What should my job title be? my boss asked me...

thecritix

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Dec 11, 2006
284
0
West London, England
Hi Guys

My boss's former title was Web manager (I can't be web manager as it is still her role!) although she's now Head of Marketing and Web.. I applied for the position of Web content manager but I was titled web editor by my boss and everyone when I started..

Anyway, the companies changed a lot and people have left etc and since starting my job has evolved to take on the following roles.
I discussed this with my boss who has asked me what I feel my new title ought to be:

The roles I perform:
the general duties of a Web content manager plus..

SEO, affiliate schemes, partnerships, analytics reporting and tracking, Email marketing (building and designing/monitoring), affiliate schemes, site developments and upgrades liaising with the techies!


Does anyone have any ideas, she suggested something like Web Content & Retentions manager?

I want something that sounds good (obviously..) but also something that employers will look for in the future when looking for like a head of e-commerce or head of web type position.

Answers on a postcard!

Nick
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,218
1,584
Does it really matter? It's like calling a shelf stacker a merchandise display expert or a bin man a waste tech!

As long as you get paid and people at your workplace know what your job is it dosnt require a title.
 

grapes911

Moderator emeritus
Jul 28, 2003
6,943
3
Citizens Bank Park
Does it really matter? It's like calling a shelf stacker a merchandise display expert or a bin man a waste tech!

As long as you get paid and people at your workplace know what your job is it dosnt require a title.
Agreed. I do some hiring and the first thing I do is ignore the applicant's previous titles and read their job responsibilities instead.
 

Raid

macrumors 68020
Feb 18, 2003
2,144
3,951
Toronto
Does it really matter? It's like calling a shelf stacker a merchandise display expert or a bin man a waste tech!

As long as you get paid and people at your workplace know what your job is it dosnt require a title.
It does matter... sort of. The irony is that it really doesn't matter to your current employer because they already know what you do, but it does matter to others looking at your resume because it denotes the level and purpose of past employment.

To the OP, if you actually managed people (i.e. they reported to you) make sure 'Manager' is in that title somewhere, at the very least try to get the word 'Senior' in your position title. ;)

Looking at the brief job description how does "Manager, Web Content and Strategic Development" sound?

Agreed. I do some hiring and the first thing I do is ignore the applicant's previous titles and read their job responsibilities instead.
You're one of the rare ones then, the HR people I knew had around 400 applicants per job so when a computer didn't score the resume, they eliminated candidates by experience, education and title.
 

Zombie Acorn

macrumors 65816
Feb 2, 2009
1,301
9,063
Toronto, Ontario
Master of the Interwebs, Ruler of the plethenons, and Destroyer of Peoples.

or

President of the United States.

It does matter... sort of. The irony is that it really doesn't matter to your current employer because they already know what you do, but it does matter to others looking at your resume because it denotes the level and purpose of past employment.

To the OP, if you actually managed people (i.e. they reported to you) make sure 'Manager' is in that title somewhere, at the very least try to get the word 'Senior' in your position title. ;)

Looking at the brief job description how does "Manager, Web Content and Strategic Development" sound?

You're one of the rare ones then, the HR people I knew had around 400 applicants per job so when a computer didn't score the resume, they eliminated candidates by experience, education and title.
I have to agree here, HR nutballs don't know the difference in your qualifications anyways, a good job title that sounds fancy may be all you need. Senior Executive Web Resource Manager
 

djellison

macrumors 68020
Feb 2, 2007
2,228
4
Pasadena CA
it does matter to others looking at your resume ....
No it doesn't. You don't look at the title - you look at the job description and the scope and scale of their responsibilities and abilities. A job title means very very little.

Given that - just swop editor for director if it makes you feel better :)
 

grapes911

Moderator emeritus
Jul 28, 2003
6,943
3
Citizens Bank Park
You're one of the rare ones then, the HR people I knew had around 400 applicants per job so when a computer didn't score the resume, they eliminated candidates by experience, education and title.
We are small (about 40 people) so there is no HR to filter anything out. If there is anything I learned during the hiring process, it is that companies don't normalize anything including titles. Thus, I completely ignore them.
 

Raid

macrumors 68020
Feb 18, 2003
2,144
3,951
Toronto
No it doesn't. You don't look at the title - you look at the job description and the scope and scale of their responsibilities and abilities. A job title means very very little.

Given that - just swop editor for director if it makes you feel better :)
Unfortunately that's theory versus practice.

OP here's a link you might find useful, it's primarily used to check if you're getting compensated correctly (and PLEASE take that info with a grain of salt) but it does have some generic job descriptions that might help you make an informed decision what the market titles out there are.
Payscale -UK version
 

lethalOne

macrumors member
Feb 14, 2008
70
0
Toronto ON
No, please don't do that!

We are small (about 40 people) so there is no HR to filter anything out. If there is anything I learned during the hiring process, it is that companies don't normalize anything including titles. Thus, I completely ignore them.
A now extinct company I used to work for took great care to separate managers of people from managers of functions (ie. Product Managers or people with zero reports).

Manager, Systems meant you had staff.
Systems Manager meant you had no staff.
 

iShater

macrumors 604
Aug 13, 2002
6,967
370
Chicagoland
Title is important for someone scanning through a resume in the future, and it is quick one line summary that gives an idea of what you did.

Maybe if someone is hiring at a small company they wouldn't look at it, most companies do. HR def does.
 

electroshock

macrumors 6502a
Sep 7, 2009
647
0
Web Marketing Maven?

It's your opportunity to jazz up the title a bit. Personally, I prefer 'Packet Plumber', but that's just me...
 

thecritix

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Dec 11, 2006
284
0
West London, England
I completely understand..

Confectionary and refreshments manager could be tea boy..


But..

It's important to me! and I think it does make a difference to recruiters and potential employers in the future.

I think, Web Content & Retention Manager

Thoughts?
 

MacVixen

macrumors 6502
Jan 26, 2009
385
0
Santa Cruz, CA
As a former HR "nutball" :p I do think the title is important, but it needs to be something that makes sense so that people don't feel you are just the teaboy.

I like "Manager, Web Content and Strategic Development" that Raid suggested. It gives the impression that you are the main person in charge of a specific section of the organization, as opposed to a title of say, "Project Manager" which is a little more general.

Just my $0.02 :)