What to use to burn 10GB movie?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by xchaotic, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. xchaotic macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    #1
    Hi.

    While I have been using Macs in 6.x ancient times, I came back just a while ago.

    What should I use to burn files in general?

    Roxio Toast seem popular?

    In this particular case, I have a 10GB x264 video, perhaps there is a way to split it into playable 4.7GB chunks?
     
  2. hughvane macrumors 6502

    hughvane

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
    Location:
    Banks Peninsula, New Zealand
    #2
    Lots of opinions about it, but Handbrake is arguable the best for burning movies. Popcorn gets regular mention, also Toast. Whichever, burning a movie of that size is going to take a long time. See this link http://www.versiontracker.com/macosx/audio/rip-burn for product ratings (it's not just audio btw).
     
  3. xchaotic thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    #3
    Thanks.

    I mentioned x264, because that's taking most space. I don' want/need to reencode.
    But I'm also thinking of archiving smaller files and burning stuff to dvd in general.
    In os x there seems to be a convention to use separate program for each kind of media.
    Different, but I can see the advantages - one program that does one thing well.
     
  4. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #4
    If you just want to copy files to optical media the finder can do that. create a "burn folder" drag stuff there then click "burn to disc".

    The reason you see all these special purpose programs is they make that one job easier, people would rather buy something then figure out how to use a general purpose tool.
     
  5. Dimwhit macrumors 68000

    Dimwhit

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    #5
    You might look at using iMovie or MPEG Streamclip to split that into different chunks. Looks like you might need three separate chunks. You can go the iMovie > iDVD route. How long, in minutes, is the video clip? The advantage of iMovie is that you can split the video more where you'd like and put some fade-ins and fade-outs to make it look a little more presentable. And you can pick where to split it.

    You also might first use MPEG Streamclip to convert it to .dv first, since iMovie likes that format (though it can work with other formats, as well).
     
  6. cdcastillo macrumors 6502a

    cdcastillo

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Location:
    The cesspit of civilization
    #6
    My opinion

    If I had a 10GB video file and I would like to burn it to a physical disk for watching on a regular home dvd player (this is what I infer you need based on what you asked: "playable 4.7 GB chunks"), I would try some of this:

    Option 1. If it is already on VOB format (mpeg2, dvd discs), I would use DVD2OneX to shrink it to a dual layer DVD (think about 8.4 GB) or even to a single layer DVD. then burn it with Disk utility

    Option 2. if it is not on VOB, Convert it to it using VisualHub and selecting "Burning when done"


    As a previous poster warned you: this could take a lot of time, depending on the computer you have.

    Hope this helps.
     

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