veteran Mac users) how to properly uninstall programs. Know how to clean your system caches and folders. Donʻt depend on useless utilities that end up deleting more than they should.
 

Hieveryone

macrumors 601
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
4,147
1,470
USA
I try not to install poorly written programs in the first place. I look at the highest rated reviews, and more importantly, the average to low ratings. I also do not install programs that mirror OSXʻs built in functionality. This is of course a personal preference as Iʻm sure many users prefer their aftermarket programs for various reasons. Just comes down your needs.

Lastly, Iʻve learned (as well as-Iʻm sure-almost all veteran Mac users) how to properly uninstall programs. Know how to clean your system caches and folders. Donʻt depend on useless utilities that end up deleting more than they should.
Firefox is pretty standard. I mean, you can't say it's poorly written. Anyway, how do I clean caches and properly delete files? I just followed this to delete it which is also the instructions in the firefox website:

1. Drag the Firefox application to the Trash.

2. Firefox also has a .plist file at ~/Library/Preferences/org.mozilla.firefox.plist you may wish to remove.

If you also wish to remove your Firefox user data and settings (bookmarks, extensions, etc.) trash the "Firefox" folder, located here: ~Library/Application Support/Firefox. [2] See Removing user profile data (below) for additional information.

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Uninstalling_Firefox
 

nobodyjustwalks

macrumors regular
Jan 23, 2013
211
0
Firefox is pretty standard. I mean, you can't say it's poorly written. Anyway, how do I clean caches and properly delete files? I just followed this to delete it which is also the instructions in the firefox website:

1. Drag the Firefox application to the Trash.

2. Firefox also has a .plist file at ~/Library/Preferences/org.mozilla.firefox.plist you may wish to remove.

If you also wish to remove your Firefox user data and settings (bookmarks, extensions, etc.) trash the "Firefox" folder, located here: ~Library/Application Support/Firefox. [2] See Removing user profile data (below) for additional information.

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Uninstalling_Firefox
Think you misunderstood. loll...I wasnʻt talking about Firefox, I think Firefox is a great browser. I was talking about software in general. Many new Mac users will buy a new Mac, go the app store, and download software that they donʻt need or that does stuff your system already does.

Run it lean and clean...thatʻs my advice. :)
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
Firefox got slow, then I deleted all the files and reinstalled it. Now it runs like new.

There are steps you can take
Those aren't maintenance steps. That's resolving a particular problem with a particular app, although your "solution" was likely overkill, rather than simply troubleshooting the issue.
 

Hieveryone

macrumors 601
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
4,147
1,470
USA
Think you misunderstood. loll...I wasnʻt talking about Firefox, I think Firefox is a great browser. I was talking about software in general. Many new Mac users will buy a new Mac, go the app store, and download software that they donʻt need or that does stuff your system already does.

Run it lean and clean...thatʻs my advice. :)

Exactly! I run it lean and clean. I don't download apps from the app store.

I don't keep any widgets.

The only extras I have are chrome, firefox, pages, notes, keynote, google earth, google drive, and turbo tax lol.

----------

Those aren't maintenance steps. That's resolving a particular problem with a particular app, although your "solution" was likely overkill, rather than simply troubleshooting the issue.
Troubleshoot didn't work. So I just completely deleted it and re-installed it. Now it's fast again. Although it still doesn't feel the same as before, but I'm thinking that's just in my head..
 

Freyqq

macrumors 601
Dec 13, 2004
4,014
166
Repair the permissions occasionally in disk utility. Keep an external backup. Wait until the 10.x.1 update before moving to a new OSX version.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
Repair the permissions occasionally in disk utility.
Some people repair, or recommend repairing permissions for situations where it isn't appropriate. Repairing permissions only addresses very specific issues. It is not a "cure all" or a general performance enhancer, and doesn't need to be done on a regular basis. It also doesn't address permissions problems with your files or 3rd party apps.
Disk Utility repairs the permissions for files installed by the Mac OS X Installer, Software Update, or an Apple software installer. It doesn’t repair permissions for your documents, your home folder, and third-party applications.

You can verify or repair permissions only on a disk with Mac OS X installed.
Does Disk Utility check permissions on all files?

Files that aren't installed as part of an Apple-originated installer package are not listed in a receipt and therefore are not checked. For example, if you install an application using a non-Apple installer application, or by copying it from a disk image, network volume, or other disk instead of installing it via Installer, a receipt file isn't created. This is expected. Some applications are designed to be installed in one of those ways.

Also, certain files whose permissions can be changed during normal usage without affecting their function are intentionally not checked.
There are times when repairing permissions is appropriate. To do so, here are the instructions:
If repairing permissions results in error messages, some of these messages can be ignored and should be no cause for concern.
 

cbautis2

macrumors 6502a
Aug 17, 2013
718
576
None! That's the beauty of OS X. Gone are the days of maintaining a pristine windows os.

On the hardware side, clean the heat sink with compressed air once per two weeks to prevent dust build up and slow your mac down
 

acctman

macrumors 65816
Oct 26, 2012
1,129
692
Georgia
it's a computer use it to it's fullest and when it dies or something better comes out, replace it.
 

leman

macrumors G3
Oct 14, 2008
9,965
4,550
Firefox is pretty standard. I mean, you can't say it's poorly written.
If it slows down with the time, then I'd say that its poorly written ;) But in general, I've been using Macs for a while and I never noticed any performance degradation. Very very rarely a buggy system process runs rogue, and that might force you to restart the machine, but thats pretty much it...
 

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,682
2,103
Nothing

If it slows down with the time, then I'd say that its poorly written ;) But in general, I've been using Macs for a while and I never noticed any performance degradation. Very very rarely a buggy system process runs rogue, and that might force you to restart the machine, but thats pretty much it...
Unless you download some third party nonsense then they pretty much look after themselves...
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
FruitJuice is a great app for maintaining your battery health
That app is useless. There is no need to "maintain" an Apple notebook battery or drain to a specific percentage on a specific schedule. Run on battery whenever you need to and plug it in whenever you can. You can plug or unplug any time you need to, regardless of the charged percentage, and you never need to completely drain your battery.
The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions, including tips for maximizing battery performance. If you haven’t already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.
 

dudeslife

macrumors member
Jul 25, 2011
96
26
That app is useless. There is no need to "maintain" an Apple notebook battery or drain to a specific percentage on a specific schedule. Run on battery whenever you need to and plug it in whenever you can. You can plug or unplug any time you need to, regardless of the charged percentage, and you never need to completely drain your battery.
The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions, including tips for maximizing battery performance. If you haven’t already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.
Actually, it is not useless. It follows Apple's battery recommendations and does the thinking for you. It is especially useful for people who mainly keep their notebook plugged in. I would go months without unplugging on my first battery. Fruitjuice works great as a reminder tool.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
It follows Apple's battery recommendations and does the thinking for you.
Apple doesn't recommend anything that Fruitjuice does.
It is especially useful for people who mainly keep their notebook plugged in. I would go months without unplugging on my first battery.
There's nothing wrong with leaving it plugged in. You and the app developers are operating on old information that does not apply to today's Apple notebook batteries. Apple makes no recommendation about how long to stay plugged in or how often to run on battery power. The app is useless.

From the developer's FAQ page:
If you read Apple’s About Notebook Batteries page, you will see that they recommend using your machine on battery power regularly. If your machine is plugged in most of the time, then Apple recommends that you charge and discharge your battery about once a month.
Apple makes no such recommendation.
A FruitJuice Maintenance Cycle consists of charging your battery to full and then discharging (i.e. running on battery) until the percent charge drops below 20%.
That is not a cycle. Read the WHAT IS A CYCLE? section of the Battery FAQ that I posted to learn what a real cycle is.
 

Hieveryone

macrumors 601
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
4,147
1,470
USA
Apple doesn't recommend anything that Fruitjuice does.

There's nothing wrong with leaving it plugged in. You and the app developers are operating on old information that does not apply to today's Apple notebook batteries. Apple makes no recommendation about how long to stay plugged in or how often to run on battery power. The app is useless.

From the developer's FAQ page:

Apple makes no such recommendation.

That is not a cycle. Read the WHAT IS A CYCLE? section of the Battery FAQ that I posted to learn what a real cycle is.
With a name like fruitjuice....I'll leave it there :D
 

dudeslife

macrumors member
Jul 25, 2011
96
26
From Apple's website:

Do not fully charge or fully discharge your device’s battery — charge it to around 50%. If you store a device when its battery is fully discharged, the battery could fall into a deep discharge state, which renders it incapable of holding a charge. Conversely, if you store it fully charged for an extended period of time, the battery may lose some capacity, leading to shorter battery life.

Does that not apply to leaving it plugged in all of the time. Fully charged?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
From Apple's website:

Do not fully charge or fully discharge your device’s battery — charge it to around 50%. If you store a device when its battery is fully discharged, the battery could fall into a deep discharge state, which renders it incapable of holding a charge. Conversely, if you store it fully charged for an extended period of time, the battery may lose some capacity, leading to shorter battery life.

Does that not apply to leaving it plugged in all of the time. Fully charged?
No, that applies to long-term storage of a battery or notebook.

Store it half-charged when you store it long term.

If you want to store your device long term, two key factors will affect the overall health of your battery: the environmental temperature and the percentage of charge on the battery when it’s powered down for storage. Therefore, we recommend the following:
  • Do not fully charge or fully discharge your device’s battery — charge it to around 50%. If you store a device when its battery is fully discharged, the battery could fall into a deep discharge state, which renders it incapable of holding a charge. Conversely, if you store it fully charged for an extended period of time, the battery may lose some capacity, leading to shorter battery life.
  • Power down the device to avoid additional battery use.
  • Place your device in a cool, moisture-free environment that’s less than 90° F (32° C).
  • If you plan to store your device for longer than six months, charge it to 50% every six months.
Depending on how long you store your device, it may be in a low-battery state when you remove it from long-term storage. After it’s removed from storage, it may require 20 minutes of charging with the original adapter before you can use it.
 

Hieveryone

macrumors 601
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
4,147
1,470
USA
From Apple's website:

Do not fully charge or fully discharge your device’s battery — charge it to around 50%. If you store a device when its battery is fully discharged, the battery could fall into a deep discharge state, which renders it incapable of holding a charge. Conversely, if you store it fully charged for an extended period of time, the battery may lose some capacity, leading to shorter battery life.

Does that not apply to leaving it plugged in all of the time. Fully charged?
If you really want to boost battery, turn off the psycedilic screen saver that comes stock. I love it, but it definitel drains my batery
 

dudeslife

macrumors member
Jul 25, 2011
96
26
No, that applies to long-term storage of a battery or notebook.
Well, Apple's official stance may be this but my first battery performance declined to about 2 hours after 3 years of use (mostly plugged in). Would you consider this normal and acceptable?