What principles should distinguish a Christian business?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by iDisk, May 13, 2011.

  1. iDisk, May 13, 2011
    Last edited: May 13, 2011

    iDisk macrumors 6502a

    iDisk

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    #1
    Are there certain laws, rules, or principles that delineate a secular business enterprise from that of a Christian business? What are the identifying hallmarks of a Christian business? Are there any biblical guidelines to managing a Christian business?

    Awhile ago a study conducted by the Gallup organization and the National Opinion Research Center revealed that 78% of all Americans claim they want to experience some form of spiritual growth. Of this group, half of them felt they were too busy with their careers to enjoy God or even give enough time to developing their spiritual lives. And when polled about their workplace, it was found that when businesses provided spiritually-minded programs they felt not only more calm and relaxed, but were in fact more productive.

    Additionally, it was discovered that those who worked for Christian business organizations where spiritual values were encouraged were less fearful and more committed to their workplace goals, as well as less likely to compromise their values. Ian Mitroff, professor at the USC School of Business, says that “spirituality could be the ultimate competitive advantage.”

    What then are the key principles that set apart these organizations that place a high premium on Christian values? Though we could name many, there are three biblical principles that stand out that define a Christian business worthy of that name.

    First is integrity. Integrity is about Christ-centered living. It is about doing what is right rather than what is expedient. The organization with integrity will make its business decisions based on the standards and principles of God—righteousness, truth and honesty. That is, there is congruency between what the organization verbalizes and what it practices. No one can point a finger at such a company and justifiably cry out, "Hypocrite"! For this reason Socrates (469-399 BC) declared, “The greatest way to live with honor in this world is to be what we pretend to be.” A Christian business is the epitome of integrity. This means “we are who we say we are.”

    Second is a commitment to excellence. Paul said: “This is a trustworthy saying. And I want you to stress these things, so that those who have trusted in God may be careful to devote themselves to doing what is good. These things are excellent and profitable for everyone” (Titus 3:8). If an organization is to be recognized as an exemplary one, one whose goal is to glorify God through its commitment to excellence in its service and product, it must always honor God and be thoroughly cognizant of its role and mission in a pagan world. Such an organization never forgets that God has called them to be His witness before the lost world in which they do business.

    When business organizations commit themselves to the pursuit of excellence they exalt the Word of God. And as the Gallup and National Research Center study revealed, they also demonstrate God’s power to transform lives, not only through their employees but with their customers as well.

    Finally, a Christian business should have a commitment to its people. This includes the area of fair compensation, performance recognition, and providing growth opportunities, both professionally and personally. It has been determined that organizations that recognize the needs of their people and create opportunities for them to fulfill those needs are able to bring out the very best in them. The Apostle Paul was very clear about relationships between employers and employees. To those who work for someone else, Paul gave this command: “Slaves, obey your earthly masters in everything; and do it, not only when their eye is on you and to win their favor, but with sincerity of heart and reverence for the Lord. Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving” (Colossians 3:22-24).

    Then to employers, Paul commanded: “Masters, provide your slaves with what is right and fair, because you know that you also have a Master in heaven” (Colossians 4:1). Paul gave this command to employers because, just as their employees report to them, they themselves have someone to report to—their Master in heaven. Employers could hardly expect to be treated fairly by God if they failed to treat their employees fairly. Paul’s remarks concerning the employee/employer relationship involves the mutual submission of employees to their employers and vice versa. Employees, too, are to treat their employers with respect and “obey them not only to win their favor when their eye is on you, but like slaves of Christ, doing the will of God from your heart” (Ephesians 6:6).

    In all things, for both employers and employees, Christ should be the model for Christian business, because He was known to be a man of integrity, even among His enemies (Matthew 22:16).

    *** Source Gotquestions.org
     
  2. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

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    #2
    Oh hell... Here we go.

    Why does a 'Christian' business have to be any different from any other business?

    The owner's belief structure is irrelevant. The question here is whether you want to run an 'ethical' business. Christianity just doesn't come into it.
     
  3. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    #3
    Oh great, more long-winded drivel.

    Personally I place more "faith" in a business/person that has their own capacity for ethics over the one requiring a wrathful book of tales convincing them about right from wrong. Critical thinking being pretty important in business and all.
     
