When did Republicanism go crazy? And can it be redeemed?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by vrDrew, Oct 31, 2015.

  1. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #1
    According to some of my talk-radio-listening friends, I am a bleeding heart pinko.

    But in reality, I'm not. Like most people, I don't think a very high tax rate is good for the economy or for society. I don't like an overly intrusive Government. I believe we need a strong and professional defense department. And, true confession: I voted, enthusiastically, for Ronald Reagan.

    Somewhere between the Gipper's "Morning in America" and Sarah Palin's nomination speech - Republicans in this country simply lost it. I can't pin down the exact moment: Maybe it was the "Willie Horton" ad. Maybe it was the Clinton impeachment fracas. But whenever and however it happened, today's Republican party no longer is capable of nominating or electing politicians with the qualifications and worldview necessary to function in the 21st century. A look at the panel of grifters and lightweights on the Debate stage last week ought to be the clearest indication of that.

    Can Republicanism be saved? Is there some combination of demographic; intellectual; and political developments that will drive the crazies from the GOP? Will the departure of Barack Obama from the political picture ease the racialist undertone that underlies much Republican rhetoric?

    I'm not overly optimistic. But there are, perhaps, green shoots. Like this recent NY Times OP-DOC about the decision of prominent Evangelical leader Rev. Rob Schenck to part company with the Republicans over one of the hot-button issues of the day.

     
  2. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #2
    I don't think there was any moment, just a gradual leaning away from older party ideals. If you want to go far back enough, Nixon wasn't the best example of a Republican president. Maybe it started there.
     
  3. CalWizrd Suspended

    CalWizrd

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    #3
    I have to agree with your sentiments. I too have been an enthusiastic Republican in days gone by, but I find the current party to be somewhere between reprehensible and disgusting.

    I can't pin down exactly when and where it happened, but it certainly became an obscene presence when the party started to get heavily involved in social issues... most notably the abortion issue. The so called "Rockefeller Republicans" seemed to disappear from sight to be gradually replaced by the (ugh) Palin ilk.

    I am conservative in many things. Taxes and spending, crime, foreign policy, etc. But, and this is the big but, I am socially liberal (or progressive, depending on your vocabulary choices). Where does one go to find a candidate (House, Senate, as well as President) who best represents my thoughts and desires?

    I don't know.

    It ain't Hillary... but it ain't Ted Cruz either!
     
  4. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #4
    Republicanism went off the rails when they let the crazy sky-fairy worshippers take over their party.

    This country needs an Eisenhower right now more than anything.
     
  5. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #5
    The whole of US politics took a turn for the worst, when it started pandering to people’s fears, and not their DREAMS.
     
  6. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #6
    Some of the population realized dreams aren't free. We haven't paid for the last two generation of dreams, time to slow it down a bit before we hit a brick wall.
     
  7. DakotaGuy, Oct 31, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2015

    DakotaGuy macrumors 68040

    DakotaGuy

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    #7
    I've said it before, but I'll say it again... If the Republicans really want to beat Hillary in the General election I'd strongly suggest a John Kasich/Marco Rubio ticket. That ticket would be hard to beat since it would appeal to Independents and Moderate Democrats. Strong conservatives would come out in droves to vote for Kasich/Rubio even if the ticket isn't as conservative as they would like because I can't see them sitting at home and allowing Hillary to win.

    This is just all my opinion, but an Ohio-Florida combination of politicians who are pretty popular in their home States (Kasich 62% approval in Ohio) and Rubio (57% approval in Florida) would give the Clinton team headaches in those must win States. Maybe not "must win" but the path becomes very narrow without them. Especially seeing the shift right in Iowa and Colorado during the 2014 election.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/artic...why-kasich-rubio-right-2016-ticket-myra-adams
     
  8. CalWizrd Suspended

    CalWizrd

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    #8
    I would agree with you except...

    Kasich (from my personal perspective) has a significant problem in his presentation skills. I like what he says for the most part, but he looked and sounded terrible in the last debate. He seemed whiney and all over the place. I think Hillary (as much as I detest her) would eat his lunch in a one on one debate. And too many voters go strictly by veneer rather than substance.
     
  9. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #9
    Yup, they're only "free" if you're a corporation.
     
  10. maxsix Suspended

    maxsix

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    #10
    The Clinton Machine will deliver her Majesty to the Coronation at the precise time. With her vast experience, stellar communication skills that are virtually unmatched by the opposition, she's assured victory.

    It'll be very festive. Katy Perry is a huge draw. Nicky Minaj singing her wildly popular song "Truffle Butter" (link to definition & lyrics below) to the delight of BO's Daughters, Hip Hop fans, DJ's and Thugs from coast to coast.

