What the XXXX is wrong with Brazil?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by vrDrew, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #1
    Don't get me wrong. Brazil is a beautiful, fascinating country.

    But there is obviously something deeply, fundamentally wrong with a country where a man convicted of murdering his ex-lover and feeding her to his pet dogs, gets signed to a professional football (soccer) contract.

    I was in India not long ago. And I observed that while that country's cities seemed filled with glittering high-rises and luxury shopping malls, it somehow hasn't gotten around to tackling the problems of providing basic public amenities like working toilets and safe drinking water. And I told my (wealthy) hosts that to their face: Your priorities are wrong.

    Brazil is somewhat different. But I'll confess there is something tragically wrong with a culture - and a legal system - that would allow a confessed murderer to go free on such flimsy grounds. What is utterly incomprehensible to me is how any professional soccer team could consider signing such an individual, regardless of his talents.

    Have these people absolutely NO shame?
     
  2. PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #2
    Football (the one you play with feet) is a religion.

    Religion demands human sacrifice.
     
  3. chown33 macrumors 604

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    #3
    Upvoted because this works equally well as both bitter sarcasm and grim truth.
     
  4. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #4
    Well, we live in a country where bankers collapse the financial market and who goes to jail... no one.

    We have seen wealthy and fameous murders walk free. Look at OJ Simpson. Or how about Michael Skakel, nephew of the Kennedy family whose defense to murder/semen found at crimescene was jerking off in a tree... because that's normal. It took a few decades but he was finally convicted. Or Ethan Couch, the teen diagnosed with "affluenza" who killed 4 people in a drunken car accident, no jail time, only some probation.

    In my personal life I know affluent people who have committed crimes and been given minimal punishment (i.e. 20 years in prison vs 1 year probation). Probably not the same punishment less affluent people would be given. Money buys prestigious legal teams and minimal consequences.
     
  5. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #5
    Latin America is inflicted with macho attitudes. The countries within Latin America have varying rates of femicide and or rape of women. It isn't surprising to read this kind of news coming out Brazil. I believe El Salvador is possibly the most dangerous country in the world to be a woman in. The homicide rate and count (according to the net) is higher than any other country from other regions, including the ME.
     
  6. PracticalMac, Mar 14, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017

    PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #6
    Thank you.
    It is challenge to post biting responses here, quite a few very astute people here (and those that are not, they too sometimes have worthy comments)

    And they are some of the strongest religious fervor too, and yet seem to mean nothing.
    :(:(:(
     
  7. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #7
    I direct you towards Italy and their religious fervor and defiling of young boys.
     
  8. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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  9. weckart macrumors 68040

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  10. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68030

    Ulenspiegel

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    #10

    Drew, what was the answer of your Indian hosts, what was their reaction? I am really interested.
    (Sorry for the "off").
     
  11. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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  12. Number-Six, Mar 15, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017

    Number-Six macrumors 6502

    Number-Six

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    #12
    I don't think the people in the US are in any position to judge others for their choices and certainly not in any position to tell anyone their priorities are wrong

    Not when you think it's ok to have a budget of nearly 600 billion on military spending and yet cannot figure out affordable health care for everyone.

    Your priorities are clearly wrong
     
  13. martint235 macrumors regular

    martint235

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    #13
    So basically a man committed a crime and was sent to jail for it. He's appealed and has been released pending appeal. While he's waiting he's gone back to his old job.

    Are you saying that anyone released on appeal (or for that matter after serving a full sentence) should not be allowed to work again?
     
  14. vrDrew thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #14
    He admitted to conspiring to kill the mother of his child, cutting her up and feeding her to his dogs.

    If Yo Yo Ma committed a crime comparable to that, I wouldn't go and listen to a concert with him as a featured performer. On principle. His abilities as a cellist and musician notwithstanding.

    The very act of paying money to go and see such a person becomes an implicit endorsement of behavior that is so repugnant as to beggar belief.

    As I alluded to earlier: There is something dreadfully wrong with Brazil's system of criminal justice. Starting with the fact that a person appealing their conviction is freed from incarceration. IMHO, once an individual is convicted and sent to prison - the burden of proof then falls upon them before being released. Secondly, whatever Judge permitted this guy to be released should have imposed conditions similar to house arrest pending the hearing of the appeal.

    What message is Brazil's criminal justice system; it's judges, and it's football-mad culture sending to every other young man in the favelas and barrios of Rio and Belo Horizonte? If you are a good enough soccer player, it really doesn't matter what you do. You, quite literally, can get away with murder.
     
  15. martint235 macrumors regular

    martint235

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    #15
    The Brazilian justice system is their own to run and if they feel it's "better for 10 guilty people to go free than one innocent person" to be incarcerated that is up to them.

    You don't answer my key question though which is once a person has been through the legal system, should they not be allowed to work?

    It's up to you whether you go to see an artist or to watch a footballer. It's also up to you whether or not you employ a plumber with a criminal record but your posts seem to imply that because this guy is a footballer he should no longer be allowed to work.
     
  16. spacemnspiff, Mar 15, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017

    spacemnspiff macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    That was really insightful, must have really helped them re-assess 'their priorities'. Where can I get one of them high horses?

    Another example, corruption at it's finest. https://www.washingtonpost.com/inve...7d15a24e0_story.html?wpisrc=nl_rainbow&wpmm=1

    Or open your jaws wide, child marriages in US, can this be true? Think again.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/post...d-girls-get-married/?wpisrc=nl_rainbow&wpmm=1

    Or how about - Every 98 seconds another American is sexually assaulted. And most likely it's a woman.
    https://www.rainn.org/statistics/scope-problem

    I think I need to look harder for those really fine high horses.
     
  17. Galacticos macrumors 6502a

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