Why do some professions get 'tips'?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by uberamd, Jun 23, 2009.

  1. uberamd macrumors 68030

    uberamd

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    Minnesota
    #1
    First let me say that I am a good tipper. I on average tip between 18-25% when I go out. Having said that, I HATE the concept behind tipping, I just do it so I don't get a bad reputation at the places I frequent. To me, giving a tip (or gratuity) is rewarding someone for doing what they are supposed to be doing anyway. So, if that is their job, why do they deserve more? Sure, you carried my food out to me, but isn't that your job? Heck, you didn't even cook my food. So why the extra pay? Why don't the employers increase the rate so people don't need to cover what the employer is saving?

    I work with computers, and I get no tips. I get paid, but nobody ever slides me an extra $10 for removing a virus, or cleaning up their system. So why should I pay someone extra for walking food out to me? Or for cutting my hair properly?

    Idk it just makes no sense to me why some jobs get gratuity and others don't.
     
  2. slpdLoad macrumors 6502a

    slpdLoad

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #2
    Agreed - tipping people who cut my hair is always an especially odd situation.

    It's not my fault your business can't figure out how to adequately pay you.
     
  3. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Chicago, Illinois
    #3
    Because if the employer had to price the food to cover that, you most likely wouldn't be able to afford to eat there.

    Also- if you don't like it- start a restaurant where you the employer match the waitstaff for what they would make in tips somewhere else. Let me know how long you're in business.

    Either way, don't take out your lack of understanding on the employee. You only hurt them. The employer doesn't care.
     
  4. slpdLoad macrumors 6502a

    slpdLoad

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    Jun 10, 2009
    #4
    I'll add that I think the real issue is that at a restaurant at least there is a set convention for how much you should pay, and everyone is comfortable with that.

    With other services it's just some odd guilt game for what you should be tipping, and it just pisses everyone off.
     
  5. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    UK
    #5
    25% is getting completely over the top though providing some tip (up to 15% - if good service is offered) is definitely an incentive for them to deliver good service.

    You have to refuse to tip (or tip less than expected - this is actually better) if the service is poor though.
     
  6. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    Jul 4, 2003
    Location:
    Terlingua, Texas
    #6
    A history lesson for the younguns: The word, "tip" comes from the phrase, "To Insure Promptness".

    A waitress got a bit of an extra reward, usually 10% in the Old Daze, signifying pleasure with the quality of service. Poor service, and an insult tip of a penny was left.

    Tipping of other than waitresses and barmaids, generally, was not customary until somewhere in the 1960s/1970s. Yeah, cabbies and valet parking, but those were relatively much smaller in comparative number and not common for the majority of the public. Further, the amount of the tips, percentagewise, has increased.

    Rich folks might have tipped a barber, but not Joe Sixpack.
     
  7. uberamd thread starter macrumors 68030

    uberamd

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    #7
    ? I don't. I said I tip VERY well, I just don't think it makes sense because I never get tips and at my early jobs I was paid the same as a waiter was from my employer, just minus the tips.

    And I can't tell you how many times my waitress/waiter friends have bragged to me about the money they are pulling in from tips and how they make $30+/hr at work. Sounds like they are really hurting.
     
  8. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Chicago, Illinois
    #8
    As someone who was in that business for 20 years, I can tell you that it is well-earned. I work in advertising now, but I will never forget how hard the restaurant business is. It's the most difficult work I've ever done. Now- sitting in an office, dealing with clients and doing creative work seems like a cake walk in comparison.

    Until you've done it, don't judge.
     
  9. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    Aug 13, 2003
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    the faraway towns
    #9
    I've gotten tips for removing viruses and cleaning up systems. One guy over-payed me by half for recovering most of his data from a dodgy laptop drive. (Target Disk mode makes anyone look like a genius).
     
  10. That-Is-Bull macrumors 6502

    That-Is-Bull

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    Sep 29, 2007
    Location:
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    #10
    I usually tip 20% to 25%, 15% is bare minimum. I've never had horrible service though.

    Am I supposed to tip at places like Sonic? All they do is walk ten feet to bring me my food, but sometimes they seem to expect one.
     
  11. imac/cheese macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    I worked at Sonic when I was younger and customers tipped about 50% of the time.
     
  12. stevento macrumors 6502

    stevento

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    Los Angeles
    #12
    I posted a thread like this a few months ago.
    Here's the logic behind tipping: You should do it because waiters don't make much money from hourly wages and they have to live.

    Then I say this: what about folks who work 40 hours a week at McDonald's? they make about minimum wage. should we tip them?

    how about the full time short order cooks who make the food? they earn $12/hr if they are lucky. If the food is delicious, then they should get tips as well, right?

    I have a terrible pet peeve of people who tip IN EXCESS then expect you to do the same. When we go out to eat, my brother says "let's all pitch in for a 25% tip." I can't stand it.
    And there's nothing more egregious then when a restaurant adds the tip into the bill for you. When we want to go to a place that says something like "15% gratuity added for a party of 6 or more", then we just go and pretend like we are two separate parties, and sit close to each other and move the tables together. We still tip. But we tip the amount we want to tip, not a predetermined amount.
     
  13. rhsgolfer33 macrumors 6502a

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    Jan 6, 2006
    #13
    I always thought 15% was the minimum. I usually tip around 20% provided the service is good. I'll occasionally dip down to 10% or lower if the service is really heinous, but I rarely have occasion to go below 15%.
     
