Why no Retina monitor for MBP?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by mortenjensen, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. mortenjensen macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2012
    #1
    Hi all,
    I have a MBP 15'' which at work is attached to a Dell 24'' IPS-panel giving me 1920px wide screen.
    My next MBP will be a retina-model - and I would then like to upgrade my monitor to a retina-monitor.

    However, I have not seen any such.

    Why is that?

    Morten
     
  2. saturnotaku macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2013
    #2
    Cost and high PPI doesn't matter so much on a larger screen.
     
  3. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Location:
    In the core of a black hole.
    #3
    True but that does not mean they don't exist, they do but cost a fortune.
     
  4. Stetrain macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    #4
    1) Larger screens at high pixel densities have larger chances of dead/defective pixels which makes them more costly to produce. This gets better over time as the production technology improves.

    A 27" display at roughly the same pixel density as the retina Macbooks would be something like 5120x2880 pixels. That's 14,745,600 pixels that have a chance to be defective.

    2) Right now there isn't a good display cable standard to handle that high resolution. I think that a future version of Displayport is planned to be able handle larger resolutions.

    We'll probably see such a display from Apple in two or three years.
     
  5. mortenjensen thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2012
    #5
    I am just thinking of a screen with the same resolution as the 15'' MBP retina.
    A 24'' (not 27, too big for a regular desk, IMO).

    Why is that more difficult to produce than panels for the MBP? It should be easier since it is bigger!

    Morten
     
  6. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Location:
    In the core of a black hole.
    #6
    A smaller display/surface collects less dust during manufacturing maybe.

    Just a hunch, I have little knowledge of what the manufacturing procedure is.
     
  7. Stetrain macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    #7
    I think the issue there is how you handle scaling the interface.

    The retina MBPs went to double the dpi of the previous versions, so that the GUI is now 2x the pixels in each dimension. That makes handling the scaling easier, especially for apps that haven't been updated yet.

    To do that on a ~24" monitor you'd want to jump up to something like 3840x2160, which is what the industry is calling 4k resolution.

    Going to an intermediate resolution, like 2880x1800, would mean that the text and interface would either be really tiny or really big, or not quite as sharp as it could be by using one of the scaled display modes. Basically it would just be like a 15" RMBP display blown up with no extra screen real estate, but the modes other than "best for retina" would look worse because on a large monitor you would notice the scaling more.
     
  8. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #8
    Why do you want a "Retina" monitor. I sit about 2-3 feet from the monitor and I can't see the pixels nor have I really tried either.
     
  9. mortenjensen thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2012
    #9
    I know the viewing distance is a factor. Still, my ips monitor is far from crisp as the retina screen. I would gladly pay to have a 24'' retina crisp monitor

    Morten
     
  10. MacKid macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    #10
    There are a lot of 24" and 27" computer displays that have similar resolution as the 15" rMBP. The Thunderbolt Display comes pretty close (and has the sameish resolution as the 13"), but there are more than a few out there.

    Just remember that resolution and pixel density are two different things. A 50-inch television with the same resolution (the dimensions, 2880x1800 for example) will have dramatically lower pixel density (the number of pixels in one square inch). Pixel density is what makes for the Retina magic.
     
  11. robvas macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #11
    Soon. Maybe introduced alongside the next iMac or Mac Pro release.
     

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