Why are so many young people being arrested today?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jnpy!$4g3cwk, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #1
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-01/uosc-sho010314.php

    Why are so many young people being arrested? To what extent does it prevent those young people with an arrest record from getting decent jobs?

    I also was surprised by the rate for young women-- I don't have numbers, but, that has to be way up from when I was young.
     
  2. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #2
    Play stupid games/win stupid prizes for many. Knockout game & gazillion stupid laws contribute to this as well
     
  3. SoAnyway macrumors 6502

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    Three words: Private Prison INDUSTRY.

    We live in an age where people are products and private prisons need to make money quite literally off of people staying in their facility. So instead of treating people like human beings, people are treated like cattle and therefore private prisons have an incentive to keep people incarcerated.

    Private prisons have lobbyists who lobby for laws that are designed to be stricter than they should be. An example of this is with the drug laws. I read somewhere that the vast majority prisoners are serving multiyear sentences for possession of marijuana. So if there are laws that are designed to be so strict against marijuana, it's no wonder why so many people are arrested for even possessing small amount. It's because of laws like this that lead to the police state that we live in. Police encounters are now designed to treat every individual as a suspect and officers are trained to look for something, like a small amount of marijuana, to arrest an individual in order to funnel them into one of these private prisons.
     
  4. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    I would imagine the two main culprits are our silly policies on drugs and poverty (why should one obey the rules of a society that does not care and does not benefit you?).
     
  5. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    Culture of violence. No one will say it, but it's true.
     
  6. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    The notion that private prisons are causing people to do crimes is a bit naive.

    The major problem is its extremely easy to get arrested, and we have a lot of dumb laws on the books for marijuana and alcohol. Anyone over 18 should be legally able to drink alcohol if they choose.
     
  7. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    Depending on your point of view, I'd say that much of the United States is essentially "over-policed."

    Look at the issue of cops in schools. Nowadays, pretty much every urban school in the country has at least one sworn Police officer on-duty throughout the school day. And then you've got a "zero tolerance" culture that means grade-schoolers get led away in handcuffs for bringing a squirt gun to school.

    Transgressions that, back in the day, would maybe result in a trip to the Principal's office, maybe a call to the parents, or (at worst) a suspension these days often result in an arrest.

    And then you've got the whole war-on-drugs; stop-and-frisk culture that pretty much targets any and all urban minorities. Is it any wonder that you end up with the numbers that you do? If my graduating class (1981) had been subject to daily random pat downs, I'd guarantee that at least 50% of the kids would have ended up arrested before they left high school.
     
  8. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    #8
    Private prisons aren't causing people to do crimes, but the fact that private prisons have a contract where they have to have a full prison helps to get police officers to look for more criminals. We aren't really committing more crimes than ever, we're just being arrested for them more than ever.
     
  9. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    I think it is definitely true that the private corrections industry is part of the "self-licking ice-cream cone" of our low-level criminal justice system.

    Take any number of crimes: Drunk driving; small-time drug possession and dealing; etc. - and ask yourself about the huge industry of defense lawyers; substance-absue counselors; prosecutors; Judges; court clerks; probation officers; etc. that the state has built up.

    What would those people do if there wasn't a steady supply of low-level suspects coming through for them to fleece?
     
  10. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    #10
    Deal with real problems?
     
  11. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    The problem is nobody wants to deal with real problems. They just want their pay check so they can go home at the end of the day and sit on their fat ass on the couch and watch Duck Dynasty.


    Why are so many people arrested now in America? America is becoming a police state, that's why. We've got more incarcerated citizens per capita than any other country in the world. It's a combination of ridiculous laws, militarized police, and like other said above, the special interests and profits of the legal and prison systems.
     
  12. BenTrovato macrumors 68020

    BenTrovato

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    #12
    Article is for US data. While I think it's an important question to ponder, an even bigger eye opening question to consider is why the US incarceration rate is so high compared to every other country in the world? The mindset of jailing people needs to change.
     
  13. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    What public space do teenagers have these days? There is very little space in towns and cities that are accessible after the sun sets and apparently just being outside is suspicious to police (aka the enforcing arm of the private prison industry).

    That with the hardening of police forces, the very idea that simply asking an officer a question when he gives you an unlawful order ("get out of the car" with no indication as to why you've even been pulled over) as grounds to stick a disorderly conduct charge on someone for "talking back", is just a mixture that results in an extremely warped idea of freedom.

    This country has been placing itself further and further into lockdown for decades and 9/11 gave an excuse to really ratchet things up.

    Funny how these kinds of crackdowns trend very neatly with the rise of civil unrest, distrust in the government, and the lynchpin: the stagnation of the american economy for everyone but the rich.
     
  14. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #14
    You can thank the Reagan Administration for those Nanny rules. MADD got to them and they threatened to cut off highway funding if they didn't raise the drinking age to 21. Now MADD+SADD want it changed it to 25.
     
  15. unlinked, Jan 10, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2014

    unlinked macrumors 6502a

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    I read somewhere that the US actually imprisions less people than in Europe. The higher prison population is due to longer sentences not imprisoning more people.

    I must admit I find it kinda amazing that the US isn't some low crime mecca when there are 7 times as many people per capita in prison as Ireland. They must be putting the wrong people in jail.
     
  16. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    ...

    I can't understand the logic behind some people's arguments. People can go to war, kill people, but they're not legally allowed to drink.
     
  17. entatlrg macrumors 68040

    entatlrg

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    #17
    Well said.
     
  18. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #18
    lets raise the age that you can join the military to 25 :D
     
  19. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    I'm sure that would never pass. :p
     
  20. entatlrg macrumors 68040

    entatlrg

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    The upsetting part is why the middle class or the average Joe isn't doing more about it and protesting and causing this civil unrest. The government seems to be walking all over everything... and we all just let it happen.
     
  21. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #21
    sad to say you are correct.:(
     
  22. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    When I entered the Army at the age of 24 i noticed in my Japan barracks there was a beer vending machine (that surprised me the first time I went in there) of the bottom floor lounge. A Lieutenant told me they follow the local drinking laws!
     
  23. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    I say it should all be 18.

    Smoking, drinking, going to war, and ... driving. Maybe make the driver's permit able to be gotten at 16 and then stuck through until 18. That might be alright.
     
  24. EvilQueen macrumors 6502

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    Yea....that's why people break the law. To keep the prisons in business. :rolleyes: That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard.
     
  25. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    #25
    That still means a soldier could go to war for a few years and kill people, but couldn't come back to the states to consume a legal beverage. Well, not legal for them... I was just making sure that nobody plays the "illegal drugs" card.

    ----------

    http://rollingout.com/political-sca...g-states-for-millions-if-they-dont-stay-full/
    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/09/...-so-private-prisons-require-maximum-capacity/

    So it isn't that people are performing more crime, it's that people are being arrested more for the same (if not slightly lesser) crime rates.
     

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