What the heck did Mojave do to make the login screen so slow?

Discussion in 'macOS Mojave (10.14)' started by PowerMac G4 MDD, May 2, 2019.

  1. PowerMac G4 MDD macrumors 68000

    PowerMac G4 MDD

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2014
    Location:
    At the intersection of Conch and Coral.
    #1
    First off, my screen takes a longer to wake up; secondly, my keyboard input is not present for the first couple seconds that the login screen is there: I type most of my password before the keyboard input actually starts working. When I see the password entry screen, I want to enter my password—not wait for a response.

    In addition, if I type in my password incorrectly (which I do often, because of this fault with Mojave), it takes longer to recognize it as incorrect than previous versions of OSX had. Rather than immediately rejecting the incorrect password, it waits a second or two before doing so.

    This is one of the many ways in which Slo-jave has taken OSX and made it objectively less efficient / slower.
     
  2. redheeler macrumors 604

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #2
    My 5K iMac has an external drive attached via Thunderbolt 2, and every time I wake it from sleep, it spins up the drive and waits for a response. This amounts to about a 5-10 second wait before anything shows up on the screen.

    I don't recall prior versions of MacOS doing this, but I could be wrong. There's no reason the OS would have to spin up the external drive until I need to access something, as the system files are all on the internal SSD.
     
  3. fisherking, May 2, 2019
    Last edited: May 2, 2019

    fisherking macrumors 604

    fisherking

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Location:
    ny somewhere
    #3
    this is not a problem everyone is having, so it's not a mojave issue per se; but (of course) an issue still worth resolving.

    here's some ideas:
    run disk first aid
    reset the SMC
    reset NVRAM
    install the combo updater:https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1996?locale=en_US

    google any of these things if you need information for your particular mac.

    just a thought, but asking for (and getting) help can be so much more rewarding than griping...
     
  4. a2jack macrumors regular

    a2jack

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    #4
    Here too ... 2012 i5 mini 500g spinner/ 16g Ram.
     
  5. PowerMac G4 MDD thread starter macrumors 68000

    PowerMac G4 MDD

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2014
    Location:
    At the intersection of Conch and Coral.
    #5
    My laptop experiences the issue, and I'm not even using it with an external drive—it's the SSD, alone. This is an issue that I wasn't experiencing with High Sierra or earlier. Mojave has taken this blazing-fast laptop and has made it feel mediocre. I remember how fine and flying it was back when it used to run Mavericks. *sigh* Even High Sierra was much faster.
    --- Post Merged, May 9, 2019 ---

    I will try those first few things; however, as far as doing Web-searches on the topic goes, it's pointless: all I get are those stupid articles that come out with every single OS update and follow the same exact pattern: "MOJAVE RUNNING SLOW? FOLLOW THESE TIPS!" Step 1: free up space on your HDD. <--- Um... nope.
     
  6. iOSpecialist macrumors member

    iOSpecialist

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2016
    Location:
    Canada
    #6
    Never really thought about complaining but my 2012 MBP with an SSD does that on Mojave too. Weird.
     
  7. Honza1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    US
    #7
    Well, the very first screen with choice of login names, which opens field where one types password seems slower than before. That is true.

    Note, that the lock screen (when full system is running) is quite fast for me. Slow is ONLY the screen (looks same as lock screen) when I start my computer, now when unlocking from sleep/lock.

    I actually assumed that this is intentional and for safety reasons. This is one place we want the system to be slow - it slows down meaningfully password brute force attacks. If the system reacts slowly and delays each unsuccessful try of password by 3 or more seconds, it may become impractical to brute force longer passwords at all. And since regular user sees this screen rarely (may be once per day?) the cost of this safety feature would be relatively small...

    Now, that is simply my assumption. I just looked at it, accepted, and ignored it. Has zero impact on my computer use.

    Also, on my system I have FileVault 2 switched on, so this screen uses only small fraction of loader operating system. May be this loader system does not have all caching and accelerations available?
     

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6 May 2, 2019