Why I'm Glad The App Store is vetted and I'll never Jail Break my iphone 2.0

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by LiveForever, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. LiveForever macrumors 6502

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    #1
    The downside to open openness.

    I'll have my iphone locked up like Fort Knox as long as the things I buy for it work.

    This is why MS Mobile and Android both who celebrate their open to every man and his dog, his rabbit and goldfish credentials will fail. When it comes to phones they have to be utterly secure as we will be doing our banking, our work and our socialising on them.

    It would be like leaving your brain open for someone to infect with a virus.


    A quarter of US PCs infected with malware: OECD

     
  2. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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  3. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #3
    FUD.

    While there are risks, given a little knowledge and care it's perfectly simple to keep an "open" device secure while enjoying the benefits that it brings.
     
  4. LiveForever thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #4
    Maybe but a quarter that is 1 in 4 PC's are infected and I bet 80% of those have fire walls, anti virus etc.

    I have all these things plus spam trap, email filters but I still get my PC infected.

    Honestly that's what I got an imac to work along my PC.

    I concede for you IT kings its a breeze but we are talking about mass market things and even more mass market phones then why should the average guy in the street be expected to have a degree in Software engineering to protect his life.
     
  5. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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    #5
    Both Windows and OSX are "open" platforms. Your logic is flawed. Linux is even more open and has even less security issues.
     
  6. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #6
    Sadly I doubt it's any where near 80%.
    I honestly don't know how. I have used PC's for years and have never been infected with a virus or serious ad/mal-ware. I don't go to town either, the setup has been pretty simple. AV (Norton AV Corp), software firewall, sat behind a router.
    While you do have a point, you also over state it, you hardly need to be a software engineer (I know you were exaggerating, but still) to keep a safe system.

    The App Store is nothing more than a way for Apple to keep control, and more importantly is another revenue stream.
     
  7. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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    #7
    Whilst this is true I don't have a huge problem with it. It's also a way for Apple to maintain the quality (good or bad, not sure on current iPhone :) ) of the user experience.

    However, if they really cared about user experience they'd have a word with O2 about EDGE (and soon HSDPA) coverage - but I digress.
     
  8. onlycopunk macrumors 6502

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    #8
    You'll never Jailbreak your iPhone 2.0 because you don't have one. Duh.
     
  9. rockstarjoe macrumors 6502a

    rockstarjoe

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    #9
    For me this is the best reason... I think it will help seperate the good, useful apps from the crap.
     
  10. Padraig macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    Android will also be utilizing a marketplace. Personally, I think it's mainly about controlling the revenue stream. We can all discern good products from the bad.
     
  11. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #11
    Mobile devices have a huge advantage over desktop/laptop computers: they're much easier to wipe and restore apps to, if a problem arises.

    In ten years, I've never seen a mobile virus on Windows Mobile. There was only a minor incident with Bluetooth on (I think) Nokia phones a year or so ago.

    Until the iPhone came along, and Jobs used security reasons for not allowing third party apps, it was not a problem. (Remember his BS about taking down the network?)

    Symantec and other anti-virus companies are now licking their chops at the idea of bogging down our smartphones with their software.

    Vetting apps wouldn't stop a disgruntled programmer from sneaking in timebomb code. What does stop it from being a problem, is the sandbox that all apps are in... which supposedly means there's no need for Apple to check for security breaches at all.
     
  12. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #12
    Maybe.

    Apple will also forbid good, really useful apps, such as alternative browsers, Flash video players, UI customization, and user friendly programming languages.
     
  13. Small White Car macrumors G4

    Small White Car

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    #13
    Apple has come out with strict rules for apps in the way they use power and access the systems.

    Let's imagine a world without the Apple store where you find 20 'good' apps that all bend those rules a little. No single app is 'bad' (they all work fine on their own) but after buying all 20 you find that they add up and your battery life is now 45 minutes even when not using the phone for anything.

    What do you do? There's no single 'bad' app there, remember. Well, your only choice is to re-format and say "to hell with applications."

    And that's the most likely outcome. People aren't going to trouble-shoot and figure out what's wrong. They're just going to stop buying apps. You'll quickly end up with a world where only 15 - 20% of iPhone users ever buy an online app.

    The Apple-store method may restrict the number of apps, but I guarantee it will boost the number of iPhones with apps on them. This will greatly help developers make more sales since their market will be larger.
     
  14. rockstarjoe macrumors 6502a

    rockstarjoe

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    #14
    That is a good point... hmm...
     
  15. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #15
    This is very well said, and probably the major logic behind the app store and the restrictions. It has far less to do with viruses and far more to do with general concern that people don't know or don't want to know the painstaking steps of: phone crashes. wipe phone. install one app. wait. if no crash, install second app. wait. lather, rinse, repeat. It's both time consuming and irritating.
     
  16. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #16
    Heck, restoring etc is irritating now for people, without any third party apps at all.

    If after all these months, Apple still can't figure out how to keep their own apps from crashing, or updates from screwing some owners up, what in the world makes people think they can make sure somebody else's apps won't ?

    :D

    I'm not against the idea, I just don't think it'll solve world hunger.

    Historically, far more helpful would be a process viewer, so that you could quickly figure out what was chewing up your device, kill it and avoid it. In a way, Apple is doing that automatically when Safari takes too long. Do they have a similar response heartbeat for user apps?
     
  17. needthephone macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    I tend to agree that by only allowing apps to be downloaded form a TRUSTED source will help protect the owners. OK , Its a revenue stream but I say great good luck to apple. The iphone research has to be paid for somehow and apple deserve to make a profit.

    I think the word "open" is the wrong terminology, its more about using TRUSTED sources for downloads.

    I would rather download a song from itunes rather than go to say allofMP3 or some other dodgy site. OK you'll download a song but what else are you downloading. It will slip in past all your firewalls and virus scanners.


    I would rather have a reliable phone and a slightly limited choice of apps compared to a phone I can willingly download anything from anywhere and risk a comprimised phone.

    To all the smug people saying with a little care its easy to protect your PC. Don't be too sure, half the time you won't know you have anything. We are talking about the subtle crashes, hang ups, difficulty to shut down etc which are all signs you have something dodgy.

    You can pick these up just downloading demo software. I have all the protection money can buy but i still get adware, trojans and they all get past some how.
     
  18. BongoBanger macrumors 68000

    BongoBanger

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    Feb 5, 2008
    #18
    This story is just a big pile of FUD.

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=462

    A three year old study extrapolated to give a stupid and meaningless figure for the tabloids to scream about.
     
  19. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #19
    Citation please.
    Not if its a separate application, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.
    Agreed
    What's wrong with Cocoa?
    I agree.

    Seriously? As an everyday solution for non techie users?
     
  20. minik macrumors 65816

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    #20
    I don't see the reason to jailbreak the iPhone/iPod touch, at least for me.
     

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