Why does no one ever complain that box office figures are never listed on ticket sale

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by afd, Mar 30, 2014.

  1. afd macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    Just read that Frozen has broken box office records beating toy story etc. With cinema tickets going up isn't that inevitable? My granny said she could get into the pictures with jam jars, cost me a tenner last time I went I think, not really surprising box office records are being broken
     
  2. palmerc2 macrumors 65816

    palmerc2

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    #2
    Not a big issue? A little google search can get you an answer? Maybe the individual movie theaters don't want to constantly update their tickets to reflect how much money it's made. Do you not want companies to make money? Do you not like to be entertained? If they aren't making money they're not entertaining you with their films.

    This is really here nor there, but I never go to the theaters. I'd rather wait for it to come out on Blu Ray and just buy it. I have a great home theater setup and get an awesome experience. Plus I can pause, rewind and even continue the movie the next day if need be.

    I dunno, just my thoughts.
     
  3. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #3
    Because no one cares.

    Movie studios, producers ,editors, movie theaters, and eventually DVD and Blu Ray publishers need to make money.
     
  4. skottichan macrumors 6502a

    skottichan

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    #4
    Let's not forget the design artists, animators, writers, cinematographers, etc. If the movie studio doesn't make money, then those people are less likely to get more work.

    To OP, you do understand there's a thing called inflation, right? To be honest, movies are still a very reasonable price.

    Example, average price per ticket;

    2014 - $8.39
    1970 - $1.55

    If you adjust the prices for inflation, the tickets from 1970 would cost $8.99 in today's money.


    So, tell me again how prices are going up.
     
  5. unlinked macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    People like to have stories about records being broken.

    Inflation adjusted there is 1 film since 2000 in the top 20 US boxoffice.
     
  6. macquariumguy macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    Let's not forget the investors who fronted the money to make the film in the first place. If they don't get a return on their investment, they'll find some other place to put their money and then there won't be any more big expensive blockbusters.
     
  7. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    #7
  8. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    '

    That is of the true, and with way new movies are made, Im surprised that prices are still so low.
     
  9. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #9

    Back in 1970, the only other place they could sell their movie to was broadcast TV. Today, they have many more ways to sell the movie.
     
  10. skottichan macrumors 6502a

    skottichan

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    #10
    This is true. We've had films that have performed poorly in theaters, only to succeed in the home market (Scott Pilgrim being one), which is why we've been getting more of a "shotgun" approach to film production. The nice thing, this has lead to less "sure winner" movies getting financed like Marvel's Ant-Man.
     
  11. BigHungry04 macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Movie theatres only get a small percentage of the purchase price of a ticket. Even the surcharges for 3D and large format screens such as IMAX go to the company that services the screen. The 3D surcharge pays for using RealD systems for 3D. While most of the revenue of publicly traded cinemas is from ticket sales, the vast majority of profits come from concessions. These profits pay for employees, and utilities.

    The distributors charge more for certain movies. Some distributors charge upwards of 70% of the ticket for the privilege of showing their film. One of these days cinemas will have to base their ticket prices on the distributor of the film. Be glad that hasn't happened yet.
     
  12. giantfan1224 macrumors 6502a

    giantfan1224

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    #12
    According to this site, $1.55 in 1970 is $9.58 today. It makes sense to me that movie prices would be less today then in 1970, comparatively speaking, because of DVD's, Netflix, On-demand, Pay-per-view, iTunes, etc. Movie houses have to compete with that and therefore can't charge whatever they want and get it--which they probably could do in 1970 because it was pretty much your only chance to see the movie.
     
  13. sviato macrumors 68020

    sviato

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    #13
    I think what the OP means is that these records should be reported by the number of ticket sales rather than the gross $ amount.
     
  14. skottichan macrumors 6502a

    skottichan

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    #14
    Okay, let's figure that out. (all numbers are for Domestic only, since we're talking about the US ticket prices)

    1977 - Star Wars. Initial run sales number $215,537,332 (unadjusted). Average ticket price $2.23 (unadjusted). Giving us a total of approximately 96,653,512 tickets sold

    2012 - Marvel's The Avengers. Initial run sales number $621,414,627 (unadjusted). Average ticket price $7.96 (unadjusted). Giving us a total of approximately 78,067,164 tickets sold.


    I'm sure you're thinking "Whoa, $215 million is a lot less than $621 million! So my argument that ticket sales are gouging us in 2014!", but alas, that is not true.

    Adjusting the inflation from 1977 to 2012's dollar, we see that, Star Wars made; $835,751,559.92 in 2012's currency, because adjusted for inflation, movie tickets in 1977 cost $8.65, so tickets in 1977 cost more of your buying power than they did in 2012.

    Also, there was a LOT less competition in theaters in 1977. Star Wars' initial run was 327 days versus The Avengers' 129 days.

    This is like the people complaining about the prices of video games an consoles. When adjusted for 2013 inflation, a Nintendo 64 was $300, which puts it into the modern console's price range, but here's the kicker. Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time was $60 in 1998, which adjusts to $85 in modern money. (Then you had Final Fantasy 7 which was $50 in 1997 ($75 in 2014).
     
  15. TheAppleFairy macrumors 68020

    TheAppleFairy

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    #15
    Exactly, not to mention that population is always increasing too so if there are more people in the world it increases the number of people who might pay to see a movie.
     
  16. mojolicious macrumors 68000

    mojolicious

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    #16
    I *think* the OP was simply asking that sales figures be inflation-adjusted, although actual bums on actual seats would be better still.
     

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