  4. iStudentUK macrumors 65816

    iStudentUK

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    #4
    It seems the three examples you listed are what is needed for any successful business.

    Religious people running a business, no problem. There are no special rules though.
     
  5. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #5
    tl;dr.

    But I will answer the the thread title. What principles should distinguish a Christian business?

    When I worked for a business that was run and staffed by [mostly] staunch Christians, I couldn't help but notice the number of inspirational and devotional posters on the wall.

    I'd also hear things like, "How's it going , Phil?" "He's on high, Fred"

    Yup. That distinguished that business as a Christian one.
     
  6. codymac macrumors 6502

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    #6
    No kidding. OP should seek out a vicar.
     
  7. Rt&Dzine macrumors 6502a

    Rt&Dzine

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    #7
    Integrity, commitment to excellence, and commitment to its employees, don't distinguish a Christian business. Those principles distinguish an excellent business. You need to come up with some principles that are distinctly Christian.

    What principles are unique to Christians?
     
  8. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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  9. IntelliUser macrumors 6502

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    #9
    Let's see, a Christian business.
    I guess it would be based on unproven economic policies off of some ancient book which the business owners blindly believe in and want to force upon the entire market.

    Now I think I get Republicans.
     
  10. Pink∆Floyd macrumors 68020

    Pink∆Floyd

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  11. Heilage macrumors 68030

    Heilage

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    #11
    Maybe denying gay people service? Or people who have had abortions?


    (Yeah, that's a low blow. I know.)
     
  12. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #12
    Chik-Fil-A. gives their profits to hate groups like Focus on the Family.
     
  13. Rt&Dzine macrumors 6502a

    Rt&Dzine

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    #13
    To recap ideas thrown out so far.

    Possibilities for distinguishing a Christian business:

    1. Inspirational posters
      .
    2. Christian salutations
      .
    3. Denying service to sinners (particular sins)
      .
    4. Donating profits to charities with anti-gay agendas
     
  14. eawmp1 macrumors 601

    eawmp1

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    #14
    The tenets above are just good business. However:

    If the "blah, blah, blah" has a lot of scripture and references to Jesus, it's a Christian business.

    If the "blah, blah, blah" has a lot of Koran passages and references to Mohammed, it's a Muslim business.

    etc.
     
  15. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    #16
    iDisk, my friend, I'm confused a little. Are you just speaking in general about how to operate a business or are you talking about Christians setting themselves apart by advertising and labeling themselves as a "Christian Business"?

    If you are talking about labeling, then in all honesty I just think that's silly. Nowhere in scripture do you see God calling us to set ourselves apart in a condescending manner and the notion of a business advertised as "Christian" is right on, if not over, that line. As many other posters have mentioned, how do you sell a product or offer a service in a "Christian" manner. I understand the internal workings of a Christian business might be run differently, like some businesses that are closed on Sunday, but in terms of interaction with the general public, I don't see how it would be any different.

    Are non Christian businesses not capable of operating ethically or with good customer service? Do you own a Christian computer or a Christian vehicle, does a Christian chicken sandwich taste better than a pagan chicken sandwich? Faith is about how you live, not about what you tell others about how you live. Actions speak louder than words... and advertising.

    Just my $0.02.
     
  16. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    #17
    I agree. My impression is iDisk is a PRSI tourist, using the forum to study opposition arguments for some other pre-determined purpose, such as prepping Sunday Schools lesson, or drafting propaganda flyers.
     
  17. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #18
    I knew his username sounded familiar. He's done this before. Comes into PRSI, spews his anti-everything that isn't Christian hate, and leaves for a few months. This too shall pass.
     
  18. torbjoern macrumors 65816

    torbjoern

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    #19
    Christian business? You mean like a Church or something?
     
  19. Moyank24 macrumors 601

    Moyank24

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    #21
  20. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #22
    Yeah, I'm pretty sure one of the ten commandments tells you not to do that. Tsk tsk tsk...
     
  21. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    #23
  22. iDisk thread starter macrumors 6502a

    iDisk

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    #24
    I support the accurate interpretations of that site ... It's very resourceful and I never claimed it as my own... but out of respect and less confusion, I will site source.
     
  23. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    #25
    That is your response? You will now site the source material "out of respect and less confusion"? That is the most tool-ish statement I've ever read to justify PLAGIARISM.

    Grow the **** up.
     

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