What could you mix yogurt in so you don't have to taste it?

Hieveryone

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So, I'm supposed to eat some yogurt, but I really hate it. I was wondering what I could mix it in so I don't notice it?

I was thinking a smoothie. Maybe strawberry, mango, ice, sugar, and yogurt...

Any other ideas?
 

Scepticalscribe

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Jul 29, 2008
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So, I'm supposed to eat some yogurt, but I really hate it. I was wondering what I could mix it in so I don't notice it?

I was thinking a smoothie. Maybe strawberry, mango, ice, sugar, and yogurt...

Any other ideas?
Honey.

Greeks eat seriously good natural yogurt with honey, and it is delicious (and natural, and heathy).
[doublepost=1561413490][/doublepost]
Supposed to eat yogurt? Why?
Actually, for breakfast, these days, I often take kefir instead of yogurt - as it is more 'liquid', it is easier to drink.

And, most of the time, I take it neat, without honey.
 

Hieveryone

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Honey.

Greeks eat seriously good natural yogurt with honey, and it is delicious (and natural, and heathy).
[doublepost=1561413490][/doublepost]

Actually, for breakfast, these days, I often take kefir instead of yogurt - as it is more 'liquid', it is easier to drink.

And, most of the time, I take it neat, without honey.
Yeah kefir is an option too but is it any good? I’ve never heard of it and a quick google search didn’t sound too appealing to me. Seemed like it tastes sour?
[doublepost=1561416313][/doublepost]
I don't suppose as a buttermilk replacement in deep fried chicken will work for you?
If it were an option that would be perfect but I don’t know. I love buttermilk fried chicken and/or shrimp
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
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Yeah kefir is an option too but is it any good? I’ve never heard of it and a quick google search didn’t sound too appealing to me. Seemed like it tastes sour?
Well, yes, it tastes sour.

Personally, I like sour tastes - I start each day with a freshly squeezed fruit juice comprised of oranges, grapefruit and sometimes, lemons as well.

What is your issue?

You don't like "sour" tastes?

Add sugar, (brown gives a richer taste), or honey, or jam (conserve, or preserve).
 

AngerDanger

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Dec 9, 2008
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Ooh, if the issue you have is with how sour yogurt is, suck on a miracle berry before eating it! :)

91XtvngjNKL._SL1500_.jpg

You know how mint makes certain sweet things sour? Well, the miracle berry (Synsepalum dulcificum) has the opposite effect. They're really cool, and you can buy them online as tablets.

I normally jump at every opportunity I get to give the OP an irreverent answer and, if I can, work in something alluding to their other… more interesting threads, but these berries are so ****ing cool!

This past Christmas, I bought my cousins some along with BeanBoozeled, strawberries and vinegar to see what effect they had. They were so—okay, so I was more excited than anybody else about the flavor-augmenting berries, but still…
 
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Zenithal

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Sep 10, 2009
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Jam or preserves. The sour notes of yogurt will shine through regardless of what you add to it. You can lessen the sour notes, though.




Ooh, if the issue you have is with how sour yogurt is, suck on a miracle berry before eating it! :)


You know how mint makes certain sweet things sour? Well, the miracle berry (Synsepalum dulcificum) has the opposite effect. They're really cool, and you can buy them online as tablets.

I normally jump at every opportunity I get to give the OP an irreverent answer and, if I can, work in something alluding to their other… more interesting threads, but these berries are so ****ing cool!

This past Christmas, I bought my cousins some along with BeanBoozeled, strawberries and vinegar to see what effect they had. They were so—okay, so I was more excited than anybody else about the flavor-augmenting berries, but still…
I've had the fresh miracle fruit. Very different from the tablets.
 

Hieveryone

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Jam or preserves. The sour notes of yogurt will shine through regardless of what you add to it. You can lessen the sour notes, though.






I've had the fresh miracle fruit. Very different from the tablets.
Yeah I’ve had Jam before in yogurt. I actually might just do that.
[doublepost=1561420107][/doublepost]
Well, yes, it tastes sour.

Personally, I like sour tastes - I start each day with a freshly squeezed fruit juice comprised of oranges, grapefruit and sometimes, lemons as well.

What is your issue?

You don't like "sour" tastes?

Add sugar, (brown gives a richer taste), or honey, or jam (conserve, or preserve).
I’m just not a dairy person. I avoid dairy and wheat but to each his/her own.
 
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decafjava

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Feb 7, 2011
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I'm guessing you are supposed to eat yogourt for some digestive issues or maybe had antibiotics prescribed - anyhow I really can only second what others have mentioned - honey (preferably a very aromatic floral honey) jam or dark brown sugar.

If you have a blender - and you should - smoothies with the above ingredients and/or fresh seasonal fruit are another idea. Healthy breakfast or snack.
 
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Hieveryone

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Just an update.

I went with strawberries, ice, yogurt, and sugar.

Meh. But works all right for me.
 

jtara

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Mar 23, 2009
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You've never said just what it is about the taste of yogurt that you don't like. I ASSUME - as others have - that you don't like the sour taste. To confirm, do you also dislike citrus, vinegar, etc.? Or only in or light concentration? The "sour" taste is from acidity.

There is really nothing to "mix into" yogurt to moderate the sour taste. But you could choose a DIFFERENT YOGURT, with a lower acidity.