    Dem's will have gotten their wish and all will be right with the vapid types. :D




    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=truffle+butter&utm_source=search-action

    http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/nickiminaj/trufflebutter.html
     
  11. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #11
    And on Rubio:
    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/leak...ocuments-slam-rubio-reveals/story?id=34855767
     
  12. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #12
    Art is supposed to provoke...
     
  13. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

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    #13
    The focus on attracting social conservatives to the GOP was more or less simultaneous with the "southern strategy". There used to be far more conservatives in the democratic party, those George Wallace voters as an example, but in great numbers they changed parties over social issues. Fiscal conservatives in the GOP used to think they controlled the party but it's become clear that they're now secondary to social conservatives
     
  14. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #14
    The appeal to the "Silent Majority" (the largely middle class, less educated, more conservative, white males) was used in conjunction with Nixon's "southern strategy" beginning in the late 1960s through the 1970s. Nixon and his V.P. (Agnew) used the Silent Majority ploy to polarize and divide the country into two camps, and the battle cry "America -- Love it or leave it!" was born.

    By the late 1970s, the evangelical Southern Baptist pastor, Jerry Falwell, founded the Moral Majority, and sweet talked Ronald Reagan and the Republican Party into taking a ride on the crazy train that became known as the Far Right Wing Express...
     
  15. Praxis91 macrumors regular

    Praxis91

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    #15
    The statist leftists are the crazy ones.
     
  16. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #16
    Yeah. Good thing they only exist on the insane fringes of the far left.

    OR SO I THINK! O_0
     
  17. CalWizrd Suspended

    CalWizrd

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    #17
    It's both sides! Why seemingly intelligent people can't comprehend that extremism is the problem is a mystery to me. The only way this country can ever govern effectively is to embrace the "bizarre" concept of compromise.

    It's way past time to wake up.
     
  18. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #18
    Why? Because they don't want to live in a theocracy?
     
  19. whodatrr macrumors 6502a

    whodatrr

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    #19
    Rove and Newt were the downfall.

    Karl Rove playing Gay Marriage and other cards to mobilize the masses was a big part of it. This turned the GOP discussion away from fiscal conservatives, and made it more about ideas on morality. We stopped the discussion about the hard stuff in the middle, and started just screaming at each other from opposite ends of a wide chasm.

    Newt Gingrich and his Rubber Stamp congress was another part of it. Any congressman who didn't vote with the masses would lose funding, and could be primaries. This aided in a congress where politicians don;t really think about issues, they have party bosses for that, but spend most of their time working on their next election. Really, few of these people know much about the issues they vote on any more - they just do what they're told.

    I also hate these buckets we all must have today. Though I largely vote Democratic, I'm on the other side with many issues (own lots of guns, a realist on Foreign Policy, etc.). Truth be told, for this system to work, we need two strong parties.
     
  20. maxsix Suspended

    maxsix

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    #20
    It's the Apple / White House's matching hypocrisy that's entertaining.

    Apple censors apps, but Nicky is the holy high dollar earner on iTunes. The Frat Boy at Pennsylvania Ave is the toast of Late Night comedy, thug life nation and shares HRC's love of BLM. They're such a class act.
     
  21. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #21
    I'm skeptical whether Cruz would even measure up as a fiscal conservative in that role.
     
  22. WarHeadz macrumors 6502a

    WarHeadz

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    #22
    Wow that sounds like a blast! I hope it goes down exactly as you have envisioned it. Complete with the live performance of Truffle Butter. But Drake and Lil Wayne have to be there as well because the song isn't complete without them.
     
  23. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #23
    Correct. The ones who want less discrimination, better wages, and better futures for people are way more crazy than those who fight for discrimination, put firearm ownership as a #1 priority, and let corporations rule the roost.

    Yeah, you got it.
     
  24. Huntn, Nov 1, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2015

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #24
    If I had to pick a decade, it would be the 1960s with the rise of civil rights and social consciousness. Conservatives finally got fed up with having their arms twisted to be good people, to such an extent that they felt compelled to redefine Christianity so they could keep calling themselves Christians. However, there really was a one-two punch starting with worker rights and slapping down Tycoons during the New Deal, but it was this racial fairness crap that put them over the edge. ;)

    Can it be redeemed? Hmm. I remember some decent Republicans from my youth, but unfortunately most of them seemed to have been flushed and if still alive would be calling themselves Democrats or Independents.
     
  25. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #25
    This goes for both parties.

    I watched all the republican debates so far but I couldn't sit through the democratic one. Just horrible!

    The only democrat who at least mentioned some pressing issues was of course Sanders. I just pray that Hitlary doesn't get the nonination.

    Compared to the candidates of the democratic party Christie, Huckabee, Cruz, Rubio, Paul, Fiorina and of course Trump seem like beacons of hope and sanity.
     

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