  14. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    UK
    #14
    You know that the tips added for large parties are optional - they are only added as otherwise large parties often don't tip (or don't tip much) - even if the service is good/adequate.
     
  15. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #15
    I think this may be a cultural difference ;), we usually only tip 10%.
     
  16. iShater macrumors 604

    iShater

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    #16
    I could swear we have been through this topic/thread before! :eek:
     
  17. Jaffa Cake macrumors Core

    Jaffa Cake

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    #17
    We do go over it quite often. The usual conclusion seems to be that we British are incredibly stingy because we don't constantly tip. ;)
     
  18. rhsgolfer33 macrumors 6502a

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    Jan 6, 2006
    #18
    Yeah, I've made a few tipping mistakes when traveling overseas. I'll never forget the snicker the waiter in Venice gave when I gave him €5 on a €20 bill when there was already a charge for the table on the bill. Oh well. :)
     
  19. BaronvdB macrumors 6502

    BaronvdB

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    Oct 22, 2007
    #19
    if the employers just paid them more and got rid of tipping then I bet the level of service you get would drop....tipping puts a little extra motiviation on the table--they way it is now if they do a suck job they know they will get less of a tip...if the employers paid them extra and there was no tipping they would probably just slack off b/c they know they are getting a set amount of money whether you liked their service or not.
     
  20. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #20
    I think tipping people who are doing things that are optional (bellhops, valets, etc.) makes sense because they really are doing you a "favor" or a service. You really could park your own car or carry your own luggage, but instead you "pay" someone else to do it for you.

    The mentality behind "why should I tip a waiter when it's his job to bring me my food" can be answered with this: tipping offers some sort of incentive for the server to go above and beyond. If we had a system where nobody ever tipped, and no server ever expected it, I think the quality of service at most places would drop into the toilet.

    I used to deliver pizzas when I started college, and only about half the people tipped. You could usually do better with tips by not only bringing extra napkins, parmesan cheese packets, etc. - but by actually bringing to the customer's attention that you did it: "...and here are some extra napkins and cheese packets for you, is there anything else?" These days it seems the pizza joints are actually charging delivery fees on top of the price of the pizza - hopefully that goes to the drivers.
     
  21. Shivetya macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    #21
    I do not tip jars, I do tip people.

    That means, if there is a tip jar out I ignore it. If its a person waiting on me at a table or counter I will tip them if the service is good, which is very rarely not the case - bad wait staff doesn't last.
     
  22. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    Birmingham, AL
    #22
    The guy who cuts my hair is self-employed and has never failed to go the extra mile if I needed it (squeezing me in between appointments, helping the missus out after a certain disastrous attempt at self-coloring, etc) so I have no problem tipping him. Plus he's the only guy in town that can cut my hair the way I like it, so I like to keep him happy. He charges $16, he gets $20, every time.

    I loathe tip jars, probably because they're usually located in places where the staff isn't paid $2.13/hr plus tips. Just another socially acceptable excuse to be greedy.
     
  23. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #23
    I tend to be a good tipper unless servcie was not good.

    I'll be damned if I'll leave tips in jars on the counters in retail stores though unless something extraordinary occurs. Seems a tip jar has appeared in virtually every retail store these days.
     
  24. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #24
    I don't know if I buy this... as the OP stated, they tip, and tip reasonably well... if I'm tipping, say, 15-30% (I don't tip much more than 15% on large bills, but if it's a small bill, I usually do), then the average tip is unlikely to be any more than what I give, so I'm not sure that, were the price up-adjusted, I wouldn't be paying the same thing now.

    I'd prefer a system, to be honest, where tips were verboten and salaries or wages were commensurately higher, and the companies took on responsibility of monitoring and rewarding employee performance. OTOH, I'm more-or-less perfectly willing to accept tipping in well established situations... I don't have a problem tipping my hair stylist, my bartender, my waiter, etc. I don't mind self-service / ordering queue restaurants having a tip jar but don't feel particularly inclined to tip for that.

    I'm still resistant to the creep of tipping to more and more situations, especially when it's not established process. I don't like the idea, for instance, that I quote three different moving companies for a $1500 interstate move, and then find out that the one I went with has employees who want a tip from me, when the others didn't (it's not pro forma to tip interstate movers). If I'm going to be unpredictably pressured to tip, what's the point in going through a multi-source bidding process?

    Actually, the $5 mocha is a perfect example of this... it's customary for coffee shops to have tip jars, and as far as I've seen it, it's customary for customers to tip occasionally -- I have never, ever experienced a situation where every customer in line is tipping the barista. I follow this practice also, tipping intermittently (depending... at the amazing coffee stand I used in Florida, I would just tip every few times I went there, since the service was always good; at other coffee shops, I tip every few times or when service is particularly good). But I went to a coffee shop in Grand Rapids (that had lousy espresso drinks, incidentally) and the baristas were (loudly) complaining that every customer wasn't tipping them.

    I think that's as inappropriate as stiffing a waiter (where it is customary to always tip) because you're stingy or object to tipping (which I don't do anyways).

    And to rdowns's point, the spread of this practice to other forms of retail is even more ridiculous.
     
  25. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Chicago, Illinois
    #25
    I think it's weird when people are making minimum wage and above as well. Waitstaff do NOT, however. They are well below minimum.
     

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