I make my own French Yogurt ("French" generally means using a specific proportion of (usually) 4 different cultures, and made in a glass jar from which it is dispensed.) I found by accident the formula for lower-acid yogurt. I myself prefer a tangier yogurt, but it order to make thick yogurt that holds together well and does not "weep" much (my preference) the acidity will inevitably go down as part of the process. Lowering the culture temperature and increasing culture time reduces acidity and at the same time creates a thicker yogurt without draining whey (which would make it Greek Yogurt, or - carrying it a step further - Labne).

Currently, I've settled into culturing at 100F for 24 hours. (More typical is 110-115 for 6-12 hours.) I've had friends who "do not like" plain yogurt comment that they don't find the flavor objectionable. Myself - I would rather have the tang while still having the thick consistency. I use a Sous Vide tank to maintain consistent temperature of 100F (mason jars are immersed in the water bath) through most of the culturing, though I do start at 110F and let it ramp down at the natural rate of the water bath to 100F.

FWIW, I use Strauss milk ("cleanest dairy in America", claimed, at least...) and original starter was from a small container of St. Benoit. I reserve a small amount of each batch as starter for the next. Now, St. Benoit itself is wonderful yogurt, and if you can get it locally, I highly recommend it, but it is EXPENSIVE. I mean, the Strauss milk is already expensive at $8/gallon for the organic, but the St. Benoit milk (from Jersey cows) is $4.50/quart and only comes in quarts! The yogurt is about $6/quart. I make a similar yogurt myself for $2/quart plus a little electricity, but the cows aren't from "Joisey". (and, yes, I know the cows are named for the "Joisey" in ENGLAND...)

Anyway, test different yogurts. If you go for a French style yogurt that comes in a glass jar, is thick and does not "weep" a lot of whey, and has no added ingredients (check for sugar, gelatin, other thickeners or binders - the ONLY acceptable ingredients are milk and yogurt cultures) it will likely also have a lower acidity. It will not be cheap, though.
 
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Sword86

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Oct 6, 2012
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You get used to it.....way back I started out adding peanut butter.
I was pleasantly surprised the first time I tried Kefir. I expected it would suck. I don’t buy it because I don’t want the sugar content. S
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
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The Russians (and former communist countries, not just the countries of the former USSR, such as Ukraine, but also places such as Poland, the Czech Republic etc) have flavoured kefir (strawberry, peach, mango) etc, which can be very pleasant to drink, as they are not too sweet.
 

jeyf

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Jan 20, 2009
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You get used to it.....way back I started out adding peanut butter.
I was pleasantly surprised the first time I tried Kefir. I expected it would suck. I don’t buy it because I don’t want the sugar content. S
[doublepost=1561496821][/doublepost]Simple but dramatic
Greek Yogurt + maple syrup
 

jtara

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Mar 23, 2009
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Greek yogurt is considerably less acidic (and therefore less tart/sour) than regular yogurt.

If you can live with the environment impact.

Acidic whey released in rivers is a HUGE problems in areas where Greek Yogurt is produced at scale.

I used to make Greek yogurt, and have to admit I used to dispose of the whey.

Now I occasionally make Labne strained even more than Greek yogurt) but now I save the whey, as it can be used as part of injected marinade/tenderizer for red meats. Milk sometimes develops sticky white lumps which is off-putting, to say the least! Whey rather than milk tenderizes just as well, and won't create those un-attactive cooked white lumps. 1/2 whey, 1/2 apple juice, 5% salt by weight, 6% sugar by weight).
 

MisterSavage

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Nov 10, 2018
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Greek yogurt is considerably less acidic (and therefore less tart/sour) than regular yogurt.
I was going to say this also. I think greek yogurt is much more palpable.

Ooh, if the issue you have is with how sour yogurt is, suck on a miracle berry before eating it! :)


You know how mint makes certain sweet things sour? Well, the miracle berry (Synsepalum dulcificum) has the opposite effect. They're really cool, and you can buy them online as tablets.

I normally jump at every opportunity I get to give the OP an irreverent answer and, if I can, work in something alluding to their other… more interesting threads, but these berries are so ****ing cool!

This past Christmas, I bought my cousins some along with BeanBoozeled, strawberries and vinegar to see what effect they had. They were so—okay, so I was more excited than anybody else about the flavor-augmenting berries, but still…
I buy these for an elderly relative that's on chemo. She said things taste bad and these have helped her!
 
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gtg465x

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Sep 12, 2016
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If you are supposed to eat it for digestive support, because you’re on antibiotics, to treat irritable bowel syndrome or something similar, just buy some probiotic pills instead. They will have a lot more good bacteria than yogurt anyways and you won’t have to taste yogurt if that’s your issue.
 
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steve knight

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Jan 28, 2009
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If you are supposed to eat it for digestive support, because you’re on antibiotics, to treat irritable bowel syndrome or something similar, just buy some probiotic pills instead. They will have a lot more good bacteria than yogurt anyways and you won’t have to taste yogurt if that’s your issue.
right yogurt is not very effective. but you want to get the higher quality refrigerated ones.
 

jtara

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Mar 23, 2009
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but you want to get the higher quality refrigerated ones.
There are NON-refrigerated ones?!

Actually, yogurt is supposed to be safe to leave out. I wouldn't do it, though. I leave butter and ghee out. (Butter bell for butter, I put a little salt in the water since I use unsalted butter - the salt controls various nasty growth) And ghee in the jar in which it was bought. (Why Whole Foods refrigerates one brand of ghee - but not others - is beyond me...)