What are your strategies in conserving your macbook's battery?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by singjai, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. singjai macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    #1
    I bought my first macbook pro when the late 2013 retina model was released and am still learning about how to use the battery. The way I've been using it was keeping it plugged in at 100% all day when I'm home. Everyday I go to class, I take it off the charger and use it on it's own power. By the time I get home 4-5 hours later, it will be at around maybe 75-85% depending on how much I used it. By then, I'll have it plugged back in again until tomorrow. That's my daily routine with it. Is that a good routine in conserving the 12 hour battery life? What do you guys do?

    Also, I use the laptop for hours at a time while it's plugged in at 100%. That won't effect the battery negatively right?
     
  2. Wishbrah macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2013
    #2
    simple tips:

    -close unused programs
    -turn off keyboard light
    -use lowest brightness you can deal with
    -turn off bluetooth when not using
    -turn off wifi when not using

    i think you're already employing the most commonly held belief: charge when you can, where you can. don't worry about how much power is left in the battery before you charge it.
     
  3. MarvinHC macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Location:
    Shanghai, PRC
    #3
    I think the OPs question was more about how to ensure that the battery is keeping its capacity for a long time, not how to use the least energy.

    Here is what Apple says:
    http://www.apple.com/batteries/notebooks.html

    The essence is that it is best to not always keep it plugged in but also use the battery from time to time - exactly what the OP is doing. The battery should also be run down to (almost) empty on a regular basis.
     
  4. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #4
    I use it. If it works I keep using it. Once it stops working I'll take it in for service. I don't worry about my daily routine to optimize the battery on a computer that will be obsolete in a few years.
     
  5. MarvinHC macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Location:
    Shanghai, PRC
    #5
    --- slightly off topic ---

    Hi Alphaod, I see we are located in the same city. Somebody told me that it is almost impossible to get an appointment at the apple store in Shanghai for help or warranty work. What is your experience with that (I am just contemplating if it is worthwhile to buy the year 2 and 3 warranty extension)?
     
  6. alphaod, Jan 26, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2014

    alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #6
    It's very easy to set up an appointment. Just make an appointment online at www.apple.com/cn/retail/

    Yes, the stores are busy, so you'll need to set one up for a few days out. If you just show up, then no they won't put you in for service. A lot people just show up expecting service and then they get angry when they're asked to make an appointment online. I see this all the time; they think yelling and making a lot of noise is way to go (it's not—it gets you escorted out by security).

    My experience has always been good. I noticed [compared to the US] the Geniuses don't have as much leeway when it comes with being generous without out-of-warranty and uncovered repairs. Just don't expect anything extra. However for normal work they do reasonable job.

    For some work that would normally be instant (like exchanging a broken iPhone for a new one) in the US, they usually keep you device overnight for inspection. This is due to a lot of unscrupulous people who take all broken parts (dead motherboard, battery, screen, camera), into one phone and then try to get that phone replaced, so they can then get a bunch of all new working parts. So it's not convenient in that matter.

    As for the warranty extension do you mean AppleCare? Or some other extension? AppleCare doesn't get your special service if that's what you want, but it does cover repairs and such. Honestly for any Mac repair in China, I don't trust anyone but the Apple Store.

    (If you have other questions, PM me ;))
     
  7. MarvinHC macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Location:
    Shanghai, PRC
    #7
    Thanks, that is reassuring. Yes, I was referring to AppleCare. I didn't expect any special service but as said, some friend told me that it was almost impossible to get an appointment for any repair, warranty or not. Good to hear that this is not true. (I actually just tried out and would have even been able to get an appointment still tonight in the Pudong store).
     
  8. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #8
    Use it, the harder the better, full to empty(ish) on as regular a basis as you can.

    Worst thing you can do is leave it plugged into the charger all the time, even with the built-in exercising regime.
     
  9. Wishbrah macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2013
    #9
    Whoops. Thanks for clarifying. :rolleyes:
     
  10. disasterdrone macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2013
    #10
    I think that statement shows a distinct lack of imagination.
     
  11. thundersteele macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Location:
    Switzerland
    #11
    Dear OP, your use of the battery is perfectly fine, no need to change anything.
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #12
    What you're doing is perfectly fine. Run on battery whenever you need to and plug it in whenever you can. You can plug or unplug any time you need to, regardless of the charged percentage, and you never need to completely drain your battery. Just make sure you don't run on AC power exclusively, as your battery needs to be used regularly to stay healthy.

    There are many factors that impact your battery life. See the BATTERY LIFE FROM A CHARGE section of the following link for details, including tips on how to maximize your battery life.
    The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions. If you haven't already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.

    It's not good to fully drain the battery. You can plug in or unplug at any charge level, but fully draining it is not recommended. There is no "built-in exercising regime."
     
  13. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #13
    Why? Continual cycling in the 90-100% region is not as good for any battery long-term as "proper" usage.

    Laptop battery designers design to a deeper cycle than that...
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #14
    Apple charging technology is designed to prevent short discharges/recharges in the 93-99% range. There is no need to deeply discharge an Apple notebook battery.
     
  15. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #15
     
  16. kerrikins macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    #16
    On this page: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1490 they also say that that process isn't necessary for newer notebooks, so there are points to both sides.
     
  17. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #17
    The Forum FAQ is derived directly from Apple's documentation. You've misread the statement by Apple on the page you linked. Here is what is actually stated:
    The quote is referring to a notebook that isn't used on a daily basis, so it's not being cycled regularly. In such a case, you should run it on battery enough to cycle it at least once per month. That doesn't mean you need to fully drain the battery, as the battery can be cycled without fully draining it. Read the WHAT IS A CYCLE? section of the following link. The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions. If you haven't already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.
    There are two separate items: fully draining a battery and calibrating a battery. Simply draining and recharging a battery is not the same as calibrating it.
     
  18. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #18
    Charging regime and calibration are two unrelated topics, it is quite possible to have a battery ruined by poor usage but have the battery gauge accurately reflecting the (lower) remaining capacity (i.e. correctly calibrated), it is also possible to have a perfectly good battery with unreliable calibration (i.e. the battery gauge is inaccurate).

    Apples' advice is that calibration is now unnecessary on newer (non-removable), MBP/A's however good battery health is retained by using their charging/usage/storage advice on the page I quoted.

    ----------

    Yep, read it but I'm going to go by Apple's advice which is to use the battery, I've never known a battery that has suffered negatively by being used within its design parameters, I have know many batteries lose capacity by being under-used. Note the MBP will shutdown before the battery is dangerously discharged (from the battery's perspective), else Apple warranty claims for batteries would go through the roof.
     
  19. carjakester macrumors 68020

    carjakester

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Location:
    Midwest
    #19
    i take mine to school and use it for about 2 hours and the battery hasn't gone below 80% before.
